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How my Year of TED was a lot like the Wizard of Oz: A Q&A with Kylie Dunn

How my Year of TED was a lot like the Wizard of Oz: A Q&A with Kylie Dunn

Posted by: Kate Torgovnick May
January 29, 2014 at 2:43 pm EST

image001-14 help of the scarecrow, tin man and lion. Illustration: Matthew Dunn

Kylie Dunn has come up with the perfect analogy for her Year of TED, a self-improvement project she dreamed up in 2011 to infuse ideas from TED Talks into her everyday life. She says that the experience was akin to the Wizard of Oz, with herself playing each of the main characters. Read more of this post

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The future of the $100 billion parking industry

The future of the $100 billion parking industry

BY AASHISH DALAL 
ON JANUARY 30, 2014

The 2014 Consumer Electronics Show featured the auto-industry like no other CES before it. From self-driving vehicles to digital interiors, the promise of a “connected car” is surely getting closer. Largely missing from the announcements, however, was how parking is being improved for drivers. Innovative parking models have been written about for years, but those models have never fully materialized. Read more of this post

The Pension Heist: How politicians raid retirement funds to enrich their corporate masters

The Pension Heist: How politicians raid retirement funds to enrich their corporate masters

BY DAVID SIROTA 
ON JANUARY 30, 2014

Let’s say that as a condition of your employment, your company agreed to pay you a set retirement benefit from its retirement fund, with the implied understanding that the company would make the necessary annual contributions to keep that fund solvent. How would you feel when you later discovered your employer wasn’t actually making those annual contributions? Instead there is a severe cash shortfall. More specifically, how would you feel if your employer cited that shortfall – the one it created – as justification to slash your retirement benefits — the ones you were originally promised? Read more of this post

Beyond the check-in: Foursquare’s future of location-based commerce is closer than you think

Beyond the check-in: Foursquare’s future of location-based commerce is closer than you think

BY MICHAEL CARNEY 
ON JANUARY 30, 2014

The Foursquare of today couldn’t be further from product that debuted to users in March 2009. Gone is the emphasis on checkins, mayorships, and other gamification tactics aimed at getting users to share their location. What’s emerged is a platform geared toward exploration and discovery of the physical world around us. It’s a problem that Dennis Crowley has been trying to solve since 2005 when he founded Dodgeball – which was later acquired and sunsetted by Google – he just needed technology, small businesses, and consumers to catch up with his vision. Read more of this post

Five tips for entrepreneurs from Flight Centre founder and rich lister Geoff Harris: Cultivate personal resilience; Design your organisational structure for humans

Caitlin Fitzsimmons Online editor

Five tips for entrepreneurs from Flight Centre founder and rich lister Geoff Harris

Published 24 January 2014 11:41, Updated 27 January 2014 12:22

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Flight Centre founder Geoff Harris recently stepped down as vice-president of the Hawthorn AFL club after three years. Mal Fairclough

As founder of Flight Centre, Geoff Harris made a fortune valued at $800 million on the 2013 BRW Rich 200. He was also an early investor in Janine Allis’s Boost Juice and still holds a small stake in parent company Retail Zoo that will be divested if the sale to Affinity Equity goes ahead. Harris is also an investor and director of Top Deck Travel in the UK. Read more of this post

Entrepreneur behind K5 surveillance robot faces down critics

Entrepreneur behind K5 surveillance robot faces down critics

Published 27 January 2014 16:08, Updated 29 January 2014 09:29

USA Today

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The K5 robot is presented as a potential police aid. Its built-in laser sweeps 270 degrees to photographically map the area it is monitoring in 3D.

A visitor to Knightscope, a seven-person robotics start-up with a bold and controversial vision for crime fighting, is as likely to be greeted by a robot as he is a human. Read more of this post

Too many office managers, too few computer scientists: Freelancer’s Matt Barrie pinpoints our start-ups’ problems

Michael Bailey Deputy editor

Too many office managers, too few computer scientists: Freelancer’s Matt Barrie pinpoints our start-ups’ problems

Published 28 January 2014 10:34, Updated 29 January 2014 09:29

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Matt Barrie: searching hard for computer science graduates Louis Douvis

Australia’s relatively low number of graduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, as well as its habit of shunning failed entrepreneurs, are two factors harming our start-up ecosystem according to Freelancer.com founder Matt Barrie. Read more of this post

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