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The most famous brand states have produced

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Mission vs Ambition: Our vision in life defines the quality and direction of your thoughts; Mother Teresa at a tender age of 12 years, took a vow to commit herself to a religious life

Mission vs Ambition

by Ashu Khanna | May 29, 2013

Our vision in life defines the quality and direction of your thoughts

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“The very essence of leadership is that you have vision. You can’t blow an uncertain trumpet.” Hesburg

Our vision in life defines the quality and direction of your thoughts. If our vision in life is to be successful, every action will be directed from the need to be successful. Similarly, if our vision in life is being happy and peaceful, the quality of our thoughts will be governed by this need. Based on our circumstances and desires, we all have a different vision for our life. The vision for life often changes with stages of life. In the early years, we are driven by fun and learning and gradually, this changes to ambition and success.

Mother Teresa at a tender age of 12 years, took a vow to commit herself to a religious life. Having established a higher ideal for her life at such an early age, all her actions from thereon gravitated towards learning the order of the nuns and the language of the mission.  Read more of this post

Creative companies: What are the 10 secrets of innovative offices? Allow Time for Ideas to Emerge; Improvise at the Edge of Chaos; Manage Knowledge for Innovation; Ditch the Organizational Chart; Build Decentralized Networks

Creative companies: What are the 10 secrets of innovative offices?

by Eric Barker

What do creative companies do right?

Keith Sawyer got his PhD studying under Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi — the researcher who coined the idea of Flow. I’ve posted about his research on top creative teams and how brainstorming is broken. What did he find when he studied creative companies?

1) Keep Many Irons in the Fire

“In 1997, Shona Brown of McKinsey and Company, working with Kathleen Eisenhardt of Stanford University’s business school, compared three collaborative organizations with three organizations that didn’t innovate. The collaborative organizations constantly experimented, and they always had several different low-cost projects in the works. But instead of a grand plan that organized all the projects, they responded to what emerged. The contrast with the noninnovative companies couldn’t have been more stark— those companies didn’t have any experimental projects under way. And their managers dealt with the future by planning the future— spending months on elaborate strategy and product development plans. The problem was that if the future didn’t unfold according to plan, they were doomed to fail.” Read more of this post

How to build an “agile” culture

How to build an “agile” culture

BY BOB GOWER 
ON MAY 28, 2013

In 1987, when Paul O’Neill took over as CEO of Alcoa — a once great giant of American industry — he vowed to put all his energy behind improving one metric and one metric only: worker safety. When his tactics were questioned by a group of concerned investors, he explained, “If we bring our injury rates down, it won’t be because of cheerleading or the nonsense you sometimes hear from other CEOs. It will be because the individuals at this company have agreed to become part of something important: They’ve devoted themselves to creating a habit of excellence.”

O’Neill chose safety as his metric — instead of profits, efficiency, inventory or cost of goods sold — because he recognized that safety is core to culture and that culture in turn is core to success. Transform the culture, he believed, and you’d transform the bottom line. Read more of this post

Enduring lessons from the legend of Rothschild’s carrier pigeon

May 28, 2013 5:58 pm

Enduring lessons from the legend of Rothschild’s carrier pigeon

By John Kay

In an era of high-frequency trading, it is differences in perception that offer opportunities

In 1815, the combined forces of Britain and Prussia defeated Napoleon’s army at the Battle of Waterloo. It was, said the Duke of Wellington, a damn close run thing. But even before the dust had settled on the battlefield, a carrier pigeon belonging to the House of Rothschild was on its way across the Channel to London. Nathan Rothschild, informed ahead of other traders that the country was not to be over-run by the French, consequently made a killing by buying British government bonds.

Little of this legend is true but there are elements that are accurate. There was a battle at Waterloo, which ended Napoleon’s career. Wellington did not say it was a damn close run thing but there is evidence he thought so. The Rothschilds used carrier pigeons but that was not how they learnt the battle’s outcome. Rothschild did have early knowledge of the outcome, and may have used it to advantage, but that knowledge was not the source of the house of Rothschild’s fabled wealth. It did, however, earn a great deal, helping governments of all complexions to fund the Napoleonic wars. Read more of this post

Self-made millionaire and Pimlico Plumbers founder Charlie Mullins shares how he made his first million and how he’s grown his business significantly despite the economic gloom

Charlie Mullins: How I made my first million

Self-made millionaire and Pimlico Plumbers founder Charlie Mullins shares how he made his first million.

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By Emma Wall

3:45PM BST 28 May 2013

Charlie Mullins was Britain’s first “millionaire plumber”. Pimlico Plumbers was started from a basement of a London estate agent in 1979; it now employs 200 people and has an £18m turnover.

Charlie decided at the age of nine that he wanted to be a plumber, after noticing that his local plumber was well respected, had a great lifestyle and money. So, he took to ‘bunking off’ school to earn “two bob a day”’ working with the local plumber.

After leaving school at 15 with no qualifications – “a big mistake, I should have left at 14,” he said – and completing a four year apprenticeship in plumbing Charlie started out with a second hand van and a bag of tools. In 1979 he started Pimlico Plumbers from a basement of an estate agent in Pimlico. Read more of this post

Export Champions: My Carry Potty is an overseas hit; Amanda Jenner, founder of My Carry Potty, explains how she turned her “back of a cigarette packet” sketch into a business that’s exporting to 30 markets

Export Champions: My Carry Potty is an overseas hit

Amanda Jenner, founder of My Carry Potty, explains how she turned her “back of a cigarette packet” sketch into a business that’s exporting to 30 markets.

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Amanda Jenner started My Carry Potty four years ago

By James Hurley

6:05PM BST 28 May 2013

A fledgling exporting strategy can go too well. Just ask Amanda Jenner. Three years ago, when she took the children’s travel potty she had designed to an overseas trade show for the first time, she was overwhelmed by interest and orders.

“We had an astronomical response – I was shocked at the strength of it. It was just me and one product next to all these established businesses but we got orders from South Korea, America, Germany and Italy.”

“Hugely exciting”, the Bournemouth-based entrepreneur recalls, yet she admits she was “naive” to take on “everyone who said yes”. “People will order 1,000 units but don’t want to build the brand. Now we’ve realised exporting is not all about volume.” Read more of this post

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