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Taiwan’s central bank governor Perng Fai-nan was named as the one of the world’s top central bankers for the 10th time

Taiwan’s Perng wins 10th top central banker honor

CNA 2013-08-24

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Taiwan’s central bank governor Perng Fai-nan was named as the one of the world’s top central bankers for the 10th time by Global Finance. (Photo/CNA)

Taiwan’s central bank governor Perng Fai-nan was named as the one of the world’s top central bankers for the 10th time by Global Finance on Friday in its annual report on central bankers’ performance worldwide. Perng was awarded an A for the ninth straight year from 2005-2013 in the magazine’s central bank report cards, which grades central bankers on an A to F scale. He received his first A in 2000, two years after he became governor of the Central Bank of the Republic of China (Taiwan). He is the first central bank chief to receive an A for the 10th time. Perng expressed his gratitude for the recognition and attributed his achievement to the people of Taiwan and all those who work at the central bank. Read more of this post

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The adidas method: A German firm’s unusual approach to designing its products

The adidas method: A German firm’s unusual approach to designing its products

Aug 24th 2013 | HERZOGENAURACH |From the print edition

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TEN years ago sportswear-makers were cramming ever more features and futuristic designs into their products. They were convinced that the consumer bought, say, training shoes based on their technical specifications. But in 2004 James Carnes, today adidas’s creative director for sportswear, and a Danish consultant named Mikkel Rasmussen met at a conference in Oslo at which Mr Rasmussen challenged this notion. A mobile phone, he said, may have 72 functions, but that is 50 more than most people wanted, or used. Mr Carnes was intrigued, and so began an almost decade-long engagement for ReD, the small consultancy Mr Rasmussen co-founded in Copenhagen. In that decade adidas’s sales and share price have grown steadily, alongside those of Nike, an American firm that is the global leader in sportswear (see chart). It remains far ahead of Puma, its crosstown rival. The two German firms, based in Herzogenaurach in Bavaria, were founded by brothers, Adi Dassler (hence adidas’s name) and the older Rudolf (Puma), who fell out. Read more of this post

Multinationals in China: Guardian warriors and golden eggs; The state’s crackdowns on big firms are not all about bashing foreigners

Multinationals in China: Guardian warriors and golden eggs; The state’s crackdowns on big firms are not all about bashing foreigners

Aug 24th 2013 | SHANGHAI |From the print edition

FOREIGN companies love to complain about doing business in China. The rules of the game are rigged against them, they grouse, the locals are corrupt and the government is always turning the thumbscrews on them. Amid such moans it is worth remembering that, for all the barriers that foreign multinationals face in China, it has welcomed them with open arms compared with the protectionism imposed by Japan and South Korea at comparable stages in their economic development. Nevertheless, the recent spate of high-profile crackdowns on international firms, and people associated with them, has prompted worries about a generalised anti-foreigner backlash. Read more of this post

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