Jakarta Governor Joko Fires City Employee, But Not Agency Head, for Playing Video Games; “It’s actually alright to play games, but they should be able to process [permit applications] in five minutes”; Jokowi to wield axe in effort to slim down city’s bureaucracy

Joko Fires City Employee for Playing Video Games: Report

By SP/Deti Mega Purnamasari on 5:16 pm October 18, 2013.
Jakarta Governor Joko Widodo did not say a word to the employee caught playing video games during a surprise visit to the offices of the city’s small-and-medium enterprises agency. But on his way out of the building, Joko told his assistant to take down the employee’s name so that he could be fired. “It’s actually alright to play games, but they should be able to process [permit applications] in five minutes,” Joko said later, according to Indonesian news portal Merdeka.com. “But if they need two weeks to process [permits], how can they play games?” He visited the East Jakarta offices unannounced on Friday — the second time he has done so. Accompanied by East Jakarta Mayor H.R. Krisdianto and integrated services (PTSP) head Husnul Chotimah, Joko proceeded directly to the PTSP offices.

“How does one get a SIUP [business permit]?” he asked an employee. “How many days does it take? Where should I go after this?”

“Three days, sir,” the official reportedly replied,

But an applicant named Rofi Nata who was in line for a permit told the governor that the process takes two weeks. Joko went to the third floor, bringing with him a list of the companies and business that had registered for permits. He asked office staff there to teach him how to input the information so that he could do it himself.

“How do I input this?” he asked. “What’s the password?”

Office staff told him that agency head Johan Afandithe was the only one who knew the password, but he was nowhere to be found and no one knew where he was. At this point, Joko reportedly saw an employee trying to covertly close down a computer game he had been playing. The governor threw the papers he had been holding onto a table, asked for the names of all third floor staff, and while two officials tried to explain the situation, he walked to his car without speaking and slammed the door. PTSP is still a pilot project in Jakarta. The governor made his first unannounced visit there on July 16. Back at City Hall, Joko said the agency needed to become more efficient. “The speed should be faster,” he said. “Just type some sentences, input the information, fill in the form, type it, enter, sign it and issue it. It’s not difficult.” Read more of this post

A New Map of How We Think: Top Brain/Bottom Brain: Forget dated ideas about the left and right hemispheres. New research provides a more nuanced view of how we plan our lives and experience the world. Which cognitive mode best describes you?

A New Map of How We Think: Top Brain/Bottom Brain

Forget dated ideas about the left and right hemispheres. New research provides a more nuanced view of the brain

STEPHEN M. KOSSLYN and G. WAYNE MILLER

Oct. 18, 2013 7:57 p.m. ET

Who hasn’t heard that people are either left-brained or right-brained—either analytical and logical or artistic and intuitive, based on the relative “strengths” of the brain’s two hemispheres? How often do we hear someone remark about thinking with one side or the other? A flourishing industry of books, videos and self-help programs has been built on this dichotomy. You can purportedly “diagnose” your brain, “motivate” one or both sides, indulge in “essence therapy” to “restore balance” and much more. Everyone from babies to elders supposedly can benefit. The left brain/right brain difference seems to be a natural law. Read more of this post

Investing for the Fun of It: Many fans of stock indexing set a little money aside to bet on riskier investments. Here’s how to do it safely.

Investing for the Fun of It: Many fans of stock indexing set a little money aside to bet on riskier investments. Here’s how to do it safely.

LIAM PLEVEN

Oct. 18, 2013 6:06 p.m. ET

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Investors flock to index funds because they are simple, inexpensive and often likely to generate higher returns than taking a chance on hot stocks, highflying money managers or a brother-in-law’s tips. The hitch: Passive is dull, as even its fans admit. John Miller, a partner in a Fayetteville, Ga., law firm, set up an account several years ago with about 5% of his investments and started buying individual stocks. Most of his investments are in index funds. He placed a wager on Bank of AmericaBAC -0.20% stock when prices were near financial-crisis lows, and won big. He also purchased shares in a solar-energy firm that he says fell about 85% before he sold. Through it all, he enjoyed himself—without worrying that a disastrous bet would ruin his financial future. Read more of this post

Datuk Soh Chee Wen and the Blumont-Asiason-LionGold saga; Every counter that Datuk Soh Chee Wen owned in Malaysia used to be sought after by punters and market players because their gains were extraordinary

Updated: Saturday October 19, 2013 MYT 7:43:02 AM

Lim, Azlan claim no link to Soh

BY B.K. SIDHU

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Soh has been s een as a prominen t mark e t play er in the Malay sian and Singaporean stock exchang es for more than a decade . DATUK Jared Lim and Datuk Mohamed Azlan Hashim have denied any links to tycoon Datuk Soh Chee Wen, whose name has become a topic of conversation at coffee tables and trading rooms of late. The reason is the spectacular rise and collapse of shares in three Singapore companies recently which begs the question as to who is behind the volatile movements of the counters. Lim and Azlan are the Malaysian shareholders in SGX listed-Asiasons Capital, one of the three companies whose share prices once recorded extraordinary gains but caused a mayhem when they plummeted beginning Oct 3. The other two companies are Blumont Group and LionGold Group. Read more of this post

Innovative dynamism is the key to economic success and personal satisfaction, Nobel-winner Edmund Phelps argues in ‘Mass Flourishing’

Book Review: ‘Mass Flourishing’ by Edmund Phelps

Innovative dynamism is the key to economic success and personal satisfaction, a Nobel-winner argues

EDWARD GLAESER

Oct. 18, 2013 5:22 p.m. ET

Edmund Phelps’s “Mass Flourishing” could easily be retitled “Contra-Corporatism,” for at its heart this fine book is an attack on that increasingly common “third way” between capitalism and socialism. Mr. Phelps cogently argues that America’s current economic woes reflect a reduction in the innovative dynamism that generates economic success and personal satisfaction. He places little hope in the Democratic Party, which “voices a new corporatism well beyond Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal or Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society,” or in Republicans in the thrall of “traditional values,” who see “the good economy as mercantile capitalism plus social protection and social insurance.” He instead yearns for legislative solons who “could usefully ask of every bill and regulatory directive: How would it impact the dynamism of our economy?” Read more of this post

Hans Riegel, the eccentric billionaire confectioner who gave gummi bears their global bite

October 18, 2013 7:28 pm

Hans Riegel, confectioner who gave gummi bears their global bite

By Michael Steen

For nearly seven decades, Hans Riegel was the eccentric chief confectioner, autocratic business leader and one-man marketing machine who propelled Haribo, purveyor of colourful fruit-flavoured “gummi bears”, from a Bonn backstreet to an envied prominence in global confectionery. Riegel represented, in concentrated form, traits typical of Germany’s family-owned Mittelstand companies. As the business grew, he flew Willy Wonka-like in the face of modern corporate convention, eschewing everything from market research to bank loans and opportunities to take the group public. Read more of this post

Lego builds a solid business, even in the age of multimedia; Lego CEO doesn’t give out business cards when he goes to a meeting. Instead, he fishes out a tiny plastic Lego figurine bearing his likeness

PUBLISHED OCTOBER 19, 2013

Lego builds a solid business, even in the age of multimedia

World’s No 2 toymaker sets up regional headquarters in Singapore, remains confident of Lego’s lasting appeal

LEE U-WEN LEEUWEN@SPH.COM.SG

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JORGEN Vig Knudstorp, president and CEO of Lego, doesn’t give out business cards when he goes to a meeting. Instead, the 44-year-old reaches into his pocket and fishes out a tiny plastic Lego figurine bearing his likeness – dark-rimmed spectacles and all – with his full name, telephone number and e-mail address printed on the toy’s clothes. It’s a small but telling sign of the level of creativity that goes on behind the scenes at the Danish company famous for making those colourful interlocking plastic bricks. Read more of this post

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