@Cicero Would Have Loved Twitter: In many ways, Facebook and Twitter are a throwback to ancient modes of sharing news.

@Cicero Would Have Loved Twitter: In many ways, Facebook and Twitter are a throwback to ancient modes of sharing news.

L. GORDON CROVITZ

Oct. 27, 2013 5:40 p.m. ET

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‘You cannot get to the end of the Internet,” said author Tom Standage when asked what role is left for traditional news publishers. He said there is an element of “finishability” in newspapers and magazines, whether in print or online, that many people value in an era of information overload. Otherwise, Mr. Standage, a leading student of the history of technology and its portents for the future, had little good news to offer the news business during a discussion last week about his latest book. Read more of this post

How Dr. Martens boots used counter-culture to defy the punishing fashion cycle

How Dr. Martens boots used counter-culture to defy the punishing fashion cycle

By John McDuling @jmcduling 8 hours ago

European private equity house Permira—which paid $485 million to snap up the iconic British bootmaker Dr. Martens last week—isn’t the first firm with deep pockets and a global reach to try and make money out of classic shoes. But if apparel giant Nike’s resurrection of the once-bankrupt Converse label was surprising, then the Dr. Martens story is truly remarkable, mainly due to its humble boots’ long-running appeal. Read more of this post

It’s not the workload that’s making people hate their jobs—it’s the boss, according to Danish researchers

It’s not the workload that’s making people hate their jobs—it’s the boss

By Lauren Davidson @laurendavidson 9 hours ago

Overwork is one of the most common complaints of the modern professional. But it’s less likely to be a cause of workplace depression than being treated unfairly in the office is, according to new Danish research. “Our study shows that the workload actually has no effect on workplace depression,” Matias Brødsgaard Grynderup, PhD, a psychologist at Aarhus University and one of the researchers behind the study, told ScienceNordic.com. Read more of this post

The New Testament is silent about the resurrection. Nowhere do the gospels describe the central feature of Christianity

Review: ‘Silence’ by Diarmaid MacCulloch

The New Testament is silent about the resurrection. Nowhere do the gospels describe the central feature of Christianity.

D.G. HART

Oct. 27, 2013 5:42 p.m. ET

Silence wouldn’t appear to be a topic that could sustain a book. Yes, you want a quiet room for reading, but it is the presence of qualities—words or actions—that drive a book’s narrative or spin its arguments. Silence usually raises more questions than it answers. Consider the husband who is nervous about his wife’s silence or the parents who wonder why the kids in the basement are suddenly so quiet. Once the wife explains her thoughts or parents discover the kids’ activities, silence ends. Read more of this post

‘Chief disruption officer’: Standing room only as c-suite gets crowded

Leo D’Angelo Fisher Columnist

‘Chief disruption officer’: Standing room only as c-suite gets crowded

Published 25 October 2013 11:25, Updated 28 October 2013 07:32

Life insurance company TAL has created the new position of Chief Innovation and Disruption Officer. It seems there’s always room for one more “C” in the C-suite. Chief Innovation and Disruption Officer is a mouthful of a title, and CIDO doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue either. It’s certainly not as elegant and instantly recognisable as CEO or CFO. All in all, it doesn’t sound a natural fit in the once rarified C-suite. To that extent alone, the new CIDO will be living up to at least half of his job title from day one. Read more of this post

Taking count of the sufficiency of Japanese suffixes

Taking count of the sufficiency of Japanese suffixes

BY MARK SCHREIBER

SPECIAL TO THE JAPAN TIMES

OCT 27, 2013

One of the first things new learners of Japanese must struggle with is the amazing variety of classifiers for numbers. When counting books, for instance, the number is followed by 冊 (satsu, volumes, as in issatsunisatsuetc.); for thin, elongated objects such as pencils it’s 本 (hon, as in ipponnihon,sanbon, etc.); for pieces of paper like tickets it’s 枚 (mai); for à la carte orders of sushi it’s 貫 (kan); for pairs of shoes it’s 足 (soku); and so on. Read more of this post

Here are the signs that China’s Lehman moment is inevitable

Here are the signs that China’s Lehman moment is inevitable

By Gwynn Guilford @sinoceros October 27, 2013

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Money market rates in China climbed again last week, prompting more worries of a deja vu of June’s cash crunch that spooked global markets. That was when the Shibor—the Shanghai interbank offering rate, which tracks the interest rates banks charge each other—soared, reminding many of the Libor leap that happened just before Lehman’s demise in 2008. The likely cause is that the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) declined to inject funds into the interbank market for a third time in a row Friday. Cash will get even scarcer this week, when banks move cash back onto their balance sheets to meet reserve ratio requirements. For that reason, the PBOC will likely open its tills on Tuesday, soothing the Shibor once again. Read more of this post

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