5 Principles Successful People Follow: Follow your talents; Focus your quest; Limit your options; Work toward meaningful goals; Never give up

5 Principles Successful People Follow

ADAM TORENENTREPRENEUR
JAN. 17, 2014, 4:43 PM 2,768

Depending on who you ask, success means different things. If you were to ask me, I’d say it means having a career that revolves around my real life. If you were to ask my cat, she’d say it involves finding a way to catch, immobilize and destroy her own tail. The first step in achieving success is often deciding what it means to you. Follow your talents.Chances are your answer is similar to mine. But whatever your version of success, people who want to be successful should mimic the behaviors of the great ones who came before them. These behaviors include:

It’s helpful to be passionate about your pursuits, but passion without talent is like a car without a full tank of gas — it won’t get you as far as you want to go. The book “The Element” discusses this: no matter what you are good at — whether it’s writing, drawing, computer coding or motivational speaking — focus on that area and keep pursuing it. Everyone has a gift, so find yours and put in the time to make yourself better at it.

Focus your quest.

In this day and age, the quest for greatness in one area has taken a backseat to the concept of universal genius, or the ability to accomplish greatness in many areas. While a nice notion, this quest for universal genius is one that is destined to fail. The reason is simple: no one can be the best at everything. Even in areas that are related, it’s often impossible to find an equally great level of success (see: Michael Jordan’s MLB career). So the road to success for some can be this simple: focus your quest on one big goal, and remember that a jack-of-all-trades is usually a master of none.

Limit your options.

“Keep your options open” almost seems to be our country’s motto; I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s someday etched on the national currency. Our affinity for keeping options open unfortunately leads us to limit ourselves because it paves a road to mediocrity, rather than one to success.

Think about it this way: the person who goes to college knowing a job is waiting for them if they fail will never work as hard as the person whose only chance at success relies on their academic record. By limiting your options, you go all in, and force yourself to give your utmost effort to achieve a goal. Having a security blanket is important, so creating a backup plan can be worthwhile. However, making a commitment to one path or goal can also lead you to try harder — and potentially be more successful in your efforts.

Work toward meaningful goals.

In Stephen Covey’s book, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” Covey researched the difference between the average person and the extraordinary person. He found that those who were able to achieve greatly understood the difference between efficiency and effectiveness.

Most people are obsessed with efficiency, which leads them to work towards goals that are meaningless, empty or simply unimportant. Effectiveness, on the other hand, is not about getting as much done as possible in a limited amount of time; rather, it’s about getting things accomplished that matter. Sending out 100 emails in an hour may be efficient, but it’s only effective if those emails are going to help you reach your goal. If they’re not, skip them (and avoid carpal tunnel in the process).

Never give up.

If you are 5 foot 3 inches, slow and have a vertical leap that involves negative numbers, giving up on your goal to make the NBA is probably a smart move. But if you have a goal that is achievable through actual talent and hard work, don’t give up — ever. You will make mistakes, and you will fail. So keep practicing, learning, accepting rejection and trying again.

The vast majority of successful people were also huge failures at one point in their lives: Walt Disney went bankrupt, Benjamin Franklin dropped out of school at age 10 and Theodor Geisel (better known as Dr. Seuss) had his first book rejected by 27 publishers. Success comes from hard work, resilience and determination. No one gets it for free … unless, of course, you’re a Kardashian.

About bambooinnovator
Kee Koon Boon (“KB”) is the co-founder and director of HERO Investment Management which provides specialized fund management and investment advisory services to the ARCHEA Asia HERO Innovators Fund (www.heroinnovator.com), the only Asian SMID-cap tech-focused fund in the industry. KB is an internationally featured investor rooted in the principles of value investing for over a decade as a fund manager and analyst in the Asian capital markets who started his career at a boutique hedge fund in Singapore where he was with the firm since 2002 and was also part of the core investment committee in significantly outperforming the index in the 10-year-plus-old flagship Asian fund. He was also the portfolio manager for Asia-Pacific equities at Korea’s largest mutual fund company. Prior to setting up the H.E.R.O. Innovators Fund, KB was the Chief Investment Officer & CEO of a Singapore Registered Fund Management Company (RFMC) where he is responsible for listed Asian equity investments. KB had taught accounting at the Singapore Management University (SMU) as a faculty member and also pioneered the 15-week course on Accounting Fraud in Asia as an official module at SMU. KB remains grateful and honored to be invited by Singapore’s financial regulator Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) to present to their top management team about implementing a world’s first fact-based forward-looking fraud detection framework to bring about benefits for the capital markets in Singapore and for the public and investment community. KB also served the community in sharing his insights in writing articles about value investing and corporate governance in the media that include Business Times, Straits Times, Jakarta Post, Manual of Ideas, Investopedia, TedXWallStreet. He had also presented in top investment, banking and finance conferences in America, Italy, Sydney, Cape Town, HK, China. He has trained CEOs, entrepreneurs, CFOs, management executives in business strategy & business model innovation in Singapore, HK and China.

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