The Most Important Negotiation in Your Life

The Most Important Negotiation in Your Life

by Erica Ariel Fox  |  11:00 AM September 3, 2013

Life is a series of negotiations.

You negotiate all day, every day, from the time you wake up to the time you go to sleep. Contract terms and conditions. Hiring, managing performance, and firing. Defining deadlines, scope, and deliverables. Collecting fees. Seeking alignment about business strategy. Enlisting stakeholders. Creating partnerships and joint ventures. Dissolving them. You make offers, counteroffers, and agreements to settle. You say yes. You say no. You stall for time. Finally, lunch. When you go home, the negotiations continue. Over buying a new car, switching carpool days, or how much screen time the kids are allowed. The stakes of negotiating at home can feel sky-high: which medical advice to follow; how much to spend or save; how long your aging parents can live at home; whether to stay together. From the major to the mundane, negotiating is the way we get things done. One of my clients told me, “my toughest negotiations are with my dog.” If you’re like most people, when you think about negotiation, you picture people talking to “the other side.” Whether they’re pitching to a customer in an office, brokering a peace deal at Camp David, or arguing over curfew at the kitchen table, negotiators are people trying to persuade other people of their point of view.

That’s only half the story.

After nearly 20 years of teaching negotiation at Harvard Law School, and the same years spent advising and training thousands of executives, public sector leaders, consultants and lawyers from all over the world, I see things differently. Actually, the most important negotiations we have — the ones that determine the quality of our lives and the impact of our actions — are the ones we have with ourselves. Learning to communicate well and to influence other people are essential skills in business. But even more fundamental to your success is learning to negotiate effectively with yourself.

Negotiating with yourself?

Yes. Better results, stronger relationships, and more of life’s deeper rewards, all come from learning to negotiate with yourself. Read more of this post

Ronald H. Coase challenged conventional economic wisdom

Ronald H. Coase challenged conventional economic wisdom

Pierre Lemieux, Special to Financial Post | 13/09/03 | Last Updated:13/09/03 4:16 PM ET

obit_ronald_coase

AP Photo/Courtesy of the University of Chicago Law SchoolThis undated photo provided by the University of Chicago Law School shows professor Ronald Coase. Coase, a Nobel Prize winner and pioneer in

Coase taught us why companies make sense, and why the polluter-pay principle doesn’t

It has been said of Ronald Coase, who died on Monday aged 102, that he wrote two articles in his career, and that each of them changed economics. In truth, Coase wrote several dozen articles and a few books, but a couple of his articles especially stand out as unique contributions.

The first seminal article was “The Nature of the Firm,” published in 1937. Why, asked Coase, does the firm exist? Why is not all production organized by arms-length contractors under the coordination of the market? Why does the authoritarian firm exist within the anarchistic context of the free market? Coase’s answer was that “there is a cost of using the price mechanism.” This cost relates to what were later labelled “transaction costs” — the costs of “discovering what the relevant prices are,” and of “negotiating and concluding a separate contract for each exchange transaction.” A firm is created when these transaction costs are higher than the costs of organizing and managing the firm. Read more of this post

Trevor Baylis, the inventor of the wind-up radio is calling on young people to consider the so-called “oily rag” trade

British inventor: Trevor Baylis calls for schools to teach importance of invention

The inventor of the wind-up radio is calling on young people to consider the so-called “oily rag” trade. “Britain needs more engineers,” says Trevor Baylis.

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Trevor Baylis in his garden, which overlooks the Thames Photo: PAUL GROVER

By Rebecca Burn-Callander

6:00AM BST 03 Sep 2013

“You don’t have to be a genius to be an inventor,” according to the serial entrepreneur and founder of Trevor Baylis Brands, which has helped over 9,000 inventors bring products to market. “I don’t wake up every morning thinking, ‘I’m going to invent something today’.” Mr Baylis OBE, 76, developed the world’s first wind-up radio in the early nineties. More recently, he has invented a mobile phone that is charged by a special pair of shoes as you walk. “Unfortunately, people are a bit nervous of the shoes because they look a bit like a bomb,” he admits. Read more of this post

Anxious and approaching 40: the high-flyers of the GFC left behind

Anxious and approaching 40: the high-flyers of the GFC left behind

PUBLISHED: 17 HOURS 13 MINUTES AGO | UPDATE: 4 HOURS 38 MINUTES AGO

Many middle-aged men feel their career is not moving and this depresses them. 

JILL MARGO

In the long, slow aftermath of the GFC, many careers have stalled. But it now appears that one group of bright young men have been hit particularly hard. These are the promising youngsters who were powering through the ranks of the financial services industry before the crisis hit. With the wind behind them and bonuses in front of them, their expectations were high. Now, they are still employed but almost five years have passed with hardly any upward movement. Read more of this post

Kyobo Life Insurance will hold an event to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the insurance firm’s founder Shin Yong-ho’s death; known by his penname Daesan, Shin was a pioneer in the local insurance industry by creating the world’s first ‘education insurance policy”

2013-09-03 17:50

Kyobo to commemorate founder

By Kim Tae-jong

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The late Kyobo Life Insurance founder Shin Yong-ho, left, receives the Founders’ Award from the International Insurance Society in this file photo taken on June 27 in 1983

Kyobo Life Insurance will hold an event tonight to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the insurance firm’s founder Shin Yong-ho’s death at the Sejong Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Seoul, the company said Tuesday.
Also known by his penname Daesan, he was a legendary figure in the local insurance industry and devoted himself to the promotion of education here after the Korean War.
The event, which takes place between 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., consists of a photo exhibition, a commemoration ceremony and several performances. Distinguished guests will be in attendance, including International Insurance Society (IIS) CEO Michael Morrissey, Korean Poets Association Chairwoman Shin Dal-ja and ex-president of Sejong University, Yang Seung-kyu as well as other officials from the insurance industry. Read more of this post

Wang Wei, the soft-spoken billionaire head of SF Express, is finally opening his company to outside investments, a full 20 years after first founding his delivery service business

09.03.2013 19:04

Courier Service Firm Finally Takes Delivery of Outside Investment

For years SF Express resisted taking other people’s money, but a desire to remain an industry leader has seen it accept boxes of cash lately

By staff reporters Zhu Yishi and Zheng Fei

(Beijing) — Wang Wei, the soft-spoken head of SF Express, is finally opening his company to outside investments, a full 20 years after first founding his delivery service business. On August 19, executives at SF Express (Group) Co. Ltd. confirmed the company had entered a strategic investment agreement with state-backed investors Oriza Holdings of Suzhou, Jiangsu Province; China Merchants Group; and CITIC Capital. The three investors will own a little less than 25 percent of SF Express after the deal. Read more of this post

Doctors worry as heart drug research loses steam

Doctors worry as heart drug research loses steam

4:42am EDT

By Ben Hirschler

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – The hunt for new heart drugs is losing momentum as resources are switched to other areas, notably cancer research, where investors get a better bang for their buck. Cardiologists fear the fight against heart disease could stall as a result, following major advances in recent decades marked by the advent of drugs to fight cholesterol, lower blood pressure and prevent dangerous blood clots. Read more of this post

One in four U.S. heart disease deaths could be prevented, CDC says

One in four U.S. heart disease deaths could be prevented, CDC says

7:16pm EDT

By Julie Steenhuysen

CHICAGO (Reuters) – About one in four U.S. deaths from heart disease could be avoided with better prevention efforts and treatment, according to a first-of-its-kind report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released on Tuesday. As many as 200,000 Americans might have been spared an early death in 2010 from a heart attack or stroke if they had received screening and treatment for preventable causes of heart disease such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity and smoking, the report found. Read more of this post

Scientists find possible new way of fighting high blood pressure

Scientists find possible new way of fighting high blood pressure

11:01am EDT

By Kate Kelland

LONDON (Reuters) – Scientists experimenting with rats have found that de-activating certain nerves in the neck can effectively treat high blood pressure – a discovery that could be an advance in tackling one of the world’s biggest silent killers. Researchers at Britain’s Bristol University found that in rats with high blood pressure, when they removed nerve links between the brain and the carotid body – a nodule about the size of a grain of rice on the side of each carotid artery – the animals’ blood pressure fell and remained low. Read more of this post

More than one million families have been forced to sell their home in just five years to meet the cost of elderly care

Elderly care crisis claims a million family homes

More than one million families have been forced to sell their home in just five years to meet the cost of paying for residential care, new figures have revealed.

Number of homes sold to pay for care ‘could be higher than previously thought’ Photo: IAN JONES

By John Bingham, Social Affairs Editor

10:00PM BST 03 Sep 2013

The estimate, based on polling measuring families’ individual experiences, is far higher than Government projections have previously suggested. But charities and pensions experts said it represented one of the first realistic attempts to quantify the scale of the hidden care funding crisis in the UK. And they claimed that it showed that the Government’s long-awaited overhaul of the social care system in England – including the introduction of a cap on bills – does not go far or fast enough to address the crisis thousands of families are facing. Read more of this post

Singapore: Just sell. That was what an owner of an HDB executive mansionette in the north-east told his property agent last Thursday with new three-year wait for PRs to buy property

Sell at all cost

Wednesday, Sep 04, 2013

Ronald loh

The New Paper

SINGAPORE – Just sell. That was what an owner of an HDB executive mansionette in the north-east told his property agent last Thursday. In a bid to stabilise the property market here, the Government announced several major changes last Tuesday. The new measures were so significant that sellers are reducing their asking cash over valuation (COV) – the cash premium buyers pay for resale Housing Board flats. One of the measures was a three-year wait for newly-converted permanent residents (PRs) before they are allowed to buy resale HDB flats. Some sellers are panicking, five property agents told The New Paper on Sunday. Agents specialising in HDB flats said they have seen COVs plummet by up to $60,000 over the past few months and they expect the numbers to dip some more. Read more of this post

Singapore: Why pay $12 million for quiet coffee shop? “The coffee shop is like an art piece – its worth will appreciate over time.”

Why pay $12 million for quiet coffee shop?

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 – 09:40

Linette Heng

The Straits Times

You will still see the same old faces here every day, jokes the regulars at a quiet coffee shop in Tampines. The place was put up for sale late last month, with an asking price of $10 to 12 million. This tender exercise comes just months after a coffee shop in Hougang was reportedly sold for a record price of $23.8 million. But patrons and stall owners are puzzled by the asking price of this particular Tampines coffee shop, DE 131. Read more of this post

Most Influential 50’s New Names Show Shakeup: Bloomberg Markets

Most Influential 50’s New Names Show Shakeup: Bloomberg Markets

They shape economies, move markets, do deals — and change the world. They hold sway by virtue of the money the manage, the companies they control, the policies they enact and the ideas they propound. The people on the third annual 50 Most Influential list, to be published in the October issue of Bloomberg Markets magazine, command attention as masters of the global financial system. Some work the strings of power in the courtroom or the halls of government, while others campaign for access to education, equal opportunities or the alleviation of poverty. These are people with clout. To find candidates for our list, we tap the expertise of reporters and editors in 146 Bloomberg News bureaus around the globe. Rankings published in Bloomberg Markets throughout the year help shape our decisions. Recent achievements count for more than long careers, although Warren Buffett, 83, and Carl Icahn, 77, show that it’s possible to have both. In all, 36 of our 50 are new to the list this year. Only seven — including Buffett, Lloyd Blankfein, Jamie Dimon and Larry Fink — have been on it all three years. We’ve grouped our influencers into five categories: Bankers, Policy Makers, Money Managers, Corporate Power Brokers and Thinkers. As in prior years, we excluded heads of government from the Policy Makers rubric, favoring instead the cabinet officials, regulators and central bankers who actually make things happen. Read more of this post

Hello Kitty jet flies into Los Angeles

Hello Kitty jet flies into Los Angeles

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EVA air plane decorated with “Hello Kitty”

11 hours ago

The most famous cat in the world will be making its maiden voyage into the US this month, when Taiwanese airline Eva Air sends its first Hello Kitty-emblazoned jet into Los Angeles. After accompanying passengers on Asian routes to Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, China and Guam for years, the cartoon kitten that has become fetishized for generations the world over will make her first North American journey later this month on a B777-300, reports Business Traveller Asia-Pacific. The service is also likewise to enter Europe in the future. Read more of this post

Get outrageous to get ahead

Get outrageous to get ahead

Calls to raise productivity have never been more pressing, at a time when the outlook for world economic growth is uncertain. Even then, the reality of getting past the productivity plateau is a long-term challenge that many countries are all too familiar with.

BY GERRY TAN –

6 HOURS 52 MIN AGO

Calls to raise productivity have never been more pressing, at a time when the outlook for world economic growth is uncertain. Even then, the reality of getting past the productivity plateau is a long-term challenge that many countries are all too familiar with. At a time when businesses are facing increasing pressures to perform, what does it take for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to stay ahead of the game? Read more of this post

Venture capital’s model battle

Venture capital’s model battle

By Dan Primack September 3, 2013: 4:02 PM ET

Defending the defense of venture capital “classic.”

FORTUNE — Here are three things I believe about the venture capital industry:

1. Until five or six years ago, the venture capital model was largely unchanged from what it had been in the 1980s and 1990s. Different people and bigger dollars, but the same general structure and strategy.

2. Today there are a variety of new models. Some focus on providing a variety of non-finance services to entrepreneurs (marketing, HR, etc.). Some borrow from the crowdfunding model. Some emphasize their ability to make decisions in less time than it takes a “traditional” VC to iron his blue shirt.

3. We have no idea which model is actually better, from the perspective of generating high returns (which is the actual job of venture capitalists). Read more of this post

When Movies Trade on Real Life; Do the makers of films claiming to be based on or inspired by real stories have an allegiance to the truth, or just to the art of storytelling?

UPDATED SEPTEMBER 3, 2013 9:59 PM

When Movies Trade on Real Life

DEBATERS

Being True Is Hard Work PAMELA KATZ, SCREENWRITER

One must be accurate about someone’s life. But if you don’t illuminate something essential about their life, work and personality, you fail to tell the truth.

From Little Truth, a Bigger Truth AISHA HARRIS, SLATE

Inventing most of its characters and plot lines, “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” turns a benign life into a symbol of an epic struggle.

Manipulate History? So Did Shakespeare ROBERT B. TOPLIN, HISTORIAN

Cinematic historians exercise a good deal of artistic license because they make stories entertaining and understandable.

Filmmakers Have a Duty to Be Honest PAUL BYRNES, CRITIC

It’s foolish to assume no one will check a fact on the Internet. We all deserve a higher standard of truth.

A Blurred Line Between Fact and Fiction MOLLY HASKELL, CRITIC

Filmmakers need to have more faith in viewers, and viewers need to be more skeptical about filmmakers.

INTRODUCTION

This seems to be the year of the fact-based movie. After “Argo,” “Lincoln” and “Zero Dark Thirty“ dominated the Oscar buzz last year, more movies are based on or inspired by true stories. “Fruitvale Station” tells of the 2009 shooting of a young man by an Oakland transit officer and “Captain Phillips” will recount a merchant ship’s capture by Somali pirates. Other films out or coming out this year are based on the lives of Steve JobsJulian Assangeand Linda Lovelace. Often, in these films, accuracy is sacrificed for drama. But do the makers of films claiming to be based on or inspired by real stories have an allegiance to the truth, or just to the art of storytelling?

Read more of this post

Global warming fueling tornadoes: Japan

Global warming fueling tornadoes: Japan

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 – 10:28

Yusuke Tomiyama and Hiroyuki Oyama

The Japan News/Asia News Network

JAPAN – Tornadoes are relatively uncommon in Japan, but they have hit the nation with increasing frequency amid global warming. A tornado ripped through Saitama and Chiba prefectures on Monday, blowing roofs off of buildings and injuring dozens of people. The tornado was spawned by huge cumulonimbus clouds that rapidly developed in the Kanto region on Monday afternoon. Read more of this post

Bloomberg’s very strange headlines are in danger of making sense

Bloomberg’s very strange headlines are in danger of making sense

By Zachary M. Seward @zseward September 3, 2013

The famously bizarre and inscrutable headlines that often adorn Bloomberg News articles are a cherished joke among journalists, most of all within Bloomberg itself. But they may be in danger of losing their peculiar edge.

Some prototypically odd headlines from the past year:

 Feeding Naked Chef’s Chickens Killing Biggest Bond Rally
 Mao’s Red Flag May Need to Evoke Panda DNA to Beat Audi
 Harvard Women Freed From Urinal 50 Years After First Female MBA
 BMW to Amazon Space Demand Spurs Rush to Inland Empire

That Bloomberg writes sometimes incomprehensible titles for its article is no secret. The phenomenon has a hashtag and a parody Twitter account. But now, to the chagrin of some Bloomberg News staff, someone important has taken notice. Read more of this post

Revealed: UK Government let British company export nerve gas chemicals to Syria

Revealed: UK Government let British company export nerve gas chemicals to Syria

UK accused of ‘breath-taking laxity’ over export licence for potassium fluoride and sodium fluoride

CAHAL MILMO  , ANDY MCSMITH NIKHIL KUMAR

MONDAY 02 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Government was accused of “breathtaking laxity” in its arms controls last night after it emerged that officials authorised the export to Syria of two chemicals capable of being used to make a nerve agent such as sarin a year ago. The Business Secretary, Vince Cable, will today be asked by MPs to explain why a British company was granted export licences for the dual-use substances for six months in 2012 while Syria’s civil war was raging and concern was rife that the regime could use chemical weapons on its own people. The disclosure of the licences for potassium fluoride and sodium fluoride, which can both be used as precursor chemicals in the manufacture of nerve gas, came as the US Secretary of State John Kerry said the United States had evidence that sarin  gas was used in last month’s atrocity in Damascus. Read more of this post

Chinese netizens jokes about Microsoft’s acquisition of Nokia

China’s web reacts to Microsoft’s acquisition of Nokia

September 4, 2013

by C. Custer

I think Nokia holds a special place in the hearts of a lot of Chinese mobile phone users. When I first moved to the country in 2007, my Chinese friends all told me: get a Nokia. They’re cheap, they’re durable, and they work; this was the mantra that helped the mobile phone company dominate China’s nascent mobile marketplace. Just a few years later, though, things have changed dramatically, as evidenced by Microsoft’s acquisition of Nokia yesterday. Nokia’s dominance is long-gone in China, but could the acquisition put the once-popular company back on the upswing there? Sina Tech conducted a poll of 70,000 its readers — so mostly tech geeks, presumably — and found that more than 54 percent look favorably on the buyout, with just over 30 percent pessimistic about the company’s prospects under Microsoft’s wing and the remaining 14 percent not sure. The mood on Sina Weibo seems to be similar, with lots of people hoping the acquisition can re-invigorate the struggling company. Hope might be the key word there; China’s net users are definitely also engaging in a little bit of nostalgia for the (good?) old days when everybody had a Nokia brick. For example, this lengthy infographic charting Nokia’s handsets over the years is making the rounds. Of course, it wouldn’t be the Chinese web without jokes, so here’s a bit of one of the most popular images that’s being passed around. Translation by us:

elop-ballmer-microsoft-nokia-chinese-jokes

Microsoft’s Nokia Purchase Torches $16.6 Billion In Market Cap, Almost As Much As Ballmer’s Exit Added; Why Microsoft Had No Choice But To Purchase Nokia’s Handset Business; why Microsoft raced to Nokia deal

Microsoft’s Nokia Purchase Torches $16.6 Billion In Market Cap, Almost As Much As Ballmer’s Exit Added

ALEX WILHELM

posted yesterday

On the news that Microsoft will purchase substantial assets from Nokia, including its handset business and intellectual property, company investors have discarded its stock, sending it down 6 percent in regular trading. At current trade, that decline represents $16.6 billion in market capitalization, a stunning repudiation of the plan by investors. To put the decline in perspective, when current CEO Steve Ballmer announced that he will relinquish his role at Microsoft, the company picked up $18 billion in value. Read more of this post

Is the Kindle really the only e-reader that matters?

Is the Kindle really the only e-reader that matters?

BY NATHANIEL MOTT 
ON SEPTEMBER 3, 2013

Reports of the Kindle’s death have been greatly exaggerated. Reports of other e-reader’s continuedslide into obsolescence, however, appear to be spot-on.

The New York Times reported on Sunday that the Kindle’s share of the Japanese market dwarfs that of homegrown products made by Sony and Rakuten — not because the Kindle’s competitors are technologically inferior, but because the Amazon Web Store is easier to use than Rakuten or Sony’s online marketplaces. Read more of this post

Kodak Exits Bankruptcy as Printer Without Photographs with ‘tech’ focus

Kodak emerges from bankruptcy with ‘tech’ focus

September 4, 2013 – 12:21PM

Bree Fowler

A slimmed-down Kodak has emerged from bankruptcy protection and says it will specialise in technology focused on imaging for businesses.

You can feel the spirit of George Eastman in Antonio Perez’s office. A picture of Eastman, who founded Kodak in 1880, sits among the current chief executive’s collection of family photos. The outer areas of Perez’s office, built and first inhabited by Eastman about a century ago, include some of Kodak’s Oscar and Emmy awards, along with a collection of historic photos. A large portrait of Eastman, who died in 1932, hangs near the entrance. Perez’s surroundings serve as a constant reminder of Kodak’s hallowed history in the print and movie film industries – and of the pressure he is under to revive the ailing company. Read more of this post

Microsoft Brings New ESPN And NFL Experiences To Xbox One

Microsoft Brings New ESPN And NFL Experiences To Xbox One

RYAN LAWLER

posted 18 hours ago

When Microsoft’s next-generation video game console launches in the fall, it wants to provide users with plenty of reasons to buy one. And what better reason is there than sports? With that in mind, the new Xbox One will feature improved apps for sports fans tuning in to ESPN and the NFL. The new ESPN app is designed to provide a personalized experience for users, highlighting all content that is relevant to them. There’s a fair amount of customization available for users — for instance, they can designate specific sports leagues or teams to follow and having clips, highlights, and news shown when they log in.

Read more of this post

Sony Eyes Sensors in Wearable Computers to Gesture TVs

Sony Eyes Sensors in Wearable Computers to Gesture TVs

Sony Corp. (6758) is considering applying its image sensors to wearable computers and hand-gesture TVs for growth as it expects smartphone revenue to peak around 2015.

The company plans to seek growth in developing the chips, already used in smartphones and digital cameras, for products such as self-driving cars and medical equipment, Yasuhiro Ueda, senior vice president for Sony’s image sensor unit, said in an interview. Read more of this post

Tesla Is the New Apple: Najarian; Any mention of the electric car industry leader’s stock in a favorable light is met by the sneering contempt unique to bears

Tesla Is the New Apple: Najarian

By Jeff Macke | Breakout – 17 hours ago

Tesla’s (TSLA) stock has done nothing but make people money but you wouldn’t know it from the Twitter-sphere. Any mention of the electric car industry leader’s stock in a favorable light is met by the sneering contempt unique to bears. Sure there are devotees but for the most part Tesla is regarded as a stock for cult-members, not investors. “If you talk positively about Tesla you’re some sort of fiend,” says OptionMonster’s Jon Najarian. “There are so many haters… you can see it by the 30% short interest.” In that sense Najarian says he hasn’t seen such instinctive contempt for “cult-ish” shareholders since the days when Steve Jobs was running Apple (AAPL). Read more of this post

The next version of Google’s Android operating system will be named KitKat

Sep 3, 2013

KitKat, Google’s Purely Promotional OS Flavor

By Greg Bensinger

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GoogleGOOG +1.59% raised eyebrows Tuesday when it announced that the next version of its Android operating system will be named KitKat, after the trademarked NestleNESN.VX -0.73% candy bar. Sundar Pichai, Google’s head of Android, said in a blog post on Google+ that he was surprised to return from a trip to Asia only to find a giant statue of an Android-looking KitKat bar on the lawn. That Google named the latest version of its mobile OS after a sweet treat isn’t a surprise. Previous versions of Android software have been named after ice cream sandwiches, gingerbread and jelly beans. Naming it after a well-known brand, though, is a first. (We hardly knew ye, Android Key Lime Pie.) Is there more to this alliance? Will Nestle and Google somehow profit with money changing hands? Nope, says a Google spokesman. The KitKat promotion is just that — a promotion. Neither Google nor Nestle gets paid or pay as part of the accord. Still, KitKat packages will be graced with the familiar Android robot logo, and the two companies announced a sweepstakes for a limited number of robot-shaped KitKat candy bars, free Google Play app store credits and Nexus 7 tablets. But there will be plenty of marketing prowess on display. A verified Twitter account for KitKat, replete with the confectionery Android robot, retweeted praise for what many called Nestle’s marketing “win” and kept up with its own tweets. Google is only now getting to letter K in its march down the alphabet of OS names. What will future letters hold? Oreo? Whatchamacallit? Will OS names, like professional sports arenas, go to the highest bidder? Google isn’t saying.

 

Vodafone Decade of Patience Pays $125 Billion

Vodafone Decade of Patience Pays $125 Billion: Real M&A

Vodafone Group Plc (VOD)’s payout from a decadelong dance with Verizon Communications Inc. (VZ) over the fate of their U.S. wireless joint venture was worth the wait.

By holding off until now to sell its 45 percent stake in Verizon Wireless, Vodafone secured $130 billion, adding to more than $15 billion in dividend payouts since the venture was formed in 1999. With Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. estimating Vodafone’s initial investment at $20 billion, the company is getting as much as $125 billion more than that for a sixfold return, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Read more of this post

YouTube marketing pioneer BH Cosmetics named to the Inc 500, proving the power of online brand building

YouTube marketing pioneer BH Cosmetics named to the Inc 500, proving the power of online brand building

BY MICHAEL CARNEY 
ON SEPTEMBER 3, 2013

Nearly every brand and aspiring self promoter has a YouTube channel today that they use to “engage” with their fans. But this was hardly the case in 2009 when BH Cosmetics launched their first video content marketing initiative in 2009. At the time, BH founder Fred Sadovskiy, a former ad agency owner, was well ahead of his time. This foresight enabled the founders to build a massively popular online-only cosmetics brand without ever raising a dollar of outside financing. Last week, BH was named to the Inc 500 list (No. 448) as one of the fastest-growing private companies in America, a feat that Sadovskiy attributes largely to the more than 200,000 videos his company his published and the more than 100 million total video views they have amassed over the last four years. Read more of this post

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