Creative Intelligence: Harnessing the Power to Create, Connect, and Inspire Hardcover

Creative Intelligence: Harnessing the Power to Create, Connect, and Inspire Hardcover

by Bruce Nussbaum  (Author)

Offering insights from the spheres of anthropology, psychology, education, design, and business,Creative Intelligence by Bruce Nussbaum, a leading thinker, commentator, and curator on the subjects of design, creativity, and innovation, is first book to identify and explore creative intelligence as a new form of cultural literacy and as a powerful method for problem-solving, driving innovation, and sparking start-up capitalism. Read more of this post

Innovation–The Missing Dimension

Innovation–The Missing Dimension [Hardcover]

Richard K. Lester (Author), Michael J. Piore (Author)

Book Description

Publication Date: October 29, 2004 | ISBN-10: 0674015819 | ISBN-13: 978-0674015814 | Edition: 1

Amid mounting concern over the loss of jobs to low-wage economies, one fact is clear: America’s prosperity hinges on the ability of its businesses to continually introduce new products and services. But what makes for a creative economy? How can the remarkable surge of innovation that fueled the boom of the 1990s be sustained? Read more of this post

Die Empty: Unleash Your Best Work Every Day

Die Empty: Unleash Your Best Work Every Day Hardcover

by Todd Henry  (Author)

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“Embrace the importance of now, and refuse to allow the lull of comfort, fear, familiarity, and ego to prevent you from taking action on your ambitions…The cost of inaction is vast. Don’t go to your grave with your best work inside of you. Choose to die empty.” Read more of this post

How to Get People to Do Stuff: Master the art and science of persuasion and motivation Paperback

How to Get People to Do Stuff: Master the art and science of persuasion and motivation Paperback

by Susan Weinschenk (Author)

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We all want people to do stuff. Whether you want your customers to buy from you, vendors to give you a good deal, your employees to take more initiative, or your spouse to make dinner—a large amount of everyday is about getting the people around you to do stuff. Instead of using your usual tactics that sometimes work and sometimes don’t, what if you could harness the power of psychology and brain science to motivate people to do the stuff you want them to do – even getting people to want to do the stuff you want them to do. Read more of this post

Shaping Serendipity for Learning: Conversations with John Seely Brown

Shaping Serendipity for Learning: Conversations with John Seely Brown

July 31, 2013 12:40 AM

“Conventional wisdom holds that different people learn in different ways.  Something is missing from that idea, however, so we offer a corollary: 

Different People, 
when presented with exactly the same information in exactly the same way,
 
will learn different things. 
 
Most models of education and learning have almost no tolerance for this kind of thing.  
 
As a result, teaching tends to focus on eliminating the source of the problem: 
 
the student’s imagination.”

-John Seely Brown Read more of this post

Why John Seely Brown Says We Should Look Beyond Creativity to Cultivate Imagination

Why John Seely Brown Says We Should Look Beyond Creativity to Cultivate Imagination

By Heather Chaplin

1.8.14 | John Seely Brown is a visiting scholar and advisor to the provost at University of Southern California and independent co-chairman of the Deloitte Center for the Edge. He was chief scientist at Xerox Corporation and director of the Palo Alto Research Center. He cofounded the Institute for Research on Learning and was a trustee of the MacArthur Foundation until 2012.

This post is part of a series of conversations with thought leaders on digital media and learning, then and now. In conversation with journalist Heather Chaplin, leaders reflect on how the field of digital media and learning (DML) has changed over time, and where it’s headed.

Spotlight: Do I understand correctly that you started professional life as a bookie? Read more of this post

Why Imagination and Curiosity Matter More Than Ever

January 31, 2014, 1:04 PM ET

Why Imagination and Curiosity Matter More Than Ever

By Irving Wladawsky-Berger

Guest Contributor

A few weeks ago I read a very interesting online article: Why John Seely Brown Says We Should Look Beyond Creativity to Cultivate ImaginationJohn Seely Brown, aka JSB, was chief scientist at Xerox Corp. Ltd. and director of its Palo Alto Research Center. He is now the independent co-chairman of the Deloitte Center for the Edge and a visiting scholar at USC.  We’ve been friends for over 20 years. We both serve on the Advisory Board of USC’s Annenberg Innovation Lab. Read more of this post

Nearly Half Of America Lives Paycheck-To-Paycheck

Nearly Half Of America Lives Paycheck-To-Paycheck

Tyler Durden on 02/01/2014 14:45 -0500

While stocks are still near record highs and the inventory-stuffed picture of economic growth for the US ticks up to its fastest pace in 2 years,Time reports that a study (below) by the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED) shows nearly half of Americans are living in a state of “persistent economic insecurity,” that makes it “difficult to look beyond immediate needs and plan for a more secure future.” In other words, too many Americans are living paycheck to paycheck… but their findings get worse. Read more of this post

Market Cornered: JPMorgan Owns Over 60% Notional Of All Gold Derivatives

Market Cornered: JPMorgan Owns Over 60% Notional Of All Gold Derivatives

Tyler Durden on 02/01/2014 20:03 -0500

Perhaps the only question we have after seeing the attached table, which shows that as of Q3, 2013 JPMorgan owned $65.4 billion, or just over 60% of the total notional ($108.2 billion) of all gold derivatives in the US, is whether the CFTC will pull the “our budget was too small” excuse to justify why it allowed Jamie Dimon to ignore any and all position limits and corner the gold market? Read more of this post

Indonesia bids to woo carmakers away from Thailand

Indonesia bids to woo carmakers away from Thailand

Sunday, February 2, 2014 – 06:00

Wahyudi Soeriaatmadja

The Straits Times

Honda opened its second car manufacturing factory in Indonesia this month, and Datsun is set to follow suit in April.

Toyota is also looking at expanding production in Indonesia, officials say, as ongoing political uncertainty in Thailand sees businesses and investors look elsewhere in the region. Read more of this post

Pakistan’s privatization tsar embarks on quest to revive economy

Pakistan’s privatization tsar embarks on quest to revive economy

6:55pm EST

By Mehreen Zahra-Malik

ISLAMABAD (Reuters) – Mohammad Zubair was on a cruise dinner with Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in Thailand when he was offered the hardest job of his life: privatizing a huge chunk of the economy while fighting resistance from the opposition and trade unions. Read more of this post

Australia’s home-brewed inflation a hangover for central bank

Australia’s home-brewed inflation a hangover for central bank

2:34pm EST

By Wayne Cole

SYDNEY (Reuters) – The laudable desire of Australians to be well educated and healthy is proving an expensive one as escalating costs add to inflationary pressures even as the broader economy slows. Read more of this post

Global automakers scour India’s backroads in search of dream market

Global automakers scour India’s backroads in search of dream market

4:26pm EST

By Aradhana Aravindan

MUMBAI (Reuters) – For global automakers, the dusty backroads of rural India could be the new El Dorado.

As economic torpor suffocates demand for new cars in India’s megacities, incomes are growing faster in small towns and country areas. That’s pushing the likes of General Motors (GM.N: QuoteProfileResearchStock Buzz) and Honda Motor Co (7267.T: QuoteProfile,ResearchStock Buzz) to fan out in search of buyers in places where fewer than 20 people in every thousand own a car – for now. Read more of this post

The Human Search for Meaning: “He who has a Why to live for can bear almost any How.”- Nietzsche

The Human Search for Meaning

January 28, 2014 by Shane Parrish

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“He who has a Why to live for can bear almost any How.”— Nietzsche

Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl, is best known for his 1946 memoir Man’s Search for Meaning. The book sheds light on the horrible experiences of Auschwitz and what they taught him about life, love, and our search for meaning. When all seems hopeless, why is it that some people push forward while others subside. Read more of this post

Laws of Character and Personality: “One of the most valuable personal traits is the ability to get along with all kinds of people.”

Laws of Character and Personality

January 27, 2014 by Shane Parrish

“One of the most valuable personal traits is the ability to get along with all kinds of people.”

The Unwritten Laws of Engineering is a book for those engineers who have more obstacles of a personal nature in organizations than technical. First published as a series of three articles in Mechanical Engineering, the “laws” were written and formulated as a professional code of conduct so to speak circa 1944. Although fragmentary and incomplete, they are still used by engineers, young and old, to guide their behavior. Read more of this post

Race-religion rhetoric in Malaysia reaches new heights

Race-religion rhetoric in Malaysia reaches new heights

Sunday, February 2, 2014 – 06:00

Carolyn Hong

The Straits Times

MALAYSIA – A recent spate of vandalism targeting Christian sites has pushed the raging race-religion rhetoric to a new level, leaving Malaysians uncertain as to the direction the country is heading. Read more of this post

‘Reshoring’ is all the rage as allure of ‘Made in China’ fades

‘Reshoring’ is all the rage as allure of ‘Made in China’ fades

Sunday, Feb 02, 2014

Jeremy Au Yong

The Straits Times

Mr Craig Wolfe, 61, has been in the rubber duck business for over a decade. And for all that time, the ducks – even those designed to resemble American sports stars and presidents – were made in Shenzhen, China. Read more of this post

The Ego and the Universe: Alan Watts on Becoming Who You Really Are; The cause and cure of the illusion of separateness that keeps us from embracing the richness of life

The Ego and the Universe: Alan Watts on Becoming Who You Really Are

by Maria Popova

The cause and cure of the illusion of separateness that keeps us from embracing the richness of life.

During the 1950s and 1960s, British philosopher and writer Alan Watts began popularizing Eastern philosophy in the West, offering a wholly different perspective oninner wholeness in the age of anxiety andwhat it really means to live a life of purpose. We owe much of today’s mainstream adoption of practices like yoga and meditation to Watts’s influence. In The Book: On the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are (public library), originally published in 1966 and building upon his indispensable earlier work, Watts argues with equal parts conviction and compassion that “the prevalent sensation of oneself as a separate ego enclosed in a bag of skin is a hallucination which accords neither with Western science nor with the experimental philosophy-religions of the East,” exploring the cause and cure of that illusion in a way that flows from profound unease as we confront our cultural conditioning into a deep sense of lightness as we surrender to the comforting mystery and interconnectedness of the universe. Envisioned as a packet of essential advice a parent might hand down to his child on the brink of adulthood as initiation into the central mystery of life, this existential manual is rooted in what Watts calls “a cross-fertilization of Western science with an Eastern intuition. Read more of this post

Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives; How to fine-tune the internal monologue that scores every aspect of our lives, from leadership to love

Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives

by Maria Popova

How to fine-tune the internal monologue that scores every aspect of our lives, from leadership to love.

“If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve,” Debbie Millman counseled in one of the best commencement speeches ever given, urging: “Do what you love, and don’t stop until you get what you love. Work as hard as you can, imagine immensities…” Far from Pollyanna platitude, this advice actually reflects what modern psychology knows about how belief systems about our own abilities and potential fuel our behavior and predict our success. Much of that understanding stems from the work of Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, synthesized in her remarkably insightful Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (public library), which explores the power of our beliefs, both conscious and unconscious, and how changing even the simplest of them can have profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives. Read more of this post

Invest like a legend: Charles Brandes

Invest like a legend: Charles Brandes

BRIAN MILNER

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 30 2014, 5:44 PM EST

Brandes, 70, has been spreading the gospel of disciplined investing in sound but undervalued companies since 1974. Like Warren Buffett, the San Diego billionaire counts Ben Graham as his mentor. The author of the widely read Value Investing Today, first published in 1989, regards investing as a long-term proposition. Anything else is just speculating. Read more of this post

Relax, Being Anxious Makes You A Good Leader

RELAX, BEING ANXIOUS MAKES YOU A GOOD LEADER

A NEW BODY OF RESEARCH PAINTS ANXIOUS BEHAVIOR IN A DIFFERENT LIGHT THAN YOU’D EXPECT. BUT WHEN IT COMES TO THE WORKPLACE, IT’S A FINE LINE TO TREAD.

BY JANE PORTER

Freedom of choice is a beautiful thing, but it also breeds anxiety. What if you choose wrong? What if you screw up? Often it’s the case that there isn’t such a thing as choosing “right” or “wrong,” so much as choosing what feels best given your circumstances. That doesn’t make decision making any easier. Read more of this post

America is no less socially mobile than it was a generation ago

America is no less socially mobile than it was a generation ago

Feb 1st 2014 | WASHINGTON, DC | From the print edition

AMERICANS are deeply divided as to whether widening inequality is a problem, let alone what the government should do about it. Some are appalled that Bill Gates has so much money; others say good luck to him. But nearly everyone agrees that declining social mobility is a bad thing. Barack Obama’s state-of-the-union speech on January 28th dwelt on how America’s “ladders of opportunity” were failing (seearticle). Paul Ryan and Marco Rubio, two leading Republicans, recently gave speeches decrying social immobility and demanding more effort to ensure poor people who work hard can better their lot. Read more of this post

Microfinance: Poor service; Tiny loans are getting more expensive

Feb 1st 2014 | From the print edition 

Microfinance: Poor service; Tiny loans are getting more expensive

INTEREST on the minuscule loans made by microfinance outfits has always been high, but over the past few years it has become even higher. A recent paper, using data on over 1,500 microfinance institutions (MFIs) from around the world, shows that for the smallest loans, typically less than $150, the average rate climbed steadily from 30% in 2004 to 35% in 2011.* Read more of this post

Emerging markets: Locus of extremity; Developing economies struggle to cope with a new world

Emerging markets: Locus of extremity; Developing economies struggle to cope with a new world

Feb 1st 2014 | HONG KONG | From the print edition

THE central bank of Turkey boasts an impressive art collection, including a canvas by Erol Akyavas entitled “Locus of Extremity”. That was pretty much where the central bank found itself at midnight on January 28th. Turkey’s currency, the lira, had fallen by 13% against the dollar in the previous six weeks, one of the worst casualties of a broader sell-off in emerging-market assets. Prices were rising (by 7.4% in the year to December) and yet the political pressure to suppress interest rates remained firm. At its unscheduled, nocturnal meeting, the central bank dramatically simplified and tightened monetary policy, raising what will henceforth be its key rate from 4.5% to 10%. Read more of this post

Despite their immense wealth, the Saudis are not happy

Despite their immense wealth, the Saudis are not happy

Feb 1st 2014 | RIYADH | From the print edition

MONEY can buy many things: luxury, influence, security—and even time. How frustrating, then, to be vastly rich but never quite to get what you want. Such is the dilemma faced by the world’s richest family, the Al Sauds of Saudi Arabia. Read more of this post

Making High-Speed Trains Work in the U.S. High-speed rail could work in the U.S., but planners need to follow some simple rules

Making High-Speed Trains Work in the U.S.

High-speed rail could work in the U.S., but planners need to follow some simple rules

TOM ZOELLNER

Jan. 31, 2014 9:40 p.m. ET

High-speed trains have always been a tough sell in the U.S. The technology is as old as Sputnik, but Congress and the states chose to keep the focus on interstate highways in the late 20th century. American critics still complain that bullet trains are too expensive, too underutilized and potentially unsafe. Read more of this post

A Height Gene? One for Smarts? Don’t Bet On It; Any given gene is likely to be unimportant, large-scale studies have found

A Height Gene? One for Smarts? Don’t Bet On It

Jan. 31, 2014 9:19 p.m. ET

As I skimmed my emails one morning—mostly Viagra ads and news of the three lotteries that I had won during the night—one stopped me in my tracks. “Is overeating in your genes? Take an online test.” I was curious—not about whether my genes prompted me to pig out, but about how the company’s test was supposed to determine that. Read more of this post

‘Frontier Markets’ Rope In Investors; Off-the-Beaten-Path Arenas Attract Fund Managers Hoping to Ride Their Years of Rapid Growth

‘Frontier Markets’ Rope In Investors

Off-the-Beaten-Path Arenas Attract Fund Managers Hoping to Ride Their Years of Rapid Growth

DAN KEELER

Updated Jan. 31, 2014 8:35 p.m. ET

Some investors are finding refuge from the recent emerging-markets turbulence in an unexpected place: even less-developed economies.

These “frontier markets” are luring money managers who are willing to delve into smaller markets with more difficult trading conditions in order to gain exposure to robust economic growth.

Because they are off the beaten path, frontier markets haven’t been swept up in the selloff that has pummeled emerging markets. Countries such as Nigeria, Pakistan and Bangladesh didn’t see much of the cash that poured into emerging markets after the financial crisis, when low-interest-rate policies in richer economies sent investors in search of better returns in the developing world.

Instead, frontier markets have seen a steady trickle of investment from fund managers hoping to ride years of rapid growth. As a result, these economies have come through relatively unscathed even as investors pull out of larger emerging markets such as Turkey and South Africa.

The MSCI Frontier Market Index is up 1.3% so far this year, compared with a 6.6% decline in the MSCI Emerging Market Index. Last year, frontier markets rose 16%, while emerging markets fell 12%.

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Funds that buy frontier stocks in January drew in $244 million through Jan. 29, the most since October, according to EPFR Global. Over the same period, investors yanked $11.6 billion from emerging-market funds. Read more of this post

Escape from the Chronic Pain Trap: More than 100 million American adults live with chronic pain-most of them women. What will it take to bring them relief?

Escape from the Chronic Pain Trap

More than 100 million American adults live with chronic pain—most of them women. What will it take to bring them relief?

In a conversation with Gary Rosen, Judy Foreman, author of “A Nation in Pain,” discusses America’s chronic pain epidemic and why women suffer disproportionately.

JUDY FOREMAN

Jan. 31, 2014 9:09 p.m. ET

Several years ago, my neck suddenly went bonkers—bone spurs and a long-lurking arthritic problem probably exacerbated by too many hours spent hunching over a new laptop. On a subjective scale of zero to 10 (unfortunately, there is no simple objective test for pain), even the slightest wrong move—turning my head too fast or picking up a pen from the floor—would send my pain zooming from a zero to a gasping 10. Read more of this post

Investors Look Toward Safer Options as Ground Shifts

Investors Look Toward Safer Options as Ground Shifts

TOM LAURICELLA , KATIE MARTIN and TOMMY STUBBINGTON

Updated Jan. 29, 2014 10:37 p.m. ET

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Just one month into 2014, investors from Illinois to Istanbul are finding the tide going out fast for stocks and other riskier investments. Read more of this post

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