DBS Bank To Acquire Société Générale’s Private Banking Business in Asia or 1.75% of $12.6 billion in assets under management

DBS Bank To Acquire Société Générale’s Private Banking Business in Asia

Singaporean Bank Seeks to Build on the Lucrative Wealth Management Business in the Region

P.R. VENKAT

March 16, 2014 7:36 p.m. ET

SINGAPORE—DBS Bank Ltd. Monday said that it has agreed to buy the Asian private banking business of French bank Société Générale SA GLE.FR -2.19% for $220 million, as the Singaporean bank seeks to build on the lucrative wealth management business in the region. Read more of this post

China’s Credit Nightmare Explained In One Chart

China’s Credit Nightmare Explained In One Chart

Tyler Durden on 03/14/2014 14:22 -0400

Everyone knows that after years of kicking the can and resolutely sticking its head in the sand, China is finally on the verge, if hasn’t already crossed it, of a major credit event, confirmed by the first ever corporate bond default which took place a week ago. Few, however, know just why China is in this untenable position. If we had to select one data point with which to explain it all, it would be the following: just in the fourth quarter of 2013, Chinese bank assets rose from CNY147 trillion to CNY151.4 trillion, or, in dollar terms, an increase of almost exactly $1 trillion! Read more of this post

Show Your Work!: 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered

Show Your Work!: 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered Paperback

by Austin Kleon  (Author)

In his New York Times bestseller Steal Like an Artist, Austin Kleon showed readers how to unlock their creativity by “stealing” from the community of other movers and shakers. Now, in an even more forward-thinking and necessary book, he shows how to take that critical next step on a creative journey—getting known. Read more of this post

A Short Guide to a Happy Life: Anna Quindlen on Work, Joy, and How to Live Rather Than Exist

A Short Guide to a Happy Life: Anna Quindlen on Work, Joy, and How to Live Rather Than Exist
image002-5The commencement address is a special kind of modern communication art, and its greatest masterpieces tend to either become a book – take, for instance, David Foster Wallace on the meaning of lifeNeil Gaiman on the resilience of the creative spiritAnn Patchett onstorytelling and belonging, and Joseph Brodsky on winning the game of life – or have originated from a book, such as Debbie Millman on courage and the creative life. One of the greatest commencement speeches of all time, however, has an unusual story that flies in the face of both traditional trajectories. Read more of this post

Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Crucial Difference Between Success and Mastery

Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Crucial Difference Between Success and Mastery

“You gotta be willing to fail… if you’re afraid of failing, you won’t get very far,” Steve Jobs cautioned“There is no such thing as failure – failure is just life trying to move us in another direction,” Oprah counseled new Harvard graduates. In his wonderfully heartening letter of fatherly advice, F. Scott Fitzgerald gave his young daughter Scottie a list of things to worry and not worry about in life; among the unworriables, he listed failure, “unless it comes through your own fault.” And yet, as Debbie Millman observed in Fail Safe, her magnificent illustrated-essay-turned-commencement-address, most of us “like to operate within our abilities” – stepping outside of them risks failure, and we do worry about it, very much. How, then, can we transcend that mental block, that existential worry, that keeps us from the very capacity for creative crash that keeps us growing and innovating? Read more of this post

Philosopher Martha Nussbaum on How to Live with Our Human Fragility

Philosopher Martha Nussbaum on How to Live with Our Human Fragility

In 1988, Bill Moyers produced a series of intelligent, inspiring, provocative conversations with a diverse set of cultural icons, ranging from Isaac Asimov to Noam Chomsky to Chinua Achebe. It was unlike any public discourse to have ever graced the national television airwaves before. The following year, the interviews were transcribed and collected in the magnificent tome Bill Moyers: World of Ideas (public library). But for all its evenness of brilliance, one conversation in the series stands out for its depth, dimension, intensity, and timelessness – that with philosopher Martha Nussbaum, one of the most remarkable and luminous minds of our time, who sat down to talk with Moyers shortly after the publication of enormously stimulating book The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy.

Moyers begins by framing Nussbaum’s singular approach to philosophy and, by extension, to the art of living:

MOYERS: The common perception of a philosopher is of a thinker of abstract thoughts. But stories and myths seem to be important to you as a philosopher. NUSSBAUM: Very important, because I think that the language of philosophy has to come back from the abstract heights on which it so often lives to the richness of everyday discourse and humanity. It has to listen to the ways that people talk about themselves and what matters to them. One very good way to do this is to listen to stories. Read more of this post

Show Your Work: Austin Kleon on the Art of Getting Noticed

Show Your Work: Austin Kleon on the Art of Getting Noticed
image002-1In 2012, artist Austin Kleon gave us Steal Like an Artist, a modern manifesto for combinatorial creativity that went on to become one of the best art books that year. He now returns with Show Your Work! (public library) – “a book for people who hate the very idea of self-promotion,” in which Kleon addresses with equal parts humility, honesty, and humor one of the quintessential questions of the creative life: How do you get “discovered”? In some ways, the book is the mirror-image of Kleon’s debut – rather than encouraging you to “steal” from others, meaning be influenced by them, it offers a blueprint to making your work influential enough to be theft-worthy. Complementing the advice is Kleon’s own artwork – his signature “newspaper blackout” poems – as a sort of meta-case for sharing as a modern art that requires courage, commitment, and creative integrity. Read more of this post

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