Advertisements

The Agility Factor: A few large companies in every industry show consistently superior profitability relative to their peers, and they all have one thing in common: a highly developed capacity to adapt their business to change

April 15, 2013

The Agility Factor

A few large companies in every industry show consistently superior profitability relative to their peers, and they all have one thing in common: a highly developed capacity to adapt their business to change.

by Thomas Williams, Christopher G. Worley, and Edward E. Lawler III

Everybody knows that big corporations, by nature, maneuver like battleships. Held back by their own inertia and current business strategies, they cannot turn quickly when the competitive environment changes. Everybody also knows that high performance, as measured by shareholder returns, is impossible to sustain over the long term; no company consistently beats the market.

But a recent in-depth study of long-term performance suggests an alternative point of view about business strategy. When the measure of performance is profitability, a few large companies in every industry consistently outperform their peers over extended periods. And they maintain this performance edge even in the face of significant business change in their competitive environments. The one factor they seem to have in common is agility. They adapt to business change more quickly and reliably than their competitors; they have found a way to turn as quickly as speedboats when necessary.

00188_ex02 Read more of this post

Advertisements

Counterfeit goods, mainly from China, have become as profitable for Asia’s criminal gangs as illegal drug trafficking, the United Nations said

April 16, 2013, 1:58 a.m. ET

Fake Goods Rival Drug Profits for Asia’s Criminals

By CAROLINE HENSHAW

SYDNEY—Counterfeit goods, mainly from China, have become as profitable for Asia’s criminal gangs as illegal drug trafficking, the United Nations said in a report published Tuesday.

The U.N.’s Office on Drugs and Crime, or UNODC, looked into international organized crime across much of the Asia-Pacific region. Its report, the first ever published by the agency on the topic, catalogues how rapid economic growth has led to the proliferation of criminal networks profiting from illegal trade in goods and people.

A surge in Asia’s exports, which have nearly quadrupled in the past decade or so to $5 trillion, according to the World Trade Organization, has been accompanied by a rise in the trafficking of fake-branded products including handbags and medicines, the U.N. report found. Read more of this post

Chinese billionaires nervous about BVI revelations exposed by journalists

Chinese billionaires nervous about BVI revelations: report

Staff Reporter, 2013-04-16

An in-depth report on global tax havens has made many wealthy individuals across the globe anxious due to the increasing possibility that their overseas fortunes will be exposed by journalists, reports the Guangzhou-based 21st Century Business Herald.

Reports by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists said hundreds of thousands of billionaires around the world, including many from China, have hidden their wealth in territories like the Cayman Islands and British Virgin Islands to dodge taxes. While this is hardly a new revelation, the prospect that individuals could be named publicly has caused consternation among those who fear their financial affairs might come under investigation. Read more of this post

Cosmetic brands are targeting soldiers to secure future customers in the growing male cosmetics market

2013-04-15 19:58

Cosmetic brands targeting soldiers

Cosmetic brands are targeting soldiers to secure future customers in the growing male cosmetics market.

Lab Series, a male cosmetic brand affiliated with Estee Lauder, introduced a military membership service dubbed “LS Army,” designed exclusively for soldiers in service.

Those who sign up for membership will receive a 3,000 won telephone coupon with their first purchase. If they buy products worth more than 90,000 won, free delivery to their bases will be offered. The service is available only in Korea where army service is mandatory for all qualified male citizens.

“More Korean men realize they need to take care of their skin in the army, because the skin visibly gets worse with tough army schedules,” said Kimmie Kim, communications manager at Estee Lauder Korea. Read more of this post

Beijing defends ‘new look’ SOEs

April 15, 2013 1:43 pm

Beijing defends ‘new look’ SOEs

By Simon Rabinovitch in Beijing

The voice of the Communist party has defended the role of the state in China’s corporate sector, saying that government-owned companies are competitive on the global stage and paying important dividends to the country.

In a front-page article about the “new look” of state-owned enterprises, the People’s Daily said they were the backbone of the Chinese economy and stronger than at any point in the past two decades. Read more of this post

Fathers struggling to ‘have it all’; Men are reluctant to speak of problems with their work-life balance – but there are remedies

April 15, 2013 3:22 pm

Fathers struggling to ‘have it all’

By Naomi Shragai

A senior television executive is reading a bedtime story to his eight-year-old daughter. It is 10pm and he has just returned home from work. His phone rings – a work call – and he answers it, leaving the story unfinished.

His daughter shouts from her bed: “You’re a terrible father!” He returns to his daughter and tries to explain, with little success, why the call was important.

This executive works late and sees his daughter for only about two hours during the working week. Although he feels guilty about this and fears he is missing the best moments of family life, he seems unable to switch off from work.

This scene will be familiar to many men in senior positions who have have taxing jobs and struggle to respond to respond to the demands of family life. Read more of this post

People Are the New Channel; This new world is disorienting because pipes and people work very differently as channels. Pipes flow out; people flow in. Content is pushed out through pipes, but pulled in through people

People Are the New Channel

by Mark Bonchek and Cara France  |  11:00 AM April 15, 2013

In the past, channels delivered messages to audiences. You either owned the pipe or paid to use someone else’s. You controlled the message all the way through that pipe.

In a digital and social age, pipes are less important. People are the channel. You don’t own or rent them. You can’t control them. You can only serve and support them.

This new world is disorienting because pipes and people work very differently as channels. Pipes flow out; people flow in. Content is pushed out through pipes, but pulled in through people. Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: