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Self-Driving Cars and the Economy of Fuel by Beth Kelly

14 July 2015

Self-Driving Cars and the Economy of Fuel

By Beth Kelly

Internet search leader Google is testing its self-driving automobiles on public roads this summer. This latest phase of testing follows previous successful trials, further indicating the fact that the reality of driverless cars is coming ever-closer to fruition. It’s only a matter of time before these autonomously operating vehicles begin to displace “traditional” human-directed cars – a development that will have serious repercussions across the whole of society.

There have been plenty of features introduced over the years to make driving a car easier, like power steering and cruise control, but Google’s driverless cars are a whole new ballgame. The on-board computer will handle accelerating, braking, steering, lane positioning and all other functions without human intervention, turning the “driver” into little more than a glorified babysitter. These awesome capabilities are made possible by the fusion of sophisticated sensors and cameras with heavy-duty computing machinery to process the incoming data and determine the correct action for the vehicle to take at all times. Indeed, it’s fair to say that this new type of automobile will be more tech gadget than horseless carriage.

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19 Things That Actually Happened in 1999: Yahoo! was worth more than Berkshire Hathaway. Today Berkshire is worth approximately $360 billion, or about $320 billion more than Yahoo!

http://dividendreference.com/articles/2015/1000193/19-things-that-actually-happened-in-1999/

PUBLISHED ON MAY 27, 2015. POSTED IN EDITORIAL AND TAGGED AOLBRKABRKBCSCOIBMINTCMSFTYHOO

19 Things That Actually Happened in 1999

BY MICHAEL JOHNSTON

The happenings on Wall Street in 1999 prove that sometimes truth is stranger than fiction. Although the events of 1999 are ancient history by many standards, some very clear memories no doubt remain for many investors. With technology and biotech stocks once again hot, a number of comparisons to the last bubble have been made. But the current environment can’t come close to matching 1999, either in terms of valuations or in the sheer madness of the markets. Below are 19 events that actually happened in 1999, highlighting the irrational exuberance that swept over investors (well, most investors).

  1. Yahoo! was worth more than Berkshire Hathaway.

High-flying Yahoo! had a market cap of nearly $100 billion in 1999, putting it ahead of Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway. Barron’s even ran a cover story on the Oracle of Omaha titled “What’s Wrong, Warren?” that questioned whether the end was near for Buffett:

To be blunt, Buffett, who turns 70 in 2000, is viewed by an increasing number of investors as too conservative, even passe. Barron’s noted that it wasn’t the only voice questioning Buffett; critics from a new corner of the world were becoming increasingly vocal:

Indeed, Buffett has even started taking flak on Internet message boards. One contributor called Berkshire a “middlebrow insurance company studded with a bizarre melange of assets, including candy stores, hamburger stands, jewelry shops, a shoemaker and a third-rate encyclopedia company.”

Today Berkshire is worth approximately $360 billion, or about $320 billion more than Yahoo! Read more of this post

Daily Bamboo Innovator Insight (TMT): Thursday 13 Nov 2014 – MediaTek chief named as one of world’s best CEOs

TMT

MediaTek chief named as one of world’s best CEOs: ChinaPost

As YouTube pushes into paid content, other online music outlets are being forced to defend or change their business models to better compensate artists: NYTimes

Hasbro Said to Be in Talks to Buy DreamWorks Animation: NYTimes

Tokopedia to initiate ‘Silicon Valley’ in Indonesia: JakartaPost

Samsung Electronics chases curved smartphone wave to beat flat-screen crowd: Reuters

CIOs Turn to “Deputies’ So They Can Stay ‘Out of the Weeds’: WSJ

Venture capital world changing as hedge funds target tech startups: ValueWalk

Amazon to keep investing in cloud despite margin pressure: Reuters

Amazon: ARM Chipmakers Aren’t Matching Intel’s Innovation: Bloomberg

In One Word, Here’s Why Microsoft Should Copy Amazon’s Echo: BusinessInsider

Google Makes Its Nest At The Center Of The Smart Home

Google Makes Its Nest At The Center Of The Smart Home

Posted 1 hour ago by Matt Burns (@mjburnsy)

“Okay Google, turn down the heat.”

Using Google Now, a homeowner will soon be able to talk to a Nest Learning Thermostat and complain about the heat. And that’s just the beginning.

Google is turning the Nest Learning Thermostat into the hub of smart homes. With the “Works with Nest” certification program, announced today, gadgets, cars and universal remotes will all work with the Thermostat, providing automated actions agnostic of the brand. Suddenly the smart home world is much smaller. Read more of this post

S. Korea to export nuclear technology to Europe for first time in 50 years

S. Korea to export nuclear technology to Europe for first time in 50 years

2014.06.24 14:21:42

South Korea has de facto landed a deal to overhaul the Dutch research nuclear reactor.
This is the first time for Korea to export nuclear technology to Europe.
The Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning said Tuesday KAERI, a consortium comprising Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Hyundai Engineering & Construction and Hyundai Engineering, was picked as a preferred bidder for the ‘project to raise the research nuclear reactor’s output and construct cold neutron facilities at Delft University of Technology.’
The project seeks to boost the research reactor’s thermal output from 2 megawatt (MW) to 3 MW, upgrade various facilities and build cold neutron research facilities by the end of 2017. The deal is valued at 19 million euro (about 26 billion won).  Read more of this post

Asia turns on the taps for tech funding

June 24, 2014 2:52 am

Asia turns on the taps for tech funding

By Josh Noble in Hong Kong

When the bosses of US video messaging app Tango were on the lookout for a strategic partner, they turned in the direction of Hangzhou, China – home of ecommerce company Alibaba.

Within weeks, Tango’s founders met with Alibaba’s executive vice chairman Joe Tsai, before selling a quarter of the company for $215m.

Deals like this, where Asian capital goes into a young tech company from another part of the globe, are becoming increasingly common. The region is emerging as a key source of funding for the sector, putting Hong Kong and Singapore firmly on the map for tech startups seeking cash. Read more of this post

Robots will not eat the jobs but will unleash our creativity; Tech revolution has put the means of production within everyone’s grasp, says Marc Andreessen

June 23, 2014 5:25 pm

Robots will not eat the jobs but will unleash our creativity

By Marc Andreessen

Tech revolution has put the means of production within everyone’s grasp, says Marc Andreessen

Agrowing number of people seem to fear that robots will eat all the jobs. Their worry boils down to this: computers can increasingly replace human labour thus displacing jobs and creating unemployment. Your job, and every job, will go to a machine.

It is textbook Luddism, relying on a “lump of labour” fallacy – the idea that there is a fixed amount of work to be done in the world by humans. The counterargument comes from economists such as Milton Friedman, who believe that human wants and needs are infinite, which means there is always more to do. Read more of this post

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