Scientists Have Found The First Concrete Reason Why We Need Sleep; The brain is bathed in a special clear liquid called cerebrospinal fluid, which doesn’t mix with the blood and lymph system of the rest of the body and this fluid travels through special channels and washes the brain out of toxic waste products

Scientists Have Found The First Concrete Reason Why We Need Sleep

JENNIFER WELSH OCT. 17, 2013, 2:00 PM 30,592 26

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The buildup of toxic waste proteins causes brain cells to die in Alzheimer’s disease.

We know we need to sleep. We know our brains and bodies work better after sleep. But what we didn’t know, until now, was why. Scientists have just reported the first major mechanical reason our brains need to sleep — certain cleaning mechanisms in the brain work better when we shut the brain down. Just like how dump trucks take to the city streets during the pre-dawn hours because there’s less traffic, our brain’s cleaners also work best when there’s less going on. Read more of this post

Where there’s money, there’s risk: Events in America show that no asset is copper-bottomed

Where there’s money, there’s risk: Events in America show that no asset is copper-bottomed

Oct 19th 2013 |From the print edition

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A GOVERNMENT with debt denominated in its own currency need never default, or so the theory goes. It can simply print more money to pay off the debt. In practice, however, countries do default on local-currency debt: six have done so in the past 15 years, including Jamaica, Russia and Ecuador. Before this week’s budget deal, markets had feared that America could join the list, if only in a technical sense. Read more of this post

Asia’s Animators Draw Inspiration From Japan’s Miyazaki

Asia’s Animators Draw Inspiration From Japan’s Miyazaki

By Mathew Scott on 2:28 pm October 16, 2013.

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A scene from Hayao Miyazaki’s hit film ‘My Neighbor Totoro.’ (Photo courtesy of Studio Ghibli)

Busan. As Oscar-winning animator Hayao Miyazaki heads into retirement, industry watchers say the next generation of Asian filmmakers stepping out of his shadow will struggle to match the Japanese master’s box office domination. “The view here is that there will be no ‘second Miyazaki,’” Tokyo-based author and film critic Mark Schilling told AFP. The market for Asian animation is dominated by children’s films, Schilling said, and not the more adult-themed productions Miyazaki became famous for, such as his Oscar-winning “Spirited Away” in 2002. The 72-year-old director last month shocked the industry — and his legions of fans — by announcing he was walking away from directing. Read more of this post

Speculative art: Like all passion investments, art occupies a grey area between investment and lifestyle asset, so what role can it play in a family office’s portfolio?

SPECULATIVE ART

ARTICLE | 17 OCTOBER, 2013 11:14 AM | BY JESSICA TASMAN-JONES

This summer big brand artists continued to set records at the major auction houses. But like all passion investments, art occupies a grey area between investment and lifestyle asset, so what role can it play in a family office’s portfolio?  Read more of this post

Problems with scientific research: Scientific research has changed the world. Now it needs to change itself

Problems with scientific research: Scientific research has changed the world. Now it needs to change itself

Oct 19th 2013 |From the print edition

A SIMPLE idea underpins science: “trust, but verify”. Results should always be subject to challenge from experiment. That simple but powerful idea has generated a vast body of knowledge. Since its birth in the 17th century, modern science has changed the world beyond recognition, and overwhelmingly for the better. But success can breed complacency. Modern scientists are doing too much trusting and not enough verifying—to the detriment of the whole of science, and of humanity. Read more of this post

Bishop of bling: Episcopal extravagance fuels criticism of state-financed churches

Bishop of bling: Episcopal extravagance fuels criticism of state-financed churches

Oct 19th 2013 | BERLIN |From the print edition

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THE faithful of Limburg, a diocese in Hesse, have been protesting in front of their Romanesque cathedral, a few even affixing “95 theses” to its door to make their views of their bishop unmistakable. But the prelate, Franz-Peter Tebartz-van Elst, had already gone to Rome, where he awaits a meeting with Pope Francis that will determine his future. The extent of his excesses is such that it is hard to say which detail most rankles Germans, and not only Catholic ones. Read more of this post

Over 45 years, Darden has grown from a single restaurant in a landlocked Florida city to a 2,100-outlet empire, with its Olive Garden and Red Lobster brands blanketing the country

OCTOBER 16, 2013, 8:18 PM

An Activist Investor Is Urging Darden to Break Itself Up

By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED and ALEXANDRA STEVENSON

Over 45 years, Darden has grown from a single restaurant in a landlocked Florida city to a 2,100-outlet empire, with its Olive Garden and Red Lobster brands blanketing the country. But as the company struggles with a stagnant stock price, the activist hedge fund Barington Capital is calling for a drastic solution: breaking the company into as many as three separate businesses, according to a letter sent to its board last month that was reviewed by The New York Times. Read more of this post

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