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Asia’s Hot-Money Meltdown; Receding capital flows suggest deeper structural flaws in emerging economies.

August 28, 2013, 12:23 p.m. ET

Asia’s Hot-Money Meltdown

Receding capital flows suggest deeper structural flaws in emerging economies.

LIM SAY BOON

Investors are starting to whisper what was unthinkable just a few months ago, that emerging Asia faces another financial crisis. While this remains unlikely, stocks in China, Indonesia, Philippines, and Thailand are already in a bear market that will likely broaden and intensify. The problems are both cyclical and structural, and policy options are limited. The recent stock-market falls and currency routs suggest the coming months will be rough. Singapore’s Straits Times index, Taiwan’s Taiex, Korea’s KOSPI, India’s Sensex and Malaysia’s KLCI have either broken or are breaking below important technical supports, with the likelihood of accelerated losses ahead. There may be corrective rebounds in emerging-market currencies and equities over the coming week or two, but these are likely to be pauses rather than reversals. There are no quick fixes to the savings deficits in the economies worst hit by falling currencies, equities and bond prices. Read more of this post

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How JoJo Maman Bebe founder Laura Tenison shunned university to start a business

How JoJo Maman Bebe founder Laura Tenison shunned university to start a business

Laura Tenison’s upbringing was “pretty sexist”, she jokes, with her mother teaching her only the girlie jobs of sewing and cooking. She is now arguably one of Britain’s most successful entrepreneurs. Emma Sinclair asks her how she did it.

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Laura Tenison is the founder of JoJo Maman Bebe, the maternity, baby and nursery company she started in 1993.

By Emma Sinclair

3:39PM BST 27 Aug 2013

Laura Tenison is the founder of JoJo Maman Bebe, the baby clothing retailer she started in 1993. The company has 46 stores across the UK, expanding at a rate of eight new stores a year in the UK and selling to 37 countries – and growing. In 2010, when Ms Tenison won Veuve Clicquot’s Business Woman of the Year trophy, the company had a turnover of £20m and 27 UK stores. The retailer has forecast revenue of £44m for 2014. All this on start-up capital of £50,000, conceived in a hospital bed. Read more of this post

The strategy consultants in search of a strategy; Consultancy is in a funk as midsized partnerships realise they have to do something to survive

August 28, 2013 7:10 pm

The strategy consultants in search of a strategy

By John Gapper

Consultancy is in a funk as midsized partnerships realise they have to do something to survive

Did you hear the one about the strategy consultancy that could not work out a strategy for itself? It might make chief executives being billed $500 an hour for the wisdom of McKinsey & Co or Boston Consulting Group chuckle, but it is not a joke for the industry. Consultancy is in a funk as midsized partnerships with venerable names, such as Booz & Co and Roland Berger, realise they have to do something but cannot decide on what. Just carrying on is not an option – they face the spectre of Monitor, the consultancy that went bankrupt last year, and was bought by Deloitte for only $120m. Read more of this post

Scientists create human ‘mini-brain’; Breakthrough could help treat autism and schizophrenia

August 28, 2013 6:00 pm

Scientists create human ‘mini-brain’

By Clive Cookson, Science Editor

Biomedical scientists have turned human stem-cells into pea-sized mini-brains with a neural structure similar to the brain of a developing embryo. These “cerebral organoids”, as they are termed formally, are the best living model of a human brain created so far. The scientists at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IMBA) in Vienna have already used their mini-brains to investigate one neuronal disorder, microcephaly, in which the brain does not grow properly. They hope to apply the technique to more complex conditions such as autism and schizophrenia, for which no good animal models are available. Read more of this post

Researchers take on crucial question: Are haters gonna hate? The ‘Hater Test’ Shows Why Some People Hate Everything

Researchers take on crucial question: Are haters gonna hate?

By Sarah Kliff, Updated: August 27, 2013

It is an age-old adage of Twitter, which apparently traces its roots back to a 3LW video from 2000: Haters gonna hate.

Now, scientists have taken it upon themselves to figure out whether this is true. Do verified haters tend to hate everything else they stumble upon? Yes, according to a new study in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. People who tend to hate things they already know about are (surprise!) more disposed to hate things they have not yet come in contact with. To test out this theory, a team of psychologists asked study participants how they felt about a number of mundane and unrelated subjects that included (but was not limited to) architecture, health care, crossword puzzles, taxidermy and Japan. Read more of this post

A Light Footprint Can Lead to Powerful Business Gains in a “Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous” (VUCA) world

A Light Footprint Can Lead to Powerful Business Gains

by Charles-Edouard Bouée  |  12:00 PM August 28, 2013

Some of the best current lessons on how to adapt to our changing business environment come from the realm of military doctrine. And one key methodology stems from mid-1990s, when students at the U.S. Army War College were told repeatedly they were preparing for leadership roles in a “Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous” (VUCA) world. Barack Obama’s “Light Footprint” doctrine of warfare, featuring novel uses of drones, cyberweapons, special forces, allies, and proxies, is an early adaptation to the VUCA world. Read more of this post

This chart shows the future of venture capital

This chart shows the future of venture capital

BY ERIN GRIFFITH 
ON AUGUST 28, 2013

future-of-vc

The dramatic drop in the cost of creating a company over the last decade ($2 million in the late ’90s to maybe $5,000 today) has had an obvious effect on the venture capital world. Serious venture investment is not required in the earliest stages of a company’s life, so angel investors have been getting the best seed deals. That spawned “super angels” and their subsequent micro-VC funds, which in turn evolved into crowdfunding platforms like AngelList. Read more of this post

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