Competence, Creativity, Mastery, Genius: The Essential Role Of Risk

Competence, Creativity, Mastery, Genius: The Essential Role Of Risk

01/04/2014 16:52 -0500

Submitted by Charles Hugh-Smith of OfTwoMinds blog,

When risk vanishes, so does creativity.

Which characteristics lead to success? Which lead to greatness? Let’s start by pondering companies that were once dominant in their respective fields: Microsoft and Nokia. Microsoft recently bought Nokia’s mobile phone business, once valued at $240 billion, for $7.2 billion. Nokia’s share of the global smart-phone business is around 4%. Microsoft’s share of the global smart-phone software market is less than 1%, despite spending billions of dollars developing and promoting its mobile software. Read more of this post

Use your head when going with your gut; When to go with your gut instinct; How to make on-the-spot decisions

January 5, 2014 2:08 pm

Use your head when going with your gut

By Rhymer Rigby

In his book Blink, Malcolm Gladwell asserted that snap decisions could be better than decisions made slowly and with considered analysis. Since its publication in 2005, a number of people have come forward to argue that this is not the case or that only some (usually trivial) categories of decision are suited to being made without much thought. Detractors include Michael LeGault, author of the book Think. Read more of this post

Don’t Abandon Innovation — Simplify It

Don’t Abandon Innovation — Simplify It

by Ron Ashkenas  |   8:00 AM January 6, 2014

My fellow HBR blogger Bill Taylor recently made a pitch for all of us to stop using the word “innovation” in 2014.  Despite his plea, I suspect this word isn’t going anywhere.  It’s too important as a driver of growth and renewal. What can be done, in the spirit of Bill’s admonishment, is to stop getting tangled up in all of the variations, nuances, tools, techniques, models, frameworks, and paradigms of innovation.  Somehow we’ve taken a simple concept — the idea of systematically finding, encouraging, and implementing new ideas for growth — and we’ve made it horribly complex.  And of course, by complexifying innovation, we’ve probably started to kill it. Read more of this post

Here’s Why Eliminating Titles And Managers At Zappos Probably Won’t Work

Here’s Why Eliminating Titles And Managers At Zappos Probably Won’t Work

ALISON GRISWOLD

52 MINUTES AGO 362

As you’ve probably heard by now, Zappos is in for a radical restructuring.

The online retailer is nixing all job titles and managers as it shifts to a super-flat structure known as “Holacracy.” When CEO Tony Hsieh first announced the shake up in November, he described Holacracy as a “self-governing” system that would boost transparency and streamline operations, Quartz reported. In the place of bosses and managers, Zappos will create hundreds of committee-like “circles” filled by employees.  Read more of this post

Zappos and the collapse of corporate hierarchies; Online shoe retailer Zappos’ plan highlights pros and cons of a manager-less system

January 6, 2014 4:29 pm

Zappos and the collapse of corporate hierarchies

By Andrew Hill

Online shoe retailer Zappos’ plan highlights pros and cons of a manager-less system

You come back from holiday to find your chief executive has given up power to a central constitution. Your team has been disbanded and your title scrapped. You are now all partners, each with an agreed role and a duty to support others whose work overlaps yours. Instead of allowing tension to fester internally, you will raise problems openly at regular meetings that promote positive action. Read more of this post

The Relationship Between Anxiety and Performance

The Relationship Between Anxiety and Performance

by Scott Stossel  |   11:00 AM January 6, 2014

I choked.

It was just a middle-school tennis match against a manifestly worse player, but I became overwhelmed with anxiety. Before we’d started, the most important thing was to win. But during the match, I just wanted to get off the court fast. Burping uncontrollably, afraid of throwing up, I hit balls out. I hit them into the net. I double-faulted. And I lost 6-1, 6-0. After shaking hands and running off the court, I felt immediate relief. My distended stomach settled. My anxiety relented. And then self-loathing took over. This was a challenge match for a lower-ladder JV position. The stakes were low, but to me they felt existentially high. I’d lost to the overweight and oleaginous Paul (not his real name), and the result was there on the score sheet, and on the ladder hanging on the locker room wall, for all to see. Read more of this post

When Human Judgment Works Well, and When it Doesn’t

When Human Judgment Works Well, and When it Doesn’t

by Andrew McAfee  |   10:00 AM January 6, 2014

My last post here, the descriptively-titled “Big Data’s Biggest Challenge? Convincing People NOT to Trust Their Judgment,” generated a fair amount of commentary. So I think it’s worthwhile to devote a couple follow-on posts to the reactions, questions, and objections raised in response to my contention, which was (and is) that we should generally be relying a lot less on the judgments, diagnoses, and forecasts of human ‘experts,’ and a lot more on the outputs of cold, hard, data-driven algorithms. Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: