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This Is The Most Innovative Startup From This Year’s Y-Combinator Class; Thalmic Labs positions its MYO armband as the next generation of gesture control, enabling you to control other devices using your movements, and without the need for a camera

This Is The Most Innovative Startup From This Year’s Y-Combinator Class

Megan Rose Dickey | Mar. 27, 2013, 10:41 AM | 3,498 | 2

Silicon Valley’s most prestigious accelerator Y Combinator just hosted its Demo Day for its Winter 2013 class. Even though this class was smaller than its previous batches, the talent was just as good. Out of the 47 startups that presented at YC’s Demo Day, Thalmic Labs really caught our attention. Thalmic Labs positions its MYO armband as the next generation of gesture control, enabling you to control other devices using your movements, and without the need for a camera. Many current gesture control technologies like Microsoft‘s Xbox Kinect, for example, require you to be in front of a camera. It also forces you to use pre-programmed gestures. But with MYO, it can track even the most subtle gestures. The armband works by sensing the electrical activity in your muscles to control your computer, video games, or even a drone. But Thalmic has opened up its API so developers can come up with more ways to use MYO. Already, Thalmic has sold 25,000 MYO devices and brought in $3.7 million in revenue. You can pre-order your own MYO for $149 here.

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How Samsung Became the World’s No. 1 Smartphone Maker

Here’s Bloomberg Businessweek’s Cover About How Samsung Became The King Of Smartphones

Steve Kovach | 59 minutes ago | 18 | 

Bloomberg Businessweek’s cover story this week is all about the rise of Samsung. Here’s a sneak peek at the cover art:

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How Samsung Became the World’s No. 1 Smartphone Maker

By Sam Grobart on March 28, 2013

I’m in a black Mercedes-Benz (DAI) van with three Samsung Electronics PR people heading toward Yongin, a city about 45 minutes south of Seoul. Yongin is South Korea’s Orlando: a nondescript, fast-growing city known for its tourist attractions, especially Everland Resort, the country’s largest theme park. But the van isn’t going to Everland. We’re headed to a far more profitable theme park: the Samsung Human Resources Development Center, where the theme just happens to be Samsung.

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Photograph by Tony Law for Bloomberg BusinessweekSamsung’s Human Resources Development Center

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feat_samsung14_mobile-chart_605 Read more of this post

The Brilliant, Unusual Way Media Startup Upworthy Grew To 10.4 Million Monthly Readers In Its First Year

The Brilliant, Unusual Way Media Startup Upworthy Grew To 10.4 Million Monthly Readers In Its First Year

Alyson Shontell | Mar. 27, 2013, 1:44 PM | 2,680 | 4

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Eli Pariser, co-founder of Upworthy.

Most media companies focus on covering the latest news. Eli Pariser and his army of bloggers at Upworthy don’t, yet they have grown from no readers last year to 10.4 million last month.

If The New York Times is a designer store with new, original items that keep readers informed, Pariser is running an antique shop, recognizing the value in old gems, and selling them for much more.

Essentially, Upworthy goes dumpster diving in the Internet’s archives, hoping to find gold. They’re looking for any scrap of a moving, visual story they can tell that was, for some reason or another, initially overlooked by readers. They polish it off with a catchy headline, send it out into the Twitterverse and Facebook, and watch the readers flock to the page.

When you’re promoting old stories, there’s not much competition either. News sites compete to be the first to a story, so there’s a lot of overlapping coverage. It’d be hard for another site to stumble upon the same older content Upworthy finds at exactly the same time.

To find the hidden gems, Upworthy’s content curators spend a large portion of the day scouring YouTube and other visual sites. They don’t crank out dozens of stories each; Pariser estimates only 60 pieces of content are created per week. Interest, not timeliness, is what matters when it comes to social content.   Read more of this post

Bitcoin Prices Have Gone Utterly Nuclear In The Last Two Days; Back in February, one Bitcoin was trading at around $20. Today? $95

Bitcoin Prices Have Gone Utterly Nuclear In The Last Two Days

Joe Weisenthal | Mar. 28, 2013, 5:30 AM | 4,438 | 18

The price of a Bitcoin, the digital money that’s become the new obsession of gold and silver-types, continues its dizzying assent. Here’s a short term chart. Back in February, one Bitcoin was trading at around $20. Today? $95, having had two huge moves over the last two days.

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26 Tips On How To Read People

26 Tips On How To Read People

Kim Bhasin and Max Nisen | Mar. 27, 2013, 2:18 PM | 192,193 | 1

Few people are so rigidly controlled that they don’t give clues as to what they’re thinking or feeling. Learning to read these can be a big advantage in business and life.

There’s no single, consistent recipe — and even the best mind readers on the planet are only right 80 percent of the time — but there’s a lot to be learned.

According to UCLA professor Albert Mehrabian55 percent of what you convey comes from body language, 38 percent from the tone of your voice, and only 7 percent from what you actually say. 

We’ve compiled tips from Psychology Today and elsewhere that will help you stay one step ahead of everyone else.

To start, always get a baseline reading so you can distinguish personal quirks from real tells.

Notice others trying to read your baseline with seemingly innocuous questions like, “How are you today?” Read more of this post

Cao Shiru, the woman behind Zhongnanhai’s Hongqi supermarket; “In business, it is not enough to be self-possessed, you also need innovation”; Cao gives her staff the freedom to carry out their plans and backs them strongly if she believes that their ideas are right.

Cao Shiru, the woman behind Zhongnanhai’s Hongqi supermarket

Staff Reporter 2013-03-28

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Until its mysterious closure, Hongqi of Chengdu was the only supermarket chain to operate an outlet in Zhongnanhai, the government compound in the heart of Beijing that houses the State Council and the headquarters of the Communist Party.

Despite the setback, the chain’s founder Cao Shiru has proved herself a canny operator in the retail industry, reports the semi-monthly China Entrepreneur.

“The first two characters of my name are pronounced the same as supermarket in Mandarin,” Cao told the magazine, explaining why she has a strong affinity for the retail sector.

Cao’s chain employs over 13,000 workers, and while around 80% of them are female, most of her senior executives are men.

Yu Shi, the company’s deputy general manager, told the magazine that Cao gives her staff the freedom to carry out their plans and backs them strongly if she believes that their ideas are right. Read more of this post

Bubbles and bankruptcy: a British history

Bubbles and bankruptcy: a British history

We review the Bubbles and Bankruptcy exhibition at the British Museum, which charts four hundred years of British bank collapses and the frenzied asset bubbles that all too often beguiled investors.

UK history – as the British Museum reveals in its “Bubbles and Bankruptcy” exhibition – is crammed with examples of wily banking scams, bailouts and asset bubbles.

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Steve Bell’s ‘Bank Levy’ at the British Museum

By Helia Ebrahimi, Senior City Correspondent

2:47PM GMT 27 Mar 2013

No man is an island. But try telling General Gregor MacGregor that.

He invented one, the Principality of Poyais, which he claimed to rule before selling shares in the South American colony. It turned out to be totally uninhabitable.

He also pre-fixed his name with “Sir”. As you do. His honour, as it turned out, was also fictitious.

Still, in many ways, the general was a prototype investment banker. Not that far removed, perhaps, from those who packaged up sub-prime mortgages known to be worthless before selling them to hapless investors.

In fact, UK history – as the British Museum reveals in its “Bubbles and Bankruptcy” exhibition – is crammed with examples of wily banking scams, bailouts and asset bubbles.

From the South Sea bubble, to tulip speculation, it turns out that naughty bankers have always had a knack of getting rich while others pick up the bill. Not least the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street – aka the Bank of England.

The exhibition takes an amusing look at Northern Rock’s collapse, which is placed alongside a collage of defunct credit cards from HBOS, RBS and Lloyds – now propped up only by taxpayer funds.

financial-crises-1_2521051c Read more of this post

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