Critically ill patients who survive a stay in an intensive-care unit, where they are often heavily sedated and ventilated, can find themselves mentally impaired long after release. A new study says the problem is far more common and lasting than previously believed

Updated October 2, 2013, 5:40 p.m. ET

Intensive-Care Units Pose Long-Term Brain Risk, Study Finds

LAURA LANDRO

Critically ill patients who survive a stay in an intensive-care unit, where they are often heavily sedated and ventilated, can find themselves mentally impaired long after release. A new study says the problem is far more common and lasting than previously believed. Nearly 80% of patients with prolonged ICU stays showed cognitive problems a year or more later, and more than half exhibited effects similar to Alzheimer’s disease and traumatic brain injury, according to a report Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. Read more of this post

8 Common Thinking Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day And How To Prevent Them

8 Common Thinking Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day And How To Prevent Them

BELLE BETH COOPERBUFFER 34 MINUTES AGO 0

Get ready to have your mind blown.

I was seriously shocked at some of these mistakes in thinking that I subconsciously make all the time. Obviously, none of them are huge, life-threatening mistakes, but they are really surprising and avoiding them could help us to make more rational, sensible decisions. Being aware of the mistakes we naturally have in our thinking can make a big difference in avoiding them. Unfortunately, most of these occur subconsciously, so it will also take time and effort to avoid them—if you even want to. Regardless, I think it’s fascinating to learn more about how we think and make decisions every day, so let’s take a look at some of these thinking habits we didn’t know we had.

1. We surround ourselves with information that matches our beliefs

We tend to like people who think like us. If we agree with someone’s beliefs, we’re more likely to be friends with them. While this makes sense, it means that we subconsciously begin to ignore or dismiss anything that threatens our world views, since we surround ourselves with people and information that confirm what we already think. This is called confirmation bias. If you’ve ever heard of the frequency illusion, this is very similar. The frequency illusion occurs when you buy a new car, and suddenly you see the same car everywhere. Or when a pregnant woman suddenly notices other pregnant women all over the place. It’s a passive experience, where our brains seek out information that’s related to us, but we believe there’s been an actual increase in the frequency of those occurrences. Confirmation bias is a more active form of the same experience. It happens when we proactively seek out information that confirms our existing beliefs. Not only do we do this with the information we take in, but we approach our memories this way, as well. In an experiment in 1979 at the University of Minnesota, participants read a story about a women called Jane who acted extroverted in some situations and introverted in others. When the participants returned a few days later, they were divided into two groups. One group was asked if Jane would be suited to a job as a librarian, the other group were asked about her having a job as a real-estate agent. The librarian group remembered Jane as being introverted and later said that she would not be suited to a real-estate job. The real-estate group did the exact opposite: they remembered Jane as extroverted, said she would be suited to a real-estate job and when they were later asked if she would make a good librarian, they said no. In 2009, a study at Ohio State showed that we will spend 36 percent more time reading an essay if it aligns with our opinions. Whenever your opinions or beliefs are so intertwined with your self-image you couldn’t pull them away without damaging your core concepts of self, you avoid situations which may cause harm to those beliefs. – David McRaney This trailer for David McRaney’s book, You are Now Less Dumb, explains this concept really well with a story about how people used to think geese grew on trees (seriously), and how challenging our beliefs on a regular basis is the only way to avoid getting caught up in the confirmation bias: Read more of this post

How Japanese clothing brand Uniqlo aims to be No.1 in the world

How Japanese clothing brand Uniqlo aims to be No.1 in the world

PUBLISHED: 02 OCT 2013 19:49:00 | UPDATED: 03 OCT 2013 08:33:39

The Australian Financial Review

BY SUE MITCHELL

Uniqlo local chief Shoichi Miyasak says: “Our objective is to become the world number one by year 2020 – in order for us to meet that level, becoming the number one in Australia is a thing we have to do.” Photo: Nic Walker

Fast Retailing’s Uniqlo brand is so ubiquitous in Japan that one in four Japanese are estimated to own its trademark down jackets and wearing the brand even has its own word – unibare. Uniqlo may never become a household name in Australia, but its local chief, Shoichi Miyasaka, wants the brand to become the market leader in casual wear – overtaking long-established brands such as Just Jeans and General Pants as well as newcomers such as Top Shop – as part of Fast Retailing’s goal to become the world’s leading clothing company. Read more of this post

All entrepreneurs are united by the fear of failure; For every business that makes it, four crumble away to nothing, says entrepreneur Michael Hayman. Too often, failure is swept under the carpet

All entrepreneurs are united by the fear of failure

For every business that makes it, four crumble away to nothing, says entrepreneur Michael Hayman. Too often, failure is swept under the carpet.

When talking about the success of retailer Carphone Warehouse, founder Charles Dunstone joked, “I got away with it”. Photo: Rex Features

By Michael Hayman

4:57PM BST 30 Sep 2013

“I got away with it.” The words Carphone Warehouse founder Sir Charles Dunstone hopes will be etched as an epitaph on his gravestone. Words that have stuck in my mind since I heard him say them. In one short sentence he captured the least told chapter in the life story of many of our greatest entrepreneurs. That there rarely is a grand plan in place and that failure, and the fear of, it is every bit the co-pilot of success. Read more of this post

Talk of Inheritance Tax Sparks Debate in China

October 3, 2013, 8:30 AM

Talk of Inheritance Tax Sparks Debate in China

Whether or not to tax the dead has become a big question in China.

The country doesn’t currently have an inheritance tax—also commonly known as the death or estate tax—a levy paid by people who inherit money or property, or a tax on someone’s estate after they die. But a recent media report has sparked discussion about whether China should start levying such a tax, and if so, how heavy rates should be. The private 21st Century Business Herald reported (in Chinese) on Sept. 27 that the Communist Party’s top decision makers will consider the inheritance tax at the Third Plenum, a key meeting of senior leaders expected in November, citing Liu Heng, an academic adviser to the nation’s State Council, or cabinet. Read more of this post

Maoist Self-Criticism Comes to a TV Near You

Maoist Self-Criticism Comes to a TV Near You

On the evening of Sept. 25, Xi Jinping debuted in his role as China’s father-confessor across state-owned television stations. The occasion was the conclusion of three days of self-criticism sessions that the Chinese president oversaw in Hebei province. Wearing his signature black jacket and open-collared white shirt, Xi sat listening to nervous high-ranking local officials. They had reason to be worried: According to Xinhua News Agency, the state newswire, Xi had stern expectations for what would be accomplished (according to official press accounts, he attended four half-day sessions): “I don’t want to hear fancy words from you when I take part in your sessions. I want real criticisms and self-criticisms.” Read more of this post

China’s Poisoned Air Prompts Woman to Devise Green Tax

China’s Poisoned Air Prompts Woman to Devise Green Tax

Reading in her hotel room in 1996, geology student Cao Jing noticed something alarming: the pages of her book were being coated with brown coal dust. Her realization — in Qinhuangdao, a tourist city where China’s Great Wall meets the sea — marks the moment when the young undergraduate at Beijing’s Tsinghua University became interested in studying the effects of China’s runaway industrial pollution. It was the first step in a 17-year journey that has taken Cao, 36, into the field of economics to tackle emissions in the world’s biggest producer of greenhouse gases. Read more of this post

Former Leighton Holdings’ chief executive Wal King has denied claims he was aware of bribery and fraud allegations made against the building giant

Leighton denies culture of corruption and cover-ups

October 3, 2013 – 11:16AM

Bribery scandal engulfs Leighton Holdings

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Leighton Holdings is once again facing scrutiny over its business practices following the release of internal documents. Former Leighton Holdings’ chief executive Wal King has denied claims he was aware of bribery and fraud allegations made against the building giant. Mr King’s comments came as Leighton Holdings said it was “deeply concerned” about bribery and fraud allegations made against the firm, but denied it had a culture of corruption and cover-ups. Read more of this post

Lego to Boost China Sales With Local Factories Supplying to Asia

Lego to Boost China Sales With Local Factories Supplying to Asia

Lego A/S, Europe’s biggest toymaker, plans to expand its sales in China as rising urbanization and income boost demand for its building-blocks in the world’s most-populous nation. Lego is building manufacturing facilities in China to serve both the country and across Asia, Chief Executive Officer Joergen Vig Knudstorp said yesterday. The region contributes about 10 percent of revenue, he said. Read more of this post

Big Tobacco’s Electronic Shock: Lorillard Makes Another Bet on E-Cigarettes With Skycig, and Industry Risks Suggest Such Deals Could Also Be Worthwhile for Altria and Reynolds American

October 2, 2013, 2:56 p.m. ET

Big Tobacco’s Electronic Shock

Lorillard Makes Another Bet on E-Cigarettes With Skycig, and Industry Risks Suggest Such Deals Could Also Be Worthwhile for Altria and Reynolds American

JOHN JANNARONE

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Big Tobacco has largely stayed on familiar turf in recent years. Now, it is expanding its horizons. LorillardLO +0.60% the No. 3 U.S. tobacco company by market value after Altria Group MO +0.12% and Reynolds AmericanRAI -0.16% has agreed to pay up to $100 million for Skycig, a U.K.-based maker of electronic cigarettes. That follows a $135 million deal last year to buy blu eCigs, a big U.S. brand. Read more of this post

Is Tesco’s dream of building an international empire unravelling?

Is Tesco’s dream of building an international empire unravelling?

When Sir Terry Leahy took Tesco into the US in 2007, he was driven by the knowledge that the company had seemingly achieved success in international markets as diverse as Poland, Ireland, South Korea and Thailand.

Tesco chief executive Philip Clarke said the company is making progress on improving its performance Photo: Reuters

By Graham Ruddick, Retail Correspondent

11:12AM BST 02 Oct 2013

After Tesco became the biggest food retailer in the UK in 1995, Sir Terry and his management team had set their sights on international domination. The company became a market leader in parts of Asia of Eastern Europe, which prompted Tesco to believe it could prosper in the US with its new Fresh & Easy venture. Read more of this post

To help boost sales of men’s casual wear last month, Lotte Department Shin Heon started to wear jeans to work and encouraged other top officials to do the same

Lotte CEO looking for a little magic

Oct 03,2013

Shin Heon, Lotte Department Store CEO, wearing a navy suit with a red bow tie, entertained 100 or so customers at its department stores in downtown Seoul yesterday with the help of magician Lee Eun-kyul. The show lasted for half an hour. The magic show, presented by the top executive of one of the nation’s leading retailers, was part of a strategy to boost sales as Lotte along with Hyundai Department Store and Shinsegae Department Store, which all started their autumn sales yesterday.  Read more of this post

Samsung’s family feud under way over inheritance

Samsung’s family feud under way over inheritance

Sohn Jae-gwon

2013.10.02 14:25:02

“Late chairman Lee Byung-chul, founder of Samsung Group, did not want the current chairman Lee Kun-hee to inherit the conglomerate singlehandedly. The founder formed a group ‘Seung-ji’ to reach major decisions concerning Samsung Group.” “No. The deceased founder set up the Seung-ji in an effort to allow Lee Kun-hee to have management right overarching other subsidiaries.” The legal dispute between the late founder’s eldest son, Lee Maeng-hee, and Samsung Group is shifting its focus to Seung-ji group and what the founder intended to accomplish with the group. In the second round of a civil appeal case brought to the Seoul High Court Tuesday, lawyers representing Lee Maeng-hee, former chairman of Cheil Fertilizer, said “the late chairman created Seung-ji group to check Lee Kun-hee’s sole inheritance of management right,” unveiling Seung-ji group publicly for the first time. Both Lee Maeng-hee and Samsung Group acknowledge the existence of Seung-ji group. Reportedly, late Samsung founder Lee Byung-chul ordered five figures – then Samsung Group’s chief secretary, chairman Lee Kun-hee, Shinsegae Group chairwoman Lee Myung-hee and Lee Mang-hee’s wife Sohn Bok-nam – to discuss major issues at the ‘Seungji’ meeting. “The existence of ‘Seung-ji’ lies in leading Samsung Group under five leaders, not solely by Lee Kun-hee,” noted a close aid to Lee Mang-hee. However, Samsung noted, “Lee Kun-hee had willingness to succeed the group and other companies including Cheiljedang (currently CJ) whose ownership is transferred to other brothers and sisters should be under the control of Lee Kun-hee as well.”

Korean retailers fostering fashion brands; Homeplus, Korea’s No. 2 supermarket chain run by British retail giant Tesco, first introduced their fashion brand Florence& Fred in 2010

2013-10-02 17:53

Retailers fostering fashion brands

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Seen above is the inside of a Florence & Fred store run by the country’s second largest retailer Homeplus. The fashion brand was launched in 2010 in Korea

By Rachel Lee
The country’s major retailers are stepping up efforts to grow their own fashion brands to the level where they can compete with the world’s global SPA brands.
SPA brands are those that produce their own clothing, distribute and sell it exclusively. Names such as H&M, Zara and Uniqlo are classified as SPA brands
According to industry sources, large discount chains including E-Mart and Homeplus have been aiming to do the same with their fashion labels Daiz and Florence& Fred, by launching and expanding the range of high quality products at competitive price. Read more of this post

Prosecutors are investigating Hyosung Group Chairman Cho Suck-rae for allegedly creating a massive slush fund and evading taxes

2013-10-02 17:11

Hyosung under prosecutors’ probe

By Kim Tae-jong

Prosecutors are investigating Hyosung Group Chairman Cho Suck-rae for allegedly creating a massive slush fund and evading taxes, sources said Wednesday.
The move could potentially result in Cho becoming yet another ill-fated conglomerate owner who may be put on trial and jailed, following Hanhwa Group Chairman Kim Seung-youn, SK Holdings Chairman Chey Tae-won and CJ Group Chairman Lee Jae-hyun. Read more of this post

Criticism mounts of FSS oversight of debt-ridden Tongyang

 

Criticism mounts of FSS oversight of Tongyang

 

‘There’s growing doubt over the role of the financial regulator.’

 

Oct 03,2013

 

In June, a 47-year-old office worker surnamed Jeong received a call from an employee at Tongyang Securities, the brokerage arm of debt-ridden Tongyang Group. According to Jeong, he was introduced to investing in bonds issued by the conglomerate and was told he would get an annual interest rate of 7 percent, more than three times higher than the market average. Read more of this post

How Prime Focus Broke into Hollywood; Prime Focus started out as a teenager’s garage operation in Mumbai and is now a global force in the post-production of films

How Prime Focus Broke into Hollywood

by Sohini Mitter, Deepak Ajwani | Oct 2, 2013

Prime Focus started out as a teenager’s garage operation in Mumbai and is now a global force in the post-production of films

Prime Focus.indd topimg_22577_namit_malhotra_600x400

Namit Malhotra, founder, chairman and CEO of Prime Focus Ltd

The 2011 Academy Awards saw 10 nominations in the VFX (visual effects) category. Of these, five films (including X-Men: First Class, Transformers: Dark of the Moon and The Tree of Life) had engaged an Indian company for 2D-to-3D conversion and post-production work. Prime Focus Limited (PFL), a global visual entertainment services company, has been instrumental in altering the Hollywood perception that only US-based studios excelled in visual effects, 3D and animation. Today, 40 percent of Hollywood’s VFX and 3D work gets done in Asian countries like India, Malaysia, South Korea, Thailand and the Philippines, says a 2013 KPMG report.  Read more of this post

Port Expansion Trimmed as Slowdown Dents Trade: Corporate India

Port Expansion Trimmed as Slowdown Dents Trade: Corporate India

India plans to cut back expansion of a port that helps Ford Motor Co. (F) and Hyundai Motor Co. ship cars after an economic slowdown and rival facilities dented traffic for the first time in seven years. The Chennai Port Trust, which started 128 years ago in the southern Indian city, is hiring a consultant to help review its plans and advise on a reduced capacity, Chairman Atulya Misra said in an e-mail interview. The state-owned operator scrapped a bid this year to build a terminal that would have more than doubled its ability to handle 20-foot standard boxes or TEUs. Read more of this post

India’s Wealthy Must Open Their Gates and Fight Chaos

India’s Wealthy Must Open Their Gates and Fight Chaos

Lately India has been in the news for all the wrong reasons. Its once tigerish economy is growing at its slowest rate in more than a decade. Newspapers are filled with ever more depressing stories of rape, official plunder and gut-wrenching poverty. To an outsider the headlines can seem surreal: Last week the cabinet actually voted to allow convicted criminals to serve in Parliament and state legislatures, before being forced to back down. Read more of this post

India’s dangerous political vacuum

September 30, 2013 6:35 pm

India’s dangerous political vacuum

As elections loom, voters confront a dearth of good options

In times of crisis, people turn to desperate solutions. In India, desperation has a name: Narendra Modi. Mr Modi, once politically crippled by his alleged complicity in the killings of several hundred Muslims in Gujarat, is visibly edging towards the premiership. Business, especially, is turning towards him as a saviour. Read more of this post

Dividend stocks are losing their allure

October 2, 2013 1:28 pm

Dividend stocks are losing their allure

By John Authers

Post-Lehman outperformance has reversed in US since ‘taper talk’ began

For a while, dividend investing paid dividends like never before. And then, five months ago, it stopped. There are ways for investors to take advantage, but they are counter-intuitive. In the post-Lehman years, investors put more weight than ever on the dividend yield they received from equities. In some ways, this was irrational. Under the Miller and Modigliani framework, still taught in business schools, they should have known that dividend yield makes no difference. Cash belongs to the investor whether it stays in the company’s bank account or is paid out in a cheque. If you need income, you can just sell some shares. For many decades, investors took M&M seriously, and yields dwindled. Read more of this post

Twitter ad strategy aims to be on target as it looks beyond US

October 2, 2013 3:11 pm

Twitter ad strategy aims to be on target as it looks beyond US

By Rob Budden in London and April Dembosky in San Francisco

Twitter was relatively late to the advertising game, but as its market debut looms, it is making up for lost time, and a big part of the catching up is happening outside of its core US market. In the past few months, the site has opened a number of offices outside the US as it begins to sell advertising internationally. In addition to the US, Twitter now has sales teams in eight other countries including Brazil, France, Japan and the UK. It is also working with resellers in theMiddle East and Africa, in southeast Asia, and in Spanish-speaking Latin America. The US still accounts for the lion’s share of revenues – about 83 per cent of estimated global ad revenues of $580m for Twitter, according to eMarketer. But revenues in the rest of the world are growing fast. By 2015, non-US countries are expected to make up almost a quarter of Twitter’s total revenues, the research company predicts, helping propel a doubling of ad revenues next year to $950m. Read more of this post

Techs eye Japan’s ‘keiretsu’ as VC model

Last updated: October 2, 2013 8:47 pm

Techs eye Japan’s ‘keiretsu’ as VC model

By Richard Waters

Groups seeking venture capital success must mimic Japan’s example

When big corporations jump on the venture capital bandwagon, it is often an indication that a start-up investment cycle has peaked. Incumbents usually wake up to the idea of backing a new band of disruptive companies – some of which are out to eat their lunch – only when it is already too late. If so, then the extra $650m that SAP has just ploughed into venture capital – boosting the firepower of its venture investment arm to about $1bn – looks like a clear “sell” signal. As Nino Marakovic, head of SAP Ventures, ruefully puts it: “Corporations normally get in at the top and out at the bottom, which is exactly the wrong way to do it.” Read more of this post

The Death Of Social ROI — Companies Are Starting To Drop The The Idea That They Can Track Social Media’s Dollar Value

The Death Of Social ROI — Companies Are Starting To Drop The The Idea That They Can Track Social Media’s Dollar Value

JOHN HEGGESTUEN OCT. 2, 2013, 4:00 PM 2,066 2

social marketers-1

Many brands are moving away from metrics that purport to measure ROI on social media. They’ve realized that social media isn’t a transactional engine or sales machine, so they’re dropping half-baked indicators that gauge secondary effects, such as financial return. Instead, the new metrics evaluate social media strategies in terms of audience-building, brand awareness, and customer relations. In a new report from BI Intelligence, we look at the no-frills but powerful metrics that social media managers and analytics companies are focusing on, we explain how the end of the vogue for ROI has not meant a pullback on social media budgets (in fact, social media budgets are ballooning). And we dig into some of the misconceptions and misuses surrounding the more common reach and engagement metrics popularized by Facebook Insights, the built-in analytics dashboard for Facebook pages. Here’s how social media strategies are evolving:  Read more of this post

Social Networks in a Battle for the Second Screen

October 2, 2013

Social Networks in a Battle for the Second Screen

By VINDU GOEL and BRIAN STELTER

After “Breaking Bad” drew 10.3 million viewers to one of the most crowd-satisfying finales in television history on Sunday, Twitter and Facebook raced to tell the news media about the throngs who shared their instant reactions to the show on the social networks. The companies were seeking more than just bragging rights. Facebook and Twitter both see the social conversation around television as a way to increase use of their sites and win a bigger piece of advertisers’ spending, which eMarketer estimates will be $171 billion across all types of media this year in the United States. In recent months, they have engaged in an escalating battle — publicly and behind the scenes — to claim the title of the nation’s digital water cooler as they woo networks and advertisers. Read more of this post

A Watch That Sinks Under Its Features; Samsung’s Galaxy Gear watch is ambitious and even amazing. But it has too many components for one gadget.

October 2, 2013

A Watch That Sinks Under Its Features

By DAVID POGUE

In the beginning, computers were the size of buildings. To use one, you walked into it. Over the decades, they grew small enough to sit on a desk, then to carry in a briefcase, then to keep in your pocket. And now we’re entering the age of computers so small we wear them like jewelry. Just what kind of jewelry, however, has yet to be decided. Will we wear our computers on our foreheads, as with Google Glass? Or will we wear them on our wrists, as with the new Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatch ($300)? Read more of this post

In Taiwan you can buy an Android tablet from 7-11 for $200

In Taiwan you can buy an Android tablet from 7-11 for $200

October 2, 2013

by Josh Horwitz

OpenTabletDongle-720x458

As mobile technology becomes cheaper to manufacture, an increasing number of low-end brands have emerged, selling simple devices at affordable prices. In Taiwan, one of these brands happens to be 7-11, the world-famous convenience store chain. The Taiwanese 7-11 (owned by domestic conglomerate Uni-President, and unaffiliated with the pit stop C-store most Americans are familiar with) announced yesterday it would release a private label tablet called “OPEN.” Manufactured by Taiwan electronics giant Foxconn, the device runs on Android 4.2 Jelly Bean and packs a quad-core 1.2 GHz Marvell processor, 16GB of storage, and 1GB of RAM.  Read more of this post

Merck believes ‘printable’ big OLEDs not far off

Merck believes ‘printable’ big OLEDs not far off

Oct 03,2013

Merck, a German-based chemical and pharmaceutical company, believes printable organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays could be manufactured commercially within three years, allowing mass production of large displays. “You have to ask Samsung or LG for the exact date, but what I can tell you is that we have material available that serves that purpose,” said Walter Galinat, president of performance materials for Merck, who visited Korea for the “Displaying Futures” symposium yesterday in Seoul. ”We have manufactured displays in printing, and they worked very well.”  Read more of this post

Shares in accounting software start-up Xero have surged back towards all-time highs after it boasted it now has more clients in Australia than in its home turf, New Zealand, as it ramps up its global push

Sales soar as Xero ramps up global push

October 3, 2013 – 10:49AM

Brian Robins

Shares in accounting software start-up Xero have surged back towards all-time highs after it boasted it now has more clients in Australia than in its home turf, New Zealand, as it ramps up its global push. In the September half, revenues surged to $NZ30 million ($27 million) from $NZ16.9 million a year earlier, whikle at the end of the half, revenue was running at an annualised $NZ70 million. Read more of this post

iCar Asia’s growth strategy: Make a “land grab” on Asia’s car classifieds

Nassim Khadem Reporter

iCar Asia’s growth strategy: Make a “land grab” on Asia’s car classifieds

Published 02 October 2013 11:50, Updated 03 October 2013 07:38

Since iCar Asia, the company backed by BRW Young Rich lister Patrick Grove, secured a $13.4 million investment from Australia’s largest car sale website, Carsales.com, its share price has soared. Based in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, iCar Asia is the largest network of online automotive sites in ASEAN, reaching 2.5 million people every month across Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia. Read more of this post

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