High Tech’s Secret Weapon: The Whiteboard; Fast, Big and Easy to Use, These Dry-Erase Boards Are a True Innovation Tool

High Tech’s Secret Weapon: The Whiteboard

Fast, Big and Easy to Use, These Dry-Erase Boards Are a True Innovation Tool

FARHAD MANJOO

Oct. 30, 2013 5:52 p.m. ET

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The headquarters of the popular note-taking app Evernote are typical of many Silicon Valley firms. There’s a cafeteria brimming with free food, vending machines offering up free tech supplies, and conference rooms bearing morale-boosting wacky names. (Evernote’s theme is videogames: You might have a meeting in Ace Combat, Elder Scrolls, or Dig Dug.) And then there are the whiteboards—or, more accurately, the whitewalls. When the company moved last year into the Redwood City, Calif., building, it painted almost every surface with IdeaPaint, a substance that makes walls amenable to dry-erase markers. Read more of this post

China Companies Line Up for U.S. IPOs

China Companies Line Up for U.S. IPOs

Debut of 58.com Thursday Will Show Market’s Appetite

PAUL MOZUR in Beijing, DANIEL INMAN in Hong Kong and TELIS DEMOS in New York

Oct. 30, 2013 3:45 p.m. ET

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When China’s equivalent of Craigslist sells shares in New York on Thursday, it will offer the best indicator yet of whether U.S. investors have found a taste for Chinese stocks again after a two-year case of indigestion. 58.com Inc. is set to list on the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday, the first in a string of Chinese Internet companies looking to debut in the U.S. in coming months. A strong reception for 58.com would indicate that investors have become more comfortable with Chinese shares after alleged accounting fraud at a handful of companies hammered some of these stocks two years ago and led to a broad retreat by U.S. investors. Read more of this post

In the Global Movie Business, China Aims for a Starring Role

In the Global Movie Business, China Aims for a Starring Role

Oct 29, 2013 Strategic Management Asia-Pacific China

“Chinese Titan Takes Aim at Hollywood,” said a New York Times report last month, referring to the plans of Wang Jianlin, China’s wealthiest investor and founder of the $30 billion real estate group Dalian Wanda, to build a movie-themed real estate project in the upscale seaside town of Qingdao. Price tag: 50 billion Yuan ($8 billion). “It is estimated that China’s film box office revenue will surpass North America’s by 2018 and will double it by 2023 — that is why I believe the future of the world’s film industry is in China,” the Times quoted Wang as saying. Read more of this post

A decade after SARS swept through the world and killed more than 750 people, scientists have made a troubling discovery: A very close cousin of the SARS virus lives in bats and it can likely jump directly to people

Study: Bat-to-Human Leap Likely for SARS-Like Virus

GAUTAM NAIK

Updated Oct. 30, 2013 7:07 p.m. ET

A decade after SARS swept through the world and killed more than 750 people, scientists have made a troubling discovery: A very close cousin of the SARS virus lives in bats and it can likely jump directly to people. The findings create new fears about the emergence of diseases like SARS, or severe acute respiratory syndrome. The virus spread quickly from person to person in 2003 and had a mortality rate of at least 9%. Worries of a severe pandemic led the World Health Organization to issue an emergency travel advisory. Read more of this post

Research for AIDS Cure Advances as HIV Fought in Monkeys

Research for AIDS Cure Advances as HIV Fought in Monkeys

Antibodies derived from the blood of HIV-infected people suppressed the virus in the blood of monkeys in two studies that suggest the experimental approach may improve AIDS therapy or point the way toward a cure. One study showed that a single injection of antibodies reduced the simian, or monkey, version of HIV to undetectable levels in three to seven days — much faster than regular AIDS drugs — and the effect lasted for almost two months. The research, led by Dan Barouch, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, is published today online by the journal Nature. Read more of this post

Teva, the world’s largest generic-drug maker, have plunged 42% since their 2010 peak. Now the man hired to turn the company around just 18 months ago is gone, and analysts say it may be tough to find a replacement

Teva Seen Struggling in CEO Search as Board Under Fire

The shares of Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (TEVA), the world’s largest generic-drug maker, have plunged 42 percent since their 2010 peak. Now the man hired to turn the company around just 18 months ago is gone, and analysts say it may be tough to find a replacement. Jeremy Levin, a former Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. executive, joined Israel-based Teva as chief executive officer with a reputation as one of the industry’s top dealmakers. A rift over the company’s future with Phillip Frost, the U.S. billionaire who is board chairman and Teva’s biggest individual shareholder, led to Levin’s ouster, opening questions about the ability of a high-powered replacement to manage Teva going forward. Read more of this post

Peter Zaldivar’s Hotel Shilla Pitch at Invest For Kids Chicago

Peter Zaldivar’s Hotel Shilla Pitch at Invest For Kids Chicago

Posted: 29 Oct 2013 11:24 PM PDT

Peter Zaldivar’s Presentation at Invest For Kids Chicago

•    International focus; looks for smaller underloved companies
•    Hotel Shilla (008770) 
•    $2.4 billion market cap
•    2 hotels in Korea (10% of sales) and duty free shops (90% of sales)
•    6 locations generate $6 billion of sales
•    Duopoly – 35% versus 50% Lotte (private)
•    Fast growth of 15% and accelerating
•    Barriers to entry are scale and government licenses
•    Chinese are getting richer – number of rich Chinese are growing substantially
•    Korea wants tourism and China is only 90 min away
•    Cosmetic surgery – world center for plastic surgery
•    Most important thing is that they sell luxury brands for less (as in 40% less than in mainland China)
•    South Korea has a tourist police force that verify authenticity
•    Chinese half of customer base and growing at 30% per year
•    More Chinese are getting passports – still less than 10%
•    Yet Hotel Shilla is trading at 17.2x 2014E earnings
•    28% upside in a base case
•    69% upside implied by a slight premium to comps
•    Same P/E as European counterparts would imply a 60% gain

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