Why is it so expensive to build a bridge in America? The answer: Our greedy and undemocratic political culture

Why is it so expensive to build a bridge in America?

The answer: Our greedy and undemocratic political culture

By Ryan Cooper | March 10, 2014

It’s become commonplace to note that U.S. infrastructure costs are very high. What is less appreciated is the staggering scale of the difference between American infrastructure costs and those of other nations. Like our health care, U.S. infrastructure isn’t just a tad higher than the next most expensive country — we pay something like twice as much as our closest peer (usually the U.K., which is itself a very expensive place). And when you compare America to, say, Spain, we’re talking order-of-magnitude differences. Read more of this post

How Finance Gutted Manufacturing

How Finance Gutted Manufacturing

Since the 1980s, financial market pressures have driven companies to hive off activities that sustained manufacturing

Monday, March 10, 2014

In May 2013 shareholders voted to break up the Timken Company—a $5 billion Ohio manufacturer of tapered bearings, power transmissions, gears, and specialty steel—into two separate businesses. Their goal was to raise stock prices. The company, which makes complex and difficult products that cannot be easily outsourced, employs 20,000 people in the United States, China, and Romania. Ward “Tim” Timken, Jr., the Timken chairman whose family founded the business more than a hundred years ago, and James Griffith, Timken’s CEO, opposed the move. Read more of this post

10 Ways to Get Smarter, Be More Productive, and Do Everything with Zero Effort

10 Ways to Get Smarter, Be More Productive, and Do Everything with Zero Effort

March 9, 2014 by Shane Parrish

Why did you click? Was is for the promise of being awesome? Was it the ten ways to get smarter? Was it for the image that has nothing to do with the post? Read more of this post

Why venture capitalists are suddenly investing in news; “Suddenly, the market for content just opened up.”

Why venture capitalists are suddenly investing in news

By Adrienne LaFrance March 12, 2014

Something curious is happening in the American news business.

Media organizations are hiring again. Promising young reporters are leaving stalwart publications for new newsrooms. And venture capitalists are pouring millions into nimble publishing startups. It’s a rare moment of optimism for an industry accustomed to doom and gloom. Read more of this post

Will millennials kill Costco? It’s one of the benchmarks of suburban living. What happens when its customers are a generation that prefers urban living?

Will millennials kill Costco?

March 11, 2014: 1:50 PM ET

It’s one of the benchmarks of suburban living. What happens when its customers are a generation that prefers urban living?

By Brad Tuttle

The suburban, car-loving, McMansion-owning parents of millennials represent Costco’s (COST) core customer base. But what about millennials themselves? Read more of this post

As Stock Picking Comes Back In, ETF Use Goes Out

Mar 13, 2014

As Stock Picking Comes Back In, ETF Use Goes Out

DAN STRUMPF

Here’s the latest evidence that stock picking is back: Investors are buying and selling fewer exchange-traded funds.

As big macroeconomic headlines recede, ETFs are falling out of favor. ETF volumes have dipped this year to about 16.5% of total equity volumes, down from 16.7% in 2013, according to analysts at Credit SuisseCSGN.VX -1.59% Trading Strategy. The data suggest that investors are increasingly favoring trades in individual stocks. Read more of this post

If WhatsApp Is Worth $19B, Then WeChat’s Worth “At Least $60B” Says CLSA

If WhatsApp Is Worth $19B, Then WeChat’s Worth “At Least $60B” Says CLSA

Posted yesterday by Ingrid Lunden (@ingridlunden)

Heads turned when Facebook forked out $19 billion for messaging service WhatsApp in February, and eyes popped when Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said it was probably worth even more. Now, analysts over at Crédit Lyonnais Securities Asia have taken up the baton on outsized messaging app valuations: it says that WeChat, a Chinese competitor owned by Tencent, is worth “at least $60 billion,” because of the fact that it has more active revenues streams incorporated into its service than WhatsApp does. Read more of this post

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