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Boy, 6, writes book to save friend’s life

Boy, 6, writes book to save friend’s life

bookchocv

Saturday, Mar 02, 2013
The New Paper

They are the best of friends in primary school.

So when his chum needed help, Dylan Siegel jumped in.

At six, Dylan has produced a 16-page book called Chocolate Bar, a handwritten and illustrated story.

More than two months after putting his book on the market, he has managed to raise more than US$30,000 (S$37,150) from events, sales and donations made through Facebook and online.

The book uses the term chocolate bar as a synonym for awesome.

He came up with his book because his good friend Jonah Pournazarian, seven, suffers from a rare liver disorder with no known cure, the Daily Mail reported. Jonah often eats through a tube, sometimes corn starch or chicken soup with vegetables. Read more of this post

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Buffett: Performance streak may end this year; “To date, we’ve never had a five-year period of underperformance, having managed 43 times to surpass the S&P over such a stretch”: Long-time Berkshire investors said they detected almost a sense of frustration in this year’s letter

Buffett: Performance streak may end this year

12:30am EST

By Ben Berkowitz

(Reuters) – Berkshire Hathaway may end a long streak of outperforming the S&P 500 this year, Chief Executive Warren Buffett warned shareholders on Friday, even as he said he was still eagerly hunting for acquisitions to grow the ice-cream-to-insurance conglomerate.

In his annual letter to investors, Buffett opened up with a caution that this year, for the first time, the growth in Berkshire’s book value per share may underperform the growth in the S&P 500 when measured over a five-year period.

“To date, we’ve never had a five-year period of underperformance, having managed 43 times to surpass the S&P over such a stretch,” he wrote. “But the S&P has now had gains in each of the last four years, outpacing us over that period. If the market continues to advance in 2013, our streak of five-year wins will end.”

Buffett said he expects the growth in Berkshire’s intrinsic business value will over time exceed the S&P’s returns by small margins. But at the same time, he said the firm would continue to underperform in a strong market like this year.

Long-time Berkshire investors said they detected almost a sense of frustration in this year’s letter. Read more of this post

Druckenmiller Sees Storm Worse Than ’08 as Seniors Steal

Druckenmiller Sees Storm Worse Than ’08 as Seniors Steal

Stan Druckenmiller, one of the best- performing hedge fund managers of the past three decades, has a warning for the youth of America: Don’t let your grandparents steal your money.

Druckenmiller, 59, said the mushrooming costs of Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, with unfunded liabilities as high as $211 trillion, will bankrupt the nation’s youth and pose a much greater danger than the country’s $16 trillion of debt currently being debated in Congress.

“While everybody is focusing on the here and now, there’s a much, much bigger storm that’s about to hit,” Druckenmiller said in an hour-long interview with Stephanie Ruhle on Bloomberg Television’s Market Makers. “I am not against seniors. What I am against is current seniors stealing from future seniors.” Read more of this post

Smartphone sales in India may suffer from a higher tax on handsets costing more than $37

Chidambaram Eyes IPhone, Z10 to Plug Budget Gap: Corporate India

Smartphone sales in India may suffer from a higher tax on handsets costing more than $37 just as Apple Inc. (AAPL) steps up efforts to tap demand for data services in the world’s second-largest mobile-phone market.

Finance Minister Palaniappan Chidambaram yesterday said he would raise the excise tax on high-end phones to 6 percent from 1 percent to help finance welfare programs for the country’s poor and fund the widest budget deficit among the largest emerging economies. Samsung Electronics Co. (005930), which sells the Galaxy range of smartphones, said the move “won’t have a positive impact” on the mobile-phone industry and will force customers to pay more.

India’s government, after attempting to squeeze wireless operators including Vodafone Group Plc (VOD) and Bharti Airtel Ltd. (BHARTI) with higher license fees and airwave tariffs, is now targeting handsets for revenue from an industry that has boomed since Prime Minister Manmohan Singh opened the economy more than two decades ago. Chidambaram also increased tax on high earners, luxury cars and yachts. Read more of this post

Treasury Wine Estates Ltd. (TWE), Australia’s largest winemaker, plans to boost Chinese gift sales with trophy products similar to its $168,000 bottle of 2004 Penfolds Cabernet Sauvignon

Treasury Wine Readies China Gifts Modeled on $168,000 Ampul

Treasury Wine Estates Ltd. (TWE), Australia’s largest winemaker, plans to boost Chinese gift sales with trophy products similar to its $168,000 bottle of 2004 Penfolds Cabernet Sauvignon released last year. The Cabernet, contained in a glass ampul mounted inside a wooden cabinet, is “the sort of gifting that we really want to go out there” in Asia, David Dearie, chief executive officer, said in an interview yesterday. Treasury rose to a record today in Sydney trading. The company spent several hundred thousand dollars last year researching China’s wine-buyers, said Dearie. Treasury is using its findings to tailor products to Chinese consumers after success targeting Hispanic drinkers with Beringer’s Los Hermanos label in the U.S., he said. Read more of this post

Why some cells survive strokes while others don’t; “Medical science is often concerned with working out why cells die. We thought we’d look at why some seem to survive.”

Why some cells survive strokes while others don’t

Mar 2nd 2013 |From the print edition

WHEN dealing with a stroke—a loss of blood supply to the brain—time is of the essence. If the cause is a blocked artery, blood flow can often be restored using clot-busting drugs. If those drugs are swallowed too late, however, they can do more harm than good. In one of nature’s crueller ironies, the metabolic changes that take place in cells after about three hours without oxygen or glucose mean that restoring blood flow becomes damaging in itself. This is called a “reperfusion” injury. Doctors have long searched for ways to extend the period during which clot-busting pills might help. They have tried drugs and even artificially induced hypothermia to help the brain protect itself from the consequences of oxygen and sugar deprivation. Now, in a paper inNature Medicine, a group of researchers led by Alastair Buchan, a neurologist at the University of Oxford, describe a new idea. Dr Buchan’s team began with an old medical mystery. It has been known since the 1920s that some nerve cells, or neurons, are more susceptible to stroke damage than others. In particular, a group of neurons called CA3 cells that live in the hippocampus—a seahorse-shaped chunk of brain tissue involved in forming memories—are much hardier than another sort called CA1 cells, even though the two types are neighbours. “Medical science is often concerned with working out why cells die,” says Dr Buchan. “We thought we’d look at why some seem to survive.” The researchers compared versions of both types of cells taken from rats, looking for differences in their chemistry after they had been subjected to an artificial stroke. One conspicuous difference involved a protein called hamartin, which was present in larger amounts in the hardy CA3 cells than in the fragile CA1 cells.  Read more of this post

Wage Recession Hits 5 Years; Worse Than Jobs Drought

Wage Recession Hits 5 Years; Worse Than Jobs Drought

By JED GRAHAM , INVESTOR’S BUSINESS DAILY
Posted 02/28/2013 08:05 AM ET

IBD Wages

As bad as the current job recovery has been — and it’s by far the weakest since World War II — the recovery in wages has been far worse.

Five years after the recession began in December 2007, total wages in the economy have yet to fully recover in real terms, Commerce Department data show. In other words, the wage recession continues. Read more of this post

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