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The Gift of Adversity: The Unexpected Benefits of Life’s Difficulties, Setbacks, and Imperfections

The Gift of Adversity: The Unexpected Benefits of Life’s Difficulties, Setbacks, and Imperfections Hardcover

by Norman E Rosenthal M.D. (Author)

Adversity

Adversity is an irreducible fact of life.  Although we can and should learn from all experiences, both positive and negative, bestselling author Dr. Norman E. Rosenthal, believes that adversity is by far the best teacher most of us will ever encounter. Whether the adversity one experiences is the result of poor decision-making, a desire to test one’s mettle, or plain bad luck, Rosenthal believes life’s most important lessons—from the value of family to the importance of occasionally cutting corners—can be best learned from it. Running counter to society’s current prevailing message that “excellence” must always be aspired to, and failure or mistakes of any sort are to be avoided at all costs, Rosenthal shows that engaging with our own failures and defeats is one of the only ways we are able to live authentic and meaningful lives, and that each different type of adversity carries its own challenges and has the potential to yield its own form of wisdom. Using stories from his own life—including his childhood in apartheid-era South Africa, his years after suffering a violent attack from a stranger, and his career as a psychiatrist—as well as case studies and discussions with well-known figures like Viktor Frankl and David Lynch, Rosenthal shows that true innovation, emotional resilience, wisdom, and dignity can only come from confronting and understanding the adversity we have experienced. Even when life is hardest, there are meanings to be found, riches to be harvested, and gifts that can last a lifetime.  Rosenthal illustrates his message through a series of compact, memorable chapters, each one drawn from episodes in the lives of his patients, colleagues, or himself, and concluded with a take-away maxim on the lesson learned. Read more of this post

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When A Startup Worth Hundreds Of Millions Goes Dark: Klout’s Quiet Year Of Growth And Struggle

When A Startup Worth Hundreds Of Millions Goes Dark: Klout’s Quiet Year Of Growth And Struggle

ALYSON SHONTELL SEP. 14, 2013, 8:09 AM 19,455 22

“What do you want to be when you grow up?”

It’s a question all startups have to answer between giant fundraises and figuring out business models. Some growing companies, like Twitter and Facebook, handle adolescence well.  For others it’s awkward and takes serious soul searching to find a place in the business world. Klout is one of those companies. In early 2012, the social-importance ranking engine was on fire. Kleiner Perkins, Microsoft, and other big-name backers pumped $30 million into Joe Fernandez’s company at a valuation worth hundreds of millions of dollars. Then Klout vanished from headlines. Last week it reappeared. The news wasn’t good. Klout’s COO, Emil Michael, resigned. He left for Uber, the latest red-hot startup worth billions of dollars, to be its SVP of Business. Michael remains on Klout’s Board of Directors. Losing Michael as COO was one of a few snags the company has faced since its 2012 fundraise. The rumor mill has started to churn. Read more of this post

No Child Left Untableted; Rupert Murdoch’s new idea for how to educate America

September 12, 2013

No Child Left Untableted

By CARLO ROTELLA

Sally Hurd Smith, a veteran teacher, held up her brand-new tablet computer and shook it as she said, “I don’t want this thing to take over my classroom.” It was late June, a month before the first day of school. In a sixth-grade classroom in Greensboro, N.C., a dozen middle-school social-studies teachers were getting their second of three days of training on tablets that had been presented to them as a transformative educational tool. Every student and teacher in 18 of Guilford County’s 24 middle schools would receive one, 15,450 in all, to be used for class work, homework, educational games — just about everything, eventually. Read more of this post

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