Astrophysics: A telescope at the South Pole has made the biggest cosmological discovery so far this century

Astrophysics: A telescope at the South Pole has made the biggest cosmological discovery so far this century
Mar 22nd 2014 | From the print edition
ONE useful feature of a scientific theory is that it makes testable predictions. Such predictions, though, do not have to be testable straight away. Physics is replete with prophecies that could be confirmed or denied only decades later, once the technology to examine them had caught up. The Higgs boson, for example, was 50 years in the confirming. Read more of this post

IMF’s Property Tax Hike Proposal Comes True With UK Imposing “Mansion Tax” As Soon As This Year

IMF’s Property Tax Hike Proposal Comes True With UK Imposing “Mansion Tax” As Soon As This Year
Tyler Durden on 03/22/2014 09:50 -0400
One could see this one coming from a mile away.
It was a week ago that we highlighted the latest implied IMF proposal on how to reduce income inequality, quietly highlighted in its paper titled “Fiscal Policy and Income Inequality”. The key fragment in the paper said the following: Read more of this post

Howard Lindzon’s key to investing: “The key to investing in general is not to chase”

Howard Lindzon’s key to investing
BY CARMEL DEAMICIS
ON MARCH 20, 2014
If you’re going to take stock market investing tips from anyone in the tech world, Lindzon might be the guy. He’s a Wall Street fanatic who runs a hedge fund and founded two companies in finance — one that was a business news satire show, and the other that is a Twitter-like platform for dishing on the stock market. Read more of this post

Autodesk has found new life with the maker revolution. (It just took a while)

Autodesk has found new life with the maker revolution. (It just took a while)
BY JAMES ROBINSON
ON MARCH 19, 2014
Autodesk CEO Carl Bass first saw a 3D printer in the mid-1980s. He was the head of his own computer graphics company then and was invited down to a factory to check one out. He expected to walk into a full industrial warehouse and instead found an empty space with a 3D printer the size of a soda machine whirring away in the middle. Read more of this post

Shiller: The Global Economy’s Tale Risks; Fluctuations in the world’s economies are largely due to the stories we hear and tell about them

ROBERT J. SHILLER
MAR 20, 2014
The Global Economy’s Tale Risks
TOKYO – Fluctuations in the world’s economies are largely due to the stories we hear and tell about them. These popular, emotionally relevant narratives sometimes inspire us to go out and spend, start businesses, build new factories and office buildings, and hire employees; at other times, they put fear in our hearts and impel us to sit tight, save our resources, curtail spending, and reduce risk. They either stimulate our “animal spirits” or muffle them. Read more of this post

HelloSign: The startup that doesn’t want to revolutionize the world; HelloSign offers a mundane enterprise task – legal document signing online; had a new feature that no one in the world would care about – integration with Google Docs

HelloSign: The startup that doesn’t want to revolutionize the world
BY CARMEL DEAMICIS
ON MARCH 21, 2014
The perfect storm of a boring pitch came together in my inbox the other day. A startup calledHelloSign that offers a mundane enterprise task — legal document signing online — had a new feature that no one in the world would care about — integration with Google Docs. It’s the sort of pitch reporters find themselves falling asleep halfway through reading, hitting the delete button with their nose as they pass out on their laptops. Read more of this post

“Netflix for LEGOs” is an awesome idea. But can it scale?

“Netflix for LEGOs” is an awesome idea. But can it scale?
BY DAVID HOLMES
ON MARCH 21, 2014
Today some big news came out from one of the most brilliant “Netflix for X” experiments I’ve ever seen: Netflix for LEGOs.
The company is called Pley (formerly PleyGo) and it just announced a $6.75 million Series A round led by Allegro Venture Partners. (Fortune reported the news yesterday). Since launching last April, the company says it’s sold over 15,000 subscriptions and shipped more than 75,000 sets. Read more of this post

South Korea’s public debt surpassed $841.7 billion in 2013, the highest level in history

Public debt hits all-time high last year
2014.03.19 16:43:37
South Korea’s public debt surpassed $841.7 billion in 2013, the highest level in history.
But the increase in public debt halved from a year ago.
The central and local governments owed 496.6 trillion won as of last year, and 45 non-financial state-owned companies either financed by the government or led by chiefs appointed by the government had to repay 412.1 trillion won, excluding shareholdings and investments, according to the Bank of Korea’s economic data system Wednesday. Read more of this post

Korean President Park to visit Germany; After Park’s father visited Germany, Korea’s per capita GDP soared from $80 to $24,000 and the aggregate GDP reached $1.1 trillion

President to visit Germany
Kim Seon-gul, Lee Sang-duk
2014.03.21 15:26:05
South Korean President Park Geun-hye is scheduled to make a four-day state visit to Germany from March 25.
Germany provided a textbook example for the incumbent President and her father, former President Park Chung-hee. After Park’s father visited Germany, Korea’s per capita gross domestic product (GDP) soared from $80 to $24,000 and the aggregate GDP reached $1.1 trillion as of last year, coming in at 15th in the world. Read more of this post

“Forging meaning is about changing yourself, building identity is about changing the world”

Forge meaning, build identity: Andrew Solomon at TED2014
Posted by: Thu-Huong Ha
March 21, 2014 at 4:30 pm PDT
The extraordinary and eloquent Andrew Solomon closes TED2014 with a talk that brought the theater to its feet. Popular wisdom, begins Solomon, is that we find meaning, that it is an external truth to seek. But after a lifetime as a student of adversity, he has found that meaning, in fact, is forged. Read more of this post

Lessons From Lincoln: 5 Leadership Tips History And Science Agree On

MARCH 21, 2014 by ERIC BARKER
Lessons From Lincoln: 5 Leadership Tips History And Science Agree On
Abraham Lincoln gets a lot of credit for being a great leader. And he deserves it, but…
Frankly, most of us don’t really know why he deserves it.
What made him such an extraordinary leader? And does modern research back up his methods?
Here’s what Honest Abe did, why it works and how it can make you a better leader. Read more of this post

Supermarkets fighting losing battle with e-commerce in China

Supermarkets fighting losing battle with e-commerce in China
Staff Reporter
2014-03-17
The growing popularity of e-commerce in China has now taken business away even from traditional supermarkets, whose annual gross margins have posted annualized declines, according to the Beijing Youth Daily. Read more of this post

New standards for bottled water may affect Tingyi, Coca-Cola

New standards for bottled water may affect Tingyi, Coca-Cola
Staff Reporter
2014-03-22
China’s National Health and Family Planning Commission is soliciting opinion regarding new standards for bottled drinking water, which may not be good news for companies that market their products under the guise of “mineral water,” Shanghai’s National Business Daily reports. Read more of this post

The Latest Fad In Education? It’s become the new buzz phrase in education: “Got grit?” Does Teaching Kids To Get ‘Gritty’ Help Them Get Ahead?

Does Teaching Kids To Get ‘Gritty’ Help Them Get Ahead?
by TOVIA SMITH
March 17, 2014 5:00 AM
It’s become the new buzz phrase in education: “Got grit?”
Around the nation, schools are beginning to see grit as key to students’ success — and just as important to teach as reading and math. Read more of this post

Why Apple should make its own TV shows, just like Netflix

Why Apple should make its own TV shows, just like Netflix
By John McDuling @jmcduling 2 hours ago
Netflix is doing it. So is Sony. And Yahoo. Even Amazon is getting in on the act. Microsoft has been doing it for years. Acquiring or producing exclusive content, that is.
Now, as it confronts slowing growth in the sales of its devices, maybe it’s something Apple should consider as well. Read more of this post

One more time: Why do we listen to our favourite music over and over again? Because repeated sounds work magic in our brains

One more time: Why do we listen to our favourite music over and over again? Because repeated sounds work magic in our brains
by Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis 2,700 words
Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis is director of the music cognition lab at the University of Arkansas, a trained concert pianist, and the author of On Repeat: How Music Plays the Mind (2013). Read more of this post

Wesley Gray: Is Smart Beta Bullsh!+?

Is Smart Beta Bullsh!+?
Posted MAR 21 2014 by DAVID FOULKE in TURNKEY BRAINWAVE
John Bogle did a tremendous service to humanity when he launched the first index fund in 1975. By providing people with a passive, low-cost way to invest in the entire stock market, Bogle enabled generations of investors to get cheap beta exposure, and avoid the high fees, commissions, taxes, and other costs associated with active management approaches. Clearly, consumers thought this was a good idea. The firm he founded, the Vanguard Group, now manages approximately $2.75 trillion. Read more of this post

The Dismal Art: Economic forecasting has become much more sophisticated in the decades since its invention. So why are we still so bad at it?

The Dismal Art: Economic forecasting has become much more sophisticated in the decades since its invention. So why are we still so bad at it?
James Surowiecki
Fortune Tellers: The Story of America’s First Economic Forecasters By Walter A. Friedman • Princeton University Press • 2013 • 268 pages • $29.95
We live in an age that’s drowning in economic forecasts. Banks, investment firms, government agencies: On a near-daily basis, these institutions are making public predictions about everything from the unemployment rate to GDP growth to where stock prices are headed this year. Big companies, meanwhile, employ sizable planning departments that are supposed to help them peer into the future. And the advent of what’s often called Big Data is only adding to the forecast boom, with the field of “predictive analytics” promising that it can reveal what we’ll click on and what we’ll buy. Read more of this post

Amazon is good for customers. But is it good for books?

Amazon is good for customers. But is it good for books?
BY GEORGE PACKERFEBRUARY 17, 2014
In the era of the Kindle, a book costs the same price as a sandwich. Dennis Johnson, an independent publisher, says that “Amazon has successfully fostered the idea that a book is a thing of minimal value—it’s a widget.” Construction by Ian Wright. Read more of this post

The man who destroyed America’s ego: How a rebel psychologist challenged one of the 20th century’s biggest-and most dangerous-ideas

The man who destroyed America’s ego
How a rebel psychologist challenged one of the 20th century’s biggest—and most dangerous—ideas
Will Storr in Matter
FOR MUCH OF HUMAN HISTORY, our beliefs have been based on the assumption that people are fundamentally bad. Strip away a person’s smile and you’ll find a grotesque, writhing animal-thing. Human instincts have to be controlled, and religions have often been guides for containing the demons. Sigmund Freud held a similar view: Psychotherapy was his method of making the unconscious conscious, helping people restrain their bestial desires and accord with the moral laws of civilization.
In the middle of the 20th century, an alternative school of thought appeared. It was popularized by Carl Rogers, an influential psychotherapist at the University of Chicago, and it reversed the presumption of original sin. Rogers argued that people are innately decent. Children, he believed, should be raised in an environment of “unconditional positive regard”. They should be liberated from the inhibitions and restraints that prevented them from attaining their full potential. Read more of this post

Are China’s ‘ghost’ cities building towards economic ruin?

Are China’s ‘ghost’ cities building towards economic ruin?
March 22, 2014
Philip Wen
Demons are lurking behind China’s unprecedented housing projects.
Fears of property oversupply in China’s poorest province
Massive urban redevelopment projects in Guizhou are prompting fears of massive oversupply and fears that its capital, Guiyang will be left a ghost city. Read more of this post

World’s Best CEOs: Members of our exclusive club share a high regard for innovation, growth, and shareholder return. Who’s in and who’s out on our 10th annual list

SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014
World’s Best CEOs
By ANDREW BARY | MORE ARTICLES BY AUTHOR
Members of our exclusive club share a high regard for innovation, growth, and shareholder return. Who’s in and who’s out on our 10th annual list. Read more of this post

Energy debate challenges facade of wa

Energy debate challenges facade of wa
BY STEPHEN HESSE
MAR 22, 2014
Torn between his nationalistic instinct to resurrect what he seems to regard as Japan’s great bygone days of empire-building and the mundane demands of caring for the pressing needs of his nation, a remarkably caring soul might almost feel sorry for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during his first months in office. Almost. Read more of this post

The road ahead looks much smoother for restructured auto supplier Visteon, as a simplified strategy promises to end years of disappointing results

SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014
Visteon: In the Driver’s Seat
By CHRISTOPHER C. WILLIAMS | MORE ARTICLES BY AUTHOR
The road ahead looks much smoother for restructured auto supplier Visteon, as a simplified strategy promises to end years of disappointing results.
When Tim Leuliette emerged from the boardroom to lead Visteon in August 2012, the auto supplier had swerved into a ditch. Two years out of bankruptcy, it had run through a chief executive, and its stock was languishing in the $30s, after trading as high as $75 the year before. Hedge funds and “special situation” investors were agitating for management to sell assets or even the whole company to boost the share price.
Soon after Leuliette became CEO, one such investor, anxious to cash out, asked him, “Can you get the stock to $50?” Leuliette’s reply: “It’s not important that I sell assets to get to $50. I can get you to $50, $60, or $70. There is a strategy here. Give us time.”
image002-4 image001-15 Read more of this post

Tencent and Alibaba battle for internet dominance in China

18 March 2014 Last updated at 20:01
Tencent and Alibaba battle for internet dominance in China
By Kim GittlesonBBC business reporter, Singapore
It’s been called “the most expensive competition in online history” – but it’s one you might not have heard about.
More than 15 years ago, two firms launched in China within months of each other, looking to take advantage of the growing numbers of internet users in the country. Read more of this post

TED turns 30 with new chapter of ‘ideas worth spreading’

TED turns 30 with new chapter of ‘ideas worth spreading’
Saturday, 22 March, 2014, 4:25pm
Agence France-Presse in Vancouver
TED turns 30 years old with a mind-sizzling mix of intrigue, wonder and passion in the renowned gathering’s new home in Canada.
A conference born in California in 1984 that grew into a global forum for heady “ideas worth spreading” ended Friday after gazing thoughtfully at the past and looking optimistically ahead. Read more of this post

Breaking the third-generation curse in the family businesses; professionalisation can be easily executed but it can dilute family capital

Breaking the third-generation curse in the family businesses
The Nation
March 22, 2014 1:00 am
Wanchalerm: In the third generation, professionalisation can be easily executed but it can dilute family capital. Family businesses must place emphasis on managing family capital to ensure that the business becomes self-sustaining across generations. Read more of this post

The co-innovation sweet spot; Companies pursuing a strategy of co-innovation can mess up in two ways: changing too little or changing too much

The co-innovation sweet spot
Howard Yu and Jean-Louis Barsoux, The Jakarta Post | Business | Sat, March 22 2014, 12:58 PM
Companies pursuing a strategy of co-innovation can mess up in two ways: changing too little or changing too much
Shifting industry boundaries mean that change is happening faster and coming at us from all directions. It is becoming harder to keep up by innovating alone. Read more of this post

One of America’s Largest Hospitals Brings Google Glass Into the ER

ONE OF AMERICA’S LARGEST HOSPITALS BRINGS GOOGLE GLASS INTO THE ER
BOSTON’S BETH ISRAEL DEACONNESS MEDICAL CENTER, ONE OF AMERICA’S LARGEST HOSPITALS, IS TESTING GOOGLE GLASS IN THEIR ER SO DOCTORS DON’T HAVE TO BREAK EYE CONTACT WITH PATIENTS WHILE TREATING THEM.
BY NEAL UNGERLEIDER
Patients at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center (BIDMC) might notice something different if they end up in the emergency room: Their doctors wear Google Glass. The huge hospital is at the forefront of a movement that uses augmented reality technology to improve service, efficiency, and comfort in the waiting room. Since December 2013, four ER doctors have been sporting neon, hunter’s-orange Google Glasses on the job–and more than 10 other clinicians have been participating in testing Google Glass out. Read more of this post

Why the Dollar Endures: The U.S. currency’s wide appeal owes much to the weaknesses of the global monetary system

Why the Dollar Endures
By ESWAR S. PRASADMARCH 21, 2014

image001-11

ITHACA, N.Y. — Why hasn’t the dollar plunged?
Since the 2007-8 global financial crisis, the public debt of the United States government has soared to $17.4 trillion, roughly equivalent to America’s annual gross domestic product. The Federal Reserve has pumped more than $1 trillion into the economy in an attempt to spur lending — and, in effect, weaken the dollar. Uncle Sam’s credit rating was downgraded, for the first time ever, in 2011. Round after round of fighting over the debt ceiling led to a government shutdown last October. Bitter gridlock has made it difficult for America to get its fiscal house in order. Read more of this post

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