Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life; much of the quality of your life depends not on fame or fortune, beauty or brains, fate or coincidence, but on what you choose to pay attention to

Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life Paperback

by Winifred Gallagher  (Author)

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Acclaimed behavioral science writer Winifred Gallagher’s Rapt makes the radical argument that much of the quality of your life depends not on fame or fortune, beauty or brains, fate or coincidence, but on what you choose to pay attention to. Rapt introduces a diverse cast of characters, from researchers to artists to ranchers, to illustrate the art of living the interested life. As their stories show, by focusing on the most positive and productive elements of any situation, you can shape your inner experience and expand your world. By learning to focus, you can improve your concentration, broaden your inner horizons, and most important, feel what it means to be fully alive.Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Amazon Exclusive: Winifred Gallagher on Rapt

A wise research psychiatrist once told me that he had identified life’s greatest problem: How to balance self and others, or your need for independence with your need for relationship? Since writing Rapt, I’ve come to believe that we now face a fundamental psychological challenge of a different sort: How to balance your need to know—for the first time in history, fed by a bottomless spring of electronic information, from e-mail to Wikipedia–with your need to be? To think your thoughts, enjoy your companions, and do your work (to say nothing of staring into a fire or gazing dreamily at the sky) without interruption from beeps, vibrations, and flashing lights? Or perhaps worse, from the nagging sense that when you’re off the grid, you’re somehow missing out?

Science’s new understanding of attention can help shape your answers to this question, which pops up all day long in various forms. When you sit at your computer, will you focus on writing that report or aimless web browsing? At the meeting, will you attend to the speaker or to your BlackBerry? Research suggests that your choices are more consequential than you may suspect. When you zero in on a sight or sound, thought or feeling, your brain spotlights and depicts that “target,” which then becomes part of the subjective mental construct that you nonetheless confidently call “reality” or “the world.” In contrast, things that you ignore don’t, at least with anything like the same clarity. As William James succinctly puts it, “My experience is what I agree to attend to.”

The realization that your life—indeed, yourself–largely consists of the physical objects and mental subjects that you’ve focused on, from e-bay bargains to world peace, becomes even more sobering when you consider that, as the expression “pay attention” suggests, like your money, your concentration is a finite resource. How can you get the highest experiential return for this cognitive capital? By focusing on some screen or on playing your guitar? On IM-ing your old friend or joining her for a walk?

Considering the Internet’s countless temptations and distractions, deciding how best to invest your time and attention when you’re online is particularly challenging. Left to its own devices, your involuntary, “bottom-up” attention system asks, “What’s the most obvious, compelling thing to zero in on here? That e-mail prompt? This colorful ad?” Fortunately, evolution has also equipped you with a voluntary, “top-down” attention system that poses a different question: “What do you want to focus on right now? Ordering that new novel, then checking the weather report, then getting back to work, right?” Sometimes, it’s fun to just wander around online, allowing your mind to be captured by random, bottom-up distractions. In general, however, it’s far more productive to focus on top-down targets you’ve selected to create the kind of experience you want to invite.

Along with making clear choices about what things merit your precious attention online, there are some other simple ways to protect the quality of your daily life from technological interference. Remember that your electronics are your servants, not your masters, and don’t let them choose your focus for you. Abandon vain attempts to “multitask,” because when you try to attend to two things at once—phoning while checking e-mail—you’re simply switching rapidly between them, which takes longer and generates more errors. When you need to concentrate on an important activity, try to work for 90 minutes without interruptions, because rebooting your brain can take up to 20 minutes.

Most important, as you go about the day, bear in mind that by taking charge of your attention, you improve your experience, increase your concentration, and lift your spirits. Best of all, enjoying the rapt state of being completely absorbed, whether by a website or a sunset, a project or a person, simply makes life worth living. We cannot always be happy, but we can almost always be focused, which is as close as we can get.

–This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Gallagher (The Power of Place, Working on God) couples personal ruminations and interviews with experts to explore the role of attention in defining consciousness, identity and the human experience: “who you are, what you think, feel, and do, what you love-is the sum of what you focus on.” From paying attention to your inner dialogue (helping eliminate negative thought patterns) to bucking the myths of multi-tasking (says cognitive scientist David Meyer, “Einstein didn’t invent the theory of relativity while multi-tasking at the Swiss patent office”), Gallagher draws practical conclusions from her examination of conscious (“top-down”) and unconscious (“bottom-up”) attention strategies. Though her claims to “a psychological version of… physicist’s ‘grand universal theory'” are a bit outsized, Gallagher takes illuminating forays into the evolution of the species and the global diaspora, looking for instance at how “Western individualism” emphasizes top-down focus while the Asian mentality encourages a broader, contextual perspective. A fascinating psycho-social look at human motivation and the power of focus, Gallagher’s latest is worth paying attention to.

About bambooinnovator
Kee Koon Boon (“KB”) is the co-founder and director of HERO Investment Management which provides specialized fund management and investment advisory services to the ARCHEA Asia HERO Innovators Fund (www.heroinnovator.com), the only Asian SMID-cap tech-focused fund in the industry. KB is an internationally featured investor rooted in the principles of value investing for over a decade as a fund manager and analyst in the Asian capital markets who started his career at a boutique hedge fund in Singapore where he was with the firm since 2002 and was also part of the core investment committee in significantly outperforming the index in the 10-year-plus-old flagship Asian fund. He was also the portfolio manager for Asia-Pacific equities at Korea’s largest mutual fund company. Prior to setting up the H.E.R.O. Innovators Fund, KB was the Chief Investment Officer & CEO of a Singapore Registered Fund Management Company (RFMC) where he is responsible for listed Asian equity investments. KB had taught accounting at the Singapore Management University (SMU) as a faculty member and also pioneered the 15-week course on Accounting Fraud in Asia as an official module at SMU. KB remains grateful and honored to be invited by Singapore’s financial regulator Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) to present to their top management team about implementing a world’s first fact-based forward-looking fraud detection framework to bring about benefits for the capital markets in Singapore and for the public and investment community. KB also served the community in sharing his insights in writing articles about value investing and corporate governance in the media that include Business Times, Straits Times, Jakarta Post, Manual of Ideas, Investopedia, TedXWallStreet. He had also presented in top investment, banking and finance conferences in America, Italy, Sydney, Cape Town, HK, China. He has trained CEOs, entrepreneurs, CFOs, management executives in business strategy & business model innovation in Singapore, HK and China.

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