Older adults who take blood pressure drugs have a greater risk of serious falls and related injuries, a new study reports

FEBRUARY 24, 2014, 4:00 PM  Comment

Blood Pressure Drugs Tied to Risk of Falls

By ANAHAD O’CONNOR

Older adults who take blood pressure drugs have a greater risk of serious falls, a new study reports.

Researchers looked at nearly 5,000 Americans over age 70 during a three-year period. They found that those who were taking antihypertensive medications had a 30 to 40 percent greater likelihood of experiencing severe fall-related injuries like hip fractures and head trauma. Read more of this post

Secrets of the Ages: A wide-ranging look at the puzzle of longevity, which varies across species in often confounding ways

FEBRUARY 24, 2014, 4:09 PM  1 Comment

Secrets of the Ages

By ABIGAIL ZUGER, M.D.

The Science of Life Span and Aging. By Jonathan Silvertown. University of ChicagoPress. 208 pages. $25.

Think too much about your life span and you will never get out of bed in the morning. Once you do, though, all the scientific mysteries of the subject may lie panting on the rug at your feet. Why should your good old faithful dog (avid exerciser, nonsmoker, nondrinker) be condemned to age and die after barely a decade, while you remain firmly in your prime — and the neighbor’s African gray parrot lives loudly on and on? Read more of this post

Genetically Modified Babies: Regulators consider radical biological procedures

Genetically Modified Babies

By MARCY DARNOVSKYFEB. 23, 2014

BERKELEY, Calif. — AN advisory committee of theFood and Drug Administration is set to begin two days of meetings tomorrow to consider radical biological procedures that, if successful, would produce genetically modified human beings. This is a dangerous step. These techniques would change every cell in the bodies of children born as a result of their use, and these alterations would be passed down to future generations. Read more of this post

Like Columbus, It Floated Here: The answer of how the useful plants got to the Americas has stumped scientists, until now. Using a relatively new type of genetic analysis, researchers found that bottle gourds floated to the Americas from Africa

Like Columbus, It Floated Here

By RACHEL NUWERFEB. 24, 2014

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Using a relatively new type of genetic analysis, researchers found that bottle gourds floated to the Americas from Africa. CreditCaraMaria

By the time Columbus arrived in the New World in 1492, bottle gourds had already conquered much of the globe. After evolving in Africa, one species,Lagenaria siceraria, made a break for East Asia around 11,000 years ago and eventually took up residence in Polynesia, China, Peru and beyond, earning the title of most widely distributed pre-Columbian domesticated plant. Read more of this post

Camels Linked to Spread of Deadly MERS Virus in People

Camels Linked to Spread of Deadly Virus in People

By DENISE GRADYFEB. 25, 2014

A new study suggests that camels are the major source of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral disease that has sickened 182 people and killed 79 of them since it was first detected in Saudi Arabia in 2012.

The animals are most likely to infect people through respiratory secretions — from coughing, sneezing, snorting or spitting — that travel through the air or cling to surfaces. Read more of this post

Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science: Could we teach courses to turn scientists into capable communicators? An actor with a love of science seeks to apply techniques of drama to help scientists be better communicators

Alan Alda, Spokesman for Science

FEB. 24, 2014

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The actor turned educator talks about how science can be made clearer and more accessible to the public if served with a helping of improvisation.

By CLAUDIA DREIFUS

CHICAGO — The most popular speaker at the recent meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science was not a scientist but one of science’s most high-profile advocates: the actor and writer Alan Alda. Read more of this post

The Brain’s Inner Language; scientists at Allen Institute for Brain Science are working with mice to decode what a mind’s neurons are saying to each other to produce behavior

The Brain’s Inner Language

By JAMES GORMANFEB. 24, 2014

Continue reading the main storyVideo

Probing the Parliament of Neurons

Clay Reid and colleagues are going deep into the mouse brain to decipher the conversations and decisions of neurons.

SEATTLE — When Clay Reid decided to leave his job as a professor at Harvard Medical School to become a senior investigator at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle in 2012, some of his colleagues congratulated him warmly and understood right away why he was making the move. Read more of this post

Pension Funds Sue on a Deal Gone Cold; Alphonse Fletcher Jr., a flashy hedge fund manager, has been accused of running something akin to a Ponzi scheme, and the pension systems that say he misled them are hoping to get their money back.

FEBRUARY 24, 2014, 9:51 PM  Comment

Pension Funds Sue on a Deal Gone Cold

By RACHEL ABRAMS

Sitting around a table in Baton Rouge, La., in February 2008, a handful of board members of the Firefighters’ Retirement System of Louisiana heard an investment pitch that would later come back to haunt them. Read more of this post

Steel Industry Feeling Stress as Automakers Turn to Aluminum

Steel Industry Feeling Stress as Automakers Turn to Aluminum

By JACLYN TROPFEB. 24, 2014

DEARBORN, Mich. — For nearly a century, Ford’s River Rouge factory and its neighboring steel mill have worked in close harmony to produce some of America’s most popular vehicles, from the Model A to the F-150 pickup truck. Read more of this post

Flappy Bird Copycats Keep on Flapping

FEBRUARY 24, 2014, 5:14 PM  Comment

Flappy Bird Copycats Keep on Flapping

By NICK BILTON

On Feb. 9, the Western world fell into chaos as Flappy Bird, a highly addictive game, was removed from mobile app stores by Dong Nguyen, an independent developer in Vietnam.

Since then, people have scrambled to create clones of Flappy Bird, including Fly Birdie, Flappy Bee, Flappy Plane and Ironpants, to satiate the addictive gaming habits of smartphone owners. Read more of this post

Loss Leaders on the Half Shell; A nationwide binge on oysters is transforming an industry (and restaurants’ economics).

Loss Leaders on the Half Shell

By KAREN STABINERFEB. 22, 2014

Connoisseurs across the country are binging on oysters. The trend is, at least in part, the result of a rapid growth of oyster farms on the East and West Coasts. Read more of this post

Dogs, humans have similar emotional reactions, new study says; Dogs and humans are far similar than originally thought.

Dogs, humans have similar emotional reactions, new study says

Dogs and humans are far similar than originally thought.

Science Recorder | Delila James | Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Dog-owners probably won’t be surprised to learn of a new scientific study showing their pets understand human emotions.

Researchers from Hungary’s ELTE University trained dogs to sit still in an MRI scanner to get images of their brains. They found that canine brains react to voices in the same way a human does, and that emotionally-charged vocal sounds, like laughter or weeping, caused similar responses in dogs and people. Read more of this post

S Korea’s Park forms special reunification panel

S Korea’s Park forms special reunification panel

Last Updated: Tuesday, February 25, 2014, 11:18

Seoul: South Korean President Park Geun-Hye announced Tuesday the creation of a committee under her direct control to work out “systematic and constructive” plans for reunification of the divided Korean peninsula.
The presidential committee will include experts from every sector of society and map out a blueprint for expanding inter-Korean dialogue and exchanges with a view to eventual unification.  Read more of this post

Chinese officials reportedly shut some businesses as pollution soars

Chinese officials reportedly shut some businesses as pollution soars

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China’s landmark CCTV buiiding, where state television is housed, could barely be seen in this photo of pedestrians walking near the Guomao subway station in Beijing.

BY STUART LEAVENWORTH

MCCLATCHY FOREIGN STAFF

BEIJING — China’s capital region remained swathed Monday in a cloud of choking smog, prompting a rise in hospital visits and sales of indoor air purifiers and reports of rare industry shutdowns. Read more of this post

Target Push Into Canada Stumbles: Shoppers’ habits and other factors figure into a projected $8 billion to $9 billion loss in the retailer’s first international expansion.

Target Push Into Canada Stumbles

By IAN AUSTENFEB. 24, 2014

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Anthony S. Fisher, the president of Target Canada, vowed to change how Canadians shop to get them accustomed to “one-stop shopping.” CreditGeoff Robins/Reuters

OTTAWA — When Canadians crossed the border into the United States on shopping excursions, Target was a prime destination. But when Target crossed the border last year and brought its stores to Canada, the magic somehow vanished. Read more of this post

In An Ad-mad World, Google Wants It All; Forget wearable computers and self-driving cars. The search giant will continue its dominance by sticking with its roots-taking $20 billion out of the hides of some very familiar companies

In An Ad-mad World, Google Wants It All

by Robert Hof | Feb 25, 2014

Forget wearable computers and self-driving cars. The search giant will continue its dominance by sticking with its roots—taking $20 billion out of the hides of some very familiar companies

It’s mid-September, and Volkswagen of America has a problem: It won’t have any new models coming out until the spring. Keeping VW front and centre in consumers’ minds has drawn a group of marketing folks from the automaker and two of its ad agencies to Google’s BrandLab at its YouTube headquarters south of San Francisco. Dedicated to “evangelising the art and science of brand-building”, the richly appointed meeting space is basically a man cave for ad creatives, complete with overstuffed couches, booze and the mother of all big screens, an assemblage of 32 flat-panel displays massed into 300 square feet of video overload. Read more of this post

How to manage from ‘the trenches’: Once you get to the top of the corporate ladder, there’s still plenty more to learn from the bottom.

How to manage from ‘the trenches’

February 24, 2014: 11:23 AM ET

Once you get to the top of the corporate ladder, there’s still plenty more to learn from the bottom.

By Kip Knight

FORTUNE – What has defined much of my career is a line from the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird: “You never really know a man until you understand things from his point of view, until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” Read more of this post

Chipotle’s Farmed and Dangerous ads: a lesson in ecosystem marketing; For marketers to capture their stakeholders’ imaginations, they need to think beyond company positioning and find a message that works for their entire business ecosystem

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5_D0rdqeAs

Chipotle’s Farmed and Dangerous ads: a lesson in ecosystem marketing

For marketers to capture their stakeholders’ imaginations, they need to think beyond company positioning and find a message that works for their entire business ecosystem Read more of this post

How to Get Over Your Inaction on Big Data

How to Get Over Your Inaction on Big Data

by Phil Simon  |   11:00 AM February 24, 2014

It’s common to see surveys, polls, and reports showing that “most” organizations are embracing big data. For instance, a 2013 Gartner survey found that 64% of enterprises were deploying or planning big data projects, up from 58% the year before. Read more of this post

Understand the Sacrifices Before Launching a Start-Up

Understand the Sacrifices Before Launching a Start-Up

by Frederic Kerrest  |   12:00 PM February 24, 2014

Making the decision to found your own business is a life-altering experience. Of course, it’s what comes after that breakthrough moment – how unique the idea, how quickly you move, how you continue to innovate – that ultimately separates the wheat from the chaff.   Read more of this post

The Best Way to Defuse Your Stress; Think of stress as a monster, who lives in your body and feeds on uncertainty. The monster’s most satisfying meal starts with the sentence: “What will happen if . . . . ?”

The Best Way to Defuse Your Stress

by Peter Bregman  |   2:00 PM February 24, 2014

I knew that I probably shouldn’t send the email I had just written. I wrote it in anger and frustration, and we all know that sending an email written in anger and frustration is, well, dumb.

Still, I really wanted to send it. So I forwarded it to a friend, who knew the situation, with the subject line: Should I send this? Read more of this post

Korea’s ancient history: “Hwandan Gogi,” translated as the “old records of bright heaven and Earth,” is a compilation of texts on ancient Korean history. “China and Japan invest heavily in their mythologies. Why don’t we do it as well?”

2014-02-24 17:01

Study of Korea’s ancient history put on back burner

Mainstream scholars ignore ‘Hwandan Gogi’ for lacking historical truth
By Chung Min-uck
The historical mindset of present Koreans is confined to the era of the three kingdoms (BC 57-AD 676) ― Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla ― that dominated the Korean peninsula until Silla set up a unified kingdom.
However, the study of ancient history has long been put on the back burner.
“Hwandan Gogi,” a compilation of texts on ancient Korean history published in 1979 written in ancient Chinese characters, has failed to attract attention, despite the history of Korea stretching out to as far as B.C. 8000 and covering not only the mainland China but some of the Middle Eastern region.
Notwithstanding the record’s value of redefining Korea’s ancient history, mainstream historians here have been neglecting “Hwandan Gogi,” thinking the book has been created in recent times to merely restore Korea’s nationalism.
“Hwandan Gogi” writes in its introduction that the book was “compiled by a historian named Gye Yeon-su in 1911,” which is a time when Korea was suffering under Japan’s 1910-45 colonial rule.
“The critics of the book refuse to even make public any discussions regarding the truth about its contents,” said Professor Lee Kang-sik of Gyeongju University in a recent lecture given to the public. “They are deliberately remaining in silence to avoid engaging in debate.”
Lee is one of the few historians here who view “Hwandan Gogi” as worthy of further study, believing that it is based on true historical facts.
Lee claims that former historians have misinterpreted the five organs, mentioned euphemistically using Chinese characters in the texts, as verbs, not nouns, which ruined the whole interpretation of its contents.
“When the words in the texts ― jugok, jumyung, juhyung, jubyung and jusunak ― are interpreted as nouns, it makes sense that they were the names for five government bodies back then and that they are based on Korea’s ancient religion of Heavenly Gods (Chunsingyo),” he said.
Chunsingyo is an indigenous religion of Korea that believes in the doctrine of Samsinoje, interpreted as the three creators and five rulers of heaven and Earth.
In an interview with The Korea Times, Lee further said, “None of the scholars have questioned my claims as of now.”
“But the mainstream academic circles have yet to support my theory,” he added. “However, I can see that they are unofficially showing interest to my work and hoping that they express their opinions in the near future.”
Besides Lee’s claims, there have been several pieces of evidence that prove the authenticity of the controversial book.
An astronomical record of BC 1733 recorded in the book that five stars were arranged in straight line back then was scientifically proven to be true, according to scientists.
Also, according to findings, the territory of one of Korea’s ancient kingdoms, Gojoseon, described in “Hwandan Gogi,” accords with the distribution area of the mandolin-shaped dagger of the kingdom, which further provided a basis for supporters of the book.
“The mainstreamers are denying the book illogically just because the book’s contents run counter to their religious or scholarly beliefs,” said an expert asking not to be named.
However, historians from mainstream academic circles and state-funded institutes have their own say.
“Words from modern Korean language are used in the texts of ‘Hwandan Gogi,’ the authenticity of the authors is unclear and the original 1911 edition of the book is missing,” said a scholar, on condition of anonymity. “Phrases have also been directly stolen from other history books and, moreover, include many unrealistic and religious descriptions.”
“Thus, it is difficult to take ‘Hwandan Gogi’ into consideration as Korea’s official history,” the scholar added. “I believe some of the non-mainstreamers are using the book to accuse the mainstreamers as having a colonial view of our history as opposed to their alleged nationalistic viewpoint.”
Academic papers on “Hwandan Gogi” are rarely found and state-run organizations barely touch on the subject, data shows.
Asked recently whether it plans to conduct research on “Hwadan Gogi” in the near future, one of the country’s biggest state-run history-related institutes said “no,” for some of the same reasons as mainstream historians.
In-depth research needed
Meanwhile, setting aside the ongoing strife between mainstreamers and non-mainstreamers over “Hwandan Gogi,” experts generally agree that it is still important to conduct in-depth research of the book not only because the strife must end, but for national interest as Korea faces historical warfare with two great neighboring powers, China and Japan.
Japan, during its colonization of the Korean peninsula, annihilated Korea’s ancient history by destroying over 200,000 history books in 1910.
Historians say the move led Koreans to consider Dangun, the founding king of Gojoseon, as a mythological figure until now. Dangun was always viewed as a true historical figure throughout Korean history, according to historians.
Japan, as of today, still tries to downplay Korean history by making unjustified claims that a southern part of the Korean territory was ruled by Japan during the Three Kingdoms era.
China has also been trying to distort Korean history by including Korea’s northeastern kingdoms of Goguryeo and Balhae as part of its history.
“We have no other choice but to study ‘Hwandan Gogi’ to know correctly about our ancient history,” said Lee.
“Just because some portion of the book has problems, it does not mean that the entire material of the book must be discarded,” stated Woo Dae-suk, a director of traditional Korean cultural studies, or Kookhakwon, in his research paper. “By studying ‘Hwandan Gogi’ in a sincere manner, our distorted history instigated by China and Japan can be adjusted.”
“China and Japan invest heavily in their mythologies,” said a professor, asking not to be named. “Why don’t we do it as well?”
What is ‘Hwandan Gogi’?
“Hwandan Gogi,” translated as the “old records of bright heaven and Earth,” is a compilation of texts on ancient Korean history. It has five volumes of historical records, namely, Samseonggi (1 and 2), Dangunsegi, Bukbuyeogi and Taebaekilsa, with different authors for the Silla, Goryeo and Joseon eras.
The book writes that it was compiled in 1911 by historian Gye Yeon-su and supervised by Yi Gi, an enlightenment thinker during the Joseon Kingdom (1392-1910). The only available copy now is activist Yi Yu-rip’s transcription, released in 1979.
The book describes Korea’s ancient kingdoms called Hwanguk that lasted for 3,301 years; and then Baedalguk that lasted 1,565 years; and the history of Gojoseon which had 47 generations of Dangun rulers, before the Three Kingdoms era began.
It also partially includes Korean history of the northeastern kingdoms of Goguryeo, Balhae and up until the Goryeo Kingdom (918-1392).

`Korean to be first Asian US president’; It wasn’t long ago that Koreans barely had a voice in American politics. Now, they’re quickly emerging as one of the most influential among Asian politicians

2014-02-24 19:55

`Korean to be first Asian US president’

By Jane Han

image001-15 Mark Keam, a delegate of the Virginia state Legislature

NEW YORK — It wasn’t long ago that Koreans barely had a voice in American politics. Now, they’re quickly emerging as one of the most influential among Asian politicians, so much so that one notable legislator says the first U.S. president of Asian descent will be Korean. Read more of this post

Kim Yuna and the Korean art of suffering; How Kim Yuna’s Olympic loss weighs on the heart of a nation.

Kim Yuna and the Korean art of suffering

How Kim Yuna’s Olympic loss weighs on the heart of a nation.

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South Korea’s Kim Yuna performs in the Women’s Figure Skating Free Program at the Iceberg Skating Palace during the Sochi Winter Olympics on February 20, 2014. (Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images)

SEOUL, South Korea — Call it the gasp heard round the world.

Olympic fans were aghast when Russia’s Adelina Sotnikova took the figure skating gold medal over South Korean uber-star Kim Yuna. You could almost imagine the collective shock measuring on the Richter scale. Read more of this post

Starbuck Korea 2013 revenue is estimated at 480 billion won ($453 million), up from 391 billion won in 2012

2014-02-23 13:14

What’s secret of success? – ‘It’s more than beans’

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By Lee Hyo-sik
Chung Ha-yeon, 26, is a self-proclaimed Starbucks fanatic. Not a single day goes by without Chung sipping a cup of fresh brew from the world’s largest coffee franchise.
“On the way to my office every morning, I always get Americano from a nearby Starbucks. I love the aroma of freshly brewed coffee in the morning,” Chung said. “On top of regular coffee products, I often enjoy Starbucks’ seasonal specialties all year around. I just tried the franchise’s latest ‘cherry blossom latte’ and ‘cherry blossom white chocolate.’ I just loved them.” Read more of this post

Air Purifier Rush as Smog Shrouds Northern China

Air Purifier Rush as Smog Shrouds Northern China

By Agence France-Presse on 11:53 am February 24, 2014.
Dangerous smog which has blighted swathes of northern China in recent days has prompted a spike in air purifier sales, local media reported Monday, as pollution continued to shroud Beijing. Read more of this post

Myanmar Maids Arrive in Hong Kong as Welfare Fears Grow

Myanmar Maids Arrive in Hong Kong as Welfare Fears Grow

By Agence France-Presse on 11:20 am February 25, 2014.

Hong Kong. Hong Kong on Monday received its first official group of maids from Myanmar since the former junta-ruled nation allowed its citizens to work abroad as domestic helpers, as the city tries to plug a shortage.

An initial group of 19 women — drawn from around 200 expected over the next three months — arrived in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory, said the agency which arranged their employment. Read more of this post

What Indonesia Needs Right Now Is Good Corporate Governance

What Indonesia Needs Right Now Is Good Corporate Governance

By Sarvesh Suri on 11:40 am February 23, 2014.
Indonesia’s economy is facing tough challenges: a slowdown of gross domestic product growth, depreciation of the rupiah and tightening of external financing. On the political side, the country is entering a period of uncertainty with upcoming legislative and presidential elections. Moreover, under current market conditions, companies are operating in ever tougher competitive environments. Read more of this post

India’s Zee to Offer Bollywood, Lifestyle TV

India’s Zee to Offer Bollywood, Lifestyle TV

By Muhamad Al Azhari on 10:30 am February 24, 2014.

Zee Entertainment Enterprises, one of India’s leading media and entertainment companies, is keen to tap the Indonesian pay-television market, banking on strong Indian influence on Indonesia’s culture, its founder and chairman has said. Read more of this post

Food manufacturers move in on thriving restaurant business

Food manufacturers move in on thriving restaurant business

The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | Business | Mon, February 24 2014, 12:21 PM

Food producers have increasingly moved into the restaurant business to gain footholds in the lucrative food-service industry, following the lead of beverage firm Rekso Group, which has run the fast-food restaurant chain McDonald’s since 2009. Read more of this post

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