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‘Flappy Bird’ Creator Dong Nguyen Says He’s Shutting The Game Down, Putting Us All Out Of Our Misery; The app is generating $50,000 in sales per day.

‘Flappy Bird’ Creator Says He’s Shutting The Game Down, Putting Us All Out Of Our Misery

NICHOLAS CARLSON

FEB. 8, 2014, 2:59 PM 33,718 3

Suddenly popular, super hard, super addictive smartphone game Flappy Bird is going away. Read more of this post

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Two Stanford Professors Have A Fascinating Theory Of Why Businesses Succeed; “Is it more like Catholicism, where the aim is to replicate preordained design beliefs and practices? Or is it more like Buddhism, where an underlying mindset guides why

Two Stanford Professors Have A Fascinating Theory Of Why Businesses Succeed

ALISON GRISWOLD

FEB. 4, 2014, 10:57 AM 22,462 15

In September 2012, Home Depot was in trouble.

The construction and home improvement giant had just announced it would shutter seven big-box outlets in China — the last of the 12 stores it had acquired six years earlier. The company would take an after-tax charge of $160 million and 850 people would lose their jobs. Read more of this post

How Dangerous Is China’s Credit Bubble for the World?

How Dangerous Is China’s Credit Bubble for the World?

Tyler Durden on 02/08/2014 18:33 -0500

Submitted by Pater Tenebrarum of Acting-Man blog,

Global Meltdown Predicted by Charlene Chu

Following on the heels of a report that appeared in the Telegraph on the topic, William Pesek at Bloomberg has recently also written an article about Charlene Chu (formerly with Fitch, nowadays with private firm Autonomous Research) and her opinions on China’s shadow banking system and the dangers it represents. The article is ominously entitled “China, the Death Star of Emerging Markets”.  Read more of this post

Investors Still Chasing Low Quality, But Graham Value In US, Japan

Investors Still Chasing Low Quality, But Graham Value In US, Japan

by Saul GriffithFebruary 07, 2014, 3:15 pm

The January sell-off exposed the fact that investors were still pushing money into low quality stocks compared to quality names.

“Despite the very weak market performance in the latter part of January, it was still the low quality names that showed the best returns overall last month, whilst managing positive absolute performance in many regions,” says a research report from SocGen analysts Andrew Lapthorne, Rui Antunes, John Carson, Georgios Oikonomou, Michael Suen and Josh Cherian. “Low quality did underperform during the market decline, as you would expect, but the extent of the “risk-off trade” was not enough to offset the strong outperformance of low quality earlier in the month.” Read more of this post

The name game: New web domain names hit the market

The name game: New web domain names hit the market

Feb 8th 2014 | From the print edition

AFTER the dotcom boom of the 1990s, the world is about to experience a boom in dots. Over 1,000 new generic top-level domain names (gTLDs) are set to join the 22 existing ones, such as .com and .org, and the 280 country-specific ones, such as .uk, that now grace the end of web addresses. The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the non-profit organisation that manages the web’s address book, reckons this will boost competition and innovation. It will also increase the cost to businesses of protecting their brands.

Some of the new gTLDs, such as .guru and .sexy, will flatter owners’ egos. Others, such as .clothing and .photography, will be used by firms to tout their wares. Among the first to go live, on February 4th, was “.web” written in Arabic script. That made history: until now all generic top-level domains have been written in Latin lettering, meaning internet users with Arabic keyboards had to wrestle with ALT, CTRL and the like to type the last few letters of most websites’ names. Other gTLDs in scripts such as Chinese and Russian will follow in the coming months.

Firms including Apple, Ford and IWC, a watchmaker, have already applied to register their names as gTLDs. That will allow them to ensure they are not used by crooks or cybersquatters. Google, Amazon and others have applied for numerous gTLDs, including .app and .kindle, presumably because they want to use them and think they can make money by selling the right to use “second-level” domains (for example, economist.app), typically for $10-50 a year. Firms may also be keen to buy certain second-level domains to stop them falling into the wrong hands. Donuts, a company that has lodged hundreds of applications for gTLDs, has .wtf and .sucks on its list.

But there are costs to owning a gTLD. Firms must pay $185,000 to ICANN when applying for one, plus $25,000 for each year they use it. Deciding which ones to splash out on is tricky. New domains including .biz and .mobi have been added in the past, but have failed to put a dent in the wildly popular .com (see chart).

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The avalanche of new domains may also confuse web users, who often get to their destinations via search engines rather than by typing web addresses into browsers. Greater choice and competition should eventually bring them benefits. But the transition may be .complicated.

 

Government-to-government trade: Unbundling the nation state; Countries have started to outsource public services to each other

Government-to-government trade: Unbundling the nation state; Countries have started to outsource public services to each other

Feb 8th 2014 | From the print edition

NIGERIAN pineapple for breakfast, Peruvian quinoa for lunch and Japanese sushi for dinner. Two centuries ago, when David Ricardo advocated specialisation and free trade, the notion that international exchange in goods and services could make such a cosmopolitan diet commonplace would have seemed fanciful. Read more of this post

If Brazilians find themselves in a tight spot, they say they are in a saia justa (a tight skirt); Brazil’s president has left herself little room for economic manoeuvre ahead of a difficult re-election campaign

Brazil’s president has left herself little room for economic manoeuvre ahead of a difficult re-election campaign

Feb 8th 2014 | From the print edition

IF BRAZILIANS find themselves in a tight spot, they say they are in a saia justa (a tight skirt). Although she usually prefers trouser suits, that is precisely where Dilma Rousseff finds herself. Later this month she will launch her campaign to win a second term in a presidential election due on October 5th. Normally at this stage of the political cycle, as in the run-up to elections in 2006 and 2010, the government would be ramping up spending. But when Ms Rousseff spoke to the World Economic Forum in Davos last month, with the São Paulo stockmarket and the real dipping along with other emerging economies, she felt impelled to stress her commitment to being strait-laced. Read more of this post

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