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The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes – and Why; Gumption: Relighting the Torch of Freedom with America’s Gutsiest Troublemakers – Bamboo Innovator Daily: 6 Jun (Sat)

Life

  • 5 Lessons from a Dog on Overcoming Life’s Hardest Challenges: TinyBuddha
  • Warren Buffett On How Business And Philanthropy Are Alike — And How They Are Completely Different: Forbes
  • Merck, the modest family: Chairman shares secrets of successful family management over more than 300 years: KH
  • Solutions for infighting among Asian business families: SCMP
  • Inside the successes and failures of a growing doggy empire; The mastermind behind the popular BarkBox subscription care package for dogs shares his hard-earned startup lessons. FastCo
  • Maree Machin lost a $2000 camera, but gained a business idea: BRW
  • Wal-Mart founder: ‘Everything I’ve done I’ve copied from someone else’: BI
  • Alan Bond: a deal-making dynamo gone wrong: TheAge
  • Shanghai master’s student controls cockroaches with ‘brain link’: WCT
  • When political pollsters get it wrong: The £2bn market research industry failed to predict the election result. Does the answer lie in asking fewer questions?: FT
  • This Japanese company taught a robot to wield a katana like a master swordsman: YouTube, BI
  • Daphne Koller on the Future of Online Education: The Coursera co-founder on the advantages of learning online—and why traditional universities aren’t going to disappear: WSJ

Books

  • Gumption: Relighting the Torch of Freedom with America’s Gutsiest Troublemakers: Amazon
  • The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes – and Why : Amazon

Investing Process

  • SEC secures $190m from Computer Sciences Corp over accounting fraud and the return of $3.7m in compensation from its former CEO for manipulating financial results related to the company’s multibillion-dollar contract with Britain’s NHS: FT
  • Why did Buffett change Berkshire’s depreciation schedule to a double-declining method after gaining control of Berkshire Hathaway in 1965?: SCMessina
  • Stock Buybacks That Hurt Shareholders: NYT
  •  Can auditors be insightful, transparent?; Star
  • 5 things you didn’t know about the Fortune 500: Fortune
  • SEC May Seek More Information from Audit Committees: WSJ

Greater China

  • Banking on a Remote Future for Chinese Homes; Companies from Haier to Alibaba are scrambling for a piece of the emerging smart home automation market; Caixin
  • Firms in China flock to smart home business: WCT
  • Firms in China seeking shell companies in Hong Kong: WCT
  • Taiwan Approves 45% Property Gains Tax to Stamp Out Speculation: Bloomberg

Japan & Korea

  • Japan’s Peter Pan Problem: Bloomberg
  • Pension Fund Could Be Samsung Kingmaker: WSJ
  • Franchise bakeries look beyond Korean market; Almost ubiquitous in Seoul, bakery chains seek higher growth overseas: KH
  • Foreign ownership surges at big Japanese companies: Nikkei
  • Hedge-Fund Managers in Asia Bullish on Japan Efforts to Improve Returns: WSJ

ASEAN

  • A trade body’s Singapore story: BT

Macro

  • Apple Is the New Pimco, and Tim Cook Is the New King of Bonds: Bloomberg
  • 400 Billion Reasons Why Ebbing Currency Reserves Threaten Bonds: Bloomberg
  • Miami’s Hot Condo Market Cools as Dollar Derails Buyers: Bloomberg
  • Anthony Atkinson, the godfather of inequality research, on a growing problem: Economist
  • Why buying airports has taken off: Economist
  • SEC Probes Activist Funds Over Whether They Secretly Acted in Concert: WSJ
  • The New Rules of Offshore Accounts: Deadlines are looming for U.S. taxpayers who live abroad or have other global financial ties. Here are tips on avoiding pitfalls. WSJ
  • eBay for stock-pickers: trading tips for sale online: Reuters

Energy & Commodities

  • $1b Cocoa Processing Investments Stuck on Limited Supply: JG

TMT

  • Amazon, Google race to get your DNA into the cloud: Reuters
  • In ‘year of Apple Pay’, many top retailers remain skeptical: Reuters
  • This 20-year-old college dropout turned down Apple to launch a startup and is doing really well: BI
  • Siri would be a million times better if Apple bought this company: BI
  •  What We Know From A Decade Of SaaS: Techcrunch
  • Is Translation an Art or a Math Problem?: NYT
  • Selling E-Commerce While Avoiding Amazon: NYT
  • Apple’s plan to rethink pricing formula is overdue; The 70/30 split for digital content always felt like a rough-and-ready decision: FT
  • Apple looks beyond iTunes with launch of its streaming service: FT
  • Etsy Leans on Machine Learning to Help You Find Just the Right Bedazzled Wallet: WSJ

Healthcare

  • 5 terrible illnesses that genetic engineering could eliminate forever: BI
  • Cancer treatment: Healing powers; The pharmaceuticals industry is in a bullish mood over immunotherapies: FT

Consumer & Others

  • Behind Retailer Jeronimo Martins’s Ascent Is an Unassuming Woman: bloomberg
  • How Wal-Mart is hoping to change grocery shopping: WaPo
  • From hardware to hard work in Bendigo for Woolworths’ Masters: TheAge
  • Wal-Mart loses about 1% of its US revenue — or roughly $3 billion dollars every year — to stealing by customers and employees: Reuters
  • Costco might surpass Whole Foods as the nation’s top seller of organic food: BI
  • Rob Walton’s exit marks Walmart milestone; For the first time in its 53-year history, there will no longer be a chairman with the Walton name at Walmart.: FT
  • Corning’s Latest Magic: Turning Glass Into Cash; A famed glassmaker’s bet on 4K ultrahigh-definition TVs could reward investors with a 40% gain.: Barron’s
  • How Iceland’s airlines have helped spur a tourism boom, lifting its battered economy back to health: FP
  • Walmart’s CEO calls on staff to be like Han Solo, other Star Wars rebels; The retail giant’s CEO has called on store workers to shed Walmart’s bureaucracy as it looks to re-ignite store growth.: Fortune
  • A private equity gamble in Vegas gone wrong: How buyout giants Apollo and TPG lost big (and made hedge fund enemies) by betting on Caesars Entertainment.: Fortune
  • Years ago, PepsiCo’s Indra Nooyi made an audacious strategy shift beyond unhealthy snacks and drinks. She was prescient—as well as disciplined and tough—but the challenges are still daunting.: Fortune
  •  Olive Garden’s Hedge Fund Bosses Waited Tables to Aid Turnaround: Bloomberg
  • Private Equity Firms Are Increasingly Using Captive Insurance Companies: Forbes
  • Yummy Financial Engineering Returns Anyone? “Prominent activists are recommending that Yum Brands optimize its structure” by spinning off its China business, so that YUM can essentially become a franchisee company: Forbes
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About bambooinnovator
KB Kee is the Managing Editor of the Moat Report Asia (www.moatreport.com), a research service focused exclusively on highlighting undervalued wide-moat businesses in Asia; subscribers from North America, Europe, the Oceania and Asia include professional value investors with over $20 billion in asset under management in equities, some of the world’s biggest secretive global hedge fund giants, and savvy private individual investors who are lifelong learners in the art of value investing. KB has been rooted in the principles of value investing for over a decade as an analyst in Asian capital markets. He was head of research and fund manager at a Singapore-based value investment firm. As a member of the investment committee, he helped the firm’s Asia-focused equity funds significantly outperform the benchmark index. He was previously the portfolio manager for Asia-Pacific equities at Korea’s largest mutual fund company. KB has trained CEOs, entrepreneurs, CFOs, management executives in business strategy, value investing, macroeconomic and industry trends, and detecting accounting frauds in Singapore, HK and China. KB was a faculty (accounting) at SMU teaching accounting courses. KB is currently the Chief Investment Officer at an ASX-listed investment holdings company since September 2015, helping to manage the listed Asian equities investments in the Hidden Champions Fund. Disclaimer: This article is for discussion purposes only and does not constitute an offer, recommendation or solicitation to buy or sell any investments, securities, futures or options. All articles in the website reflect the personal opinions of the writer.

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