Dale Carnegie: How to succeed; Folksy tips from the father of self-help in America

Dale Carnegie: How to succeed; Folksy tips from the father of self-help in America

Nov 2nd 2013 |From the print edition

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Self-Help Messiah: Dale Carnegie and Success in Modern America. By Steven Watts. Other Press; 582 pages; $29.95 and £21.99. Buy from Amazon.com,Amazon.co.uk

RUNNING US Steel at the turn of the 20th century, Charles Schwab was perhaps the first person in America to earn a salary of $1m a year. What made him so successful? Was he a genius? No. Did he know more about steel than other people? Certainly not. So how did he get ahead? Schwab knew how “to make people like him,” observed Dale Carnegie. With charm, confidence and a good smile, anyone can climb the ladder of success. Read more of this post

A Dozen Things I’ve Learned from Philip Fisher and Walter Schloss About Investing

A Dozen Things I’ve Learned from Philip Fisher and Walter Schloss About Investing

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1. “I had made what I believe was one of the more valuable decisions of my business life. This was to confine all efforts solely to making major gains in the long-run…. There are two fundamental approaches to  investment.  There’s the approach Ben Graham pioneered, which is to find  something intrinsically so cheap that there is little chance of it having a big  decline. He’s got financial safeguards to that. It isn’t going to go down much,  and sooner or later value will come into it.  Then there is my approach, which is to find  something so good–if you don’t pay too much for it–that it will have very,  very large growth. The advantage is that a bigger percentage of my stocks is apt  to perform in a smaller period of time–although it has taken several years for  some of these to even start, and you’re bound to make some mistakes at it. [But]  when a stock is really unusual, it makes the bulk of its moves in a relatively  short period of time.”  Phil Fisher understood (1) trying to predict the direction  of a market or stock in the short-term is not a game where one can have an advantage versus the house (especially after fees); and (2) his approach was different from Ben Graham. Read more of this post

Mahindra & Mahindra: SUVival of the fittest; Mahindra has become the pin-up of Indian capitalism—a home-grown automotive champion. Now it must resist complacency and be prepared to take bigger risks

Mahindra & Mahindra: SUVival of the fittest; Mahindra has become the pin-up of Indian capitalism—a home-grown automotive champion. Now it must resist complacency and be prepared to take bigger risks

Nov 2nd 2013 | MUMBAI |From the print edition

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INSIDE Anand Mahindra, an Indian tycoon, there is a rebel bursting to get out. He works amid aircraft models and walls of framed posters and has a mildly indiscreet Twitter account with a million followers. A former film student at Harvard, he describes his country’s malaise using the metaphor of “Star Wars”. Graft and cronyism in India are like an evil Empire that has struck back. His hope is that middle-class and young Indians become Jedi knights to battle the Dark Side. Read more of this post

6 Famous People Who Have Received Brutal Rejection Letters

6 Famous People Who Have Received Brutal Rejection Letters

VIVIAN GIANG OCT. 31, 2013, 10:34 PM 3,723 2

What’s the most difficult thing every successful person has to deal with? Rejection. Recent Nobel Prize winner Alice Munro made headlines when an archive of her rejection letters were found through the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. One letter, written by Knopf editor Judith Jones in 1968 in response to Munro’s book “Dance of the Happy Shades,” says there is “nothing particularly new and exciting” about the short stories and calls Munro “not that young.” Today, Munro is the first Canadian and 13th woman to win the Nobel Prize in literature. She isn’t the only successful person to receive heart-wrenching rejection letters. C.S. Lewis received 800 rejections before he sold his first piece of writing, and Mary Higgins Clark spent six years trying to get her first novel published, which she sold for $100. Forty years after that first novel, Clark accepted a $64 million book deal with Simon Schuster in the 1990s. Below are six rejection letters that now-famous people once received: Read more of this post

Comvita CEO Brett Hewlett shares his thoughts on role models, the impact of leadership on internationalisation, and whether leadership can be displayed across all levels of an organisation

AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP

Brett Hewlett, winner of the ‘KPMG Outstanding International Business Leader’ category at the 2013 New Zealand International Business Awards, shares his thoughts on role models, the impact of leadership on internationalisation, and whether leadership can be displayed across all levels of an organisation.

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Who is your top leadership role model?

Richard Branson is always top of mind for me as I find inspiration in his huge vision, but I can also identify with his rebellious, playful and passionate approach to business and life. In general terms I draw most inspiration from amazing acts of leadership from a vast array of people in everyday life, more so than having a following for a single role model – no one is perfect.

What are the top five character traits of a great leader?

Vision, passion, empathy, compassion, generosity – oh, and a good sense of humour helps. Credibility and effectiveness is what sustains great leadership. Over time you will be judged more on what you have done and less on what you have said.

How important is leadership when it comes to helping a company grow into new markets?

Doing anything ‘new’ involves elements of change and risk for an organisation. Not everyone will see it as exciting. It is also possible to be swept away by the pioneering enthusiasm of doing something new just for the sake of it. This is where empathy comes in. A good leader will attempt to understand all of the issues in a balanced way, have empathy for people’s concerns and build consensus and support for the decision. Read more of this post

14 Famous Business Books Summarized In One Sentence Each

14 Famous Business Books Summarized In One Sentence Each

MAX NISEN OCT. 31, 2013, 4:08 PM 24,821 9

Want to read 14 famous business books in under a minute? To save you some time and money, we’ve made it possible. We boiled down some of the most popular and influential business books out there to their central lessons. For those looking to bone up on some business theory, here are the highlights.

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Deepavali is held to celebrate the death of evil at the hands of good, of darkness being vanquished by light. A time to celebrate, a time to ponder

Updated: Friday November 1, 2013 MYT 7:41:21 AM

A time to celebrate, a time to ponder

BY DORAIRAJ NADASON

Deepavali is held to celebrate the death of evil at the hands of good, of darkness being vanquished by light. But every so often, death is cruel and there is little to celebrate.

IT’S Deepavali, a time to celebrate. It’s also All-Souls Day, when Christians (the Catholics, the Protestants don’t bother) gather to remember the dead. In a sense, Deepavali is also a time to remember the dead. It’s said to be the day when Lord Krishna slew the evil demon Narakasura. And it was the dying Narakasura who begged a boon from the God that all in the land should celebrate his death, so there would be no evil on earth again. Read more of this post

Why a strategy is not a plan: Strategies too often fail because more is expected of them than they can deliver

Why a strategy is not a plan: Strategies too often fail because more is expected of them than they can deliver

Nov 2nd 2013 |From the print edition

Strategy: A History. By Lawrence Freedman. Oxford University Press USA; 751 pages; $34.95. Buy from Amazon.com

EVERYONE, it seems, is in need of a strategy. Governments have lots of them: strategies for health care, energy, housing, and so on. Each area of policy is made to seem more purposeful if there is a strategy behind it. Similarly, no company these days would dare to admit it lacks one. If things are going badly it will often be put down to the lack of good strategy. People even talk about using it to improve their lives—from coping with stress to losing weight or just making other people like them more. Read more of this post

Rocky royalty: An expert says that the Gulf monarchs have had it. A premature judgment? After the Sheikhs: The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies

Rocky royalty: An expert says that the Gulf monarchs have had it. A premature judgment?

Nov 2nd 2013 |From the print edition

After the Sheikhs: The Coming Collapse of the Gulf Monarchies. By Christopher Davidson. Oxford University Press; 304 pages; $34.95. Hurst; £29.99.Buy from Amazon.comAmazon.co.uk

IT IS bad luck that “After the Sheikhs”, which came out in Britain last year and is only now being published in America, went to press before the forces of revolution in the Arab world suffered their recent string of reverses. In 2012 the Muslim Brothers in Egypt, the most populous and pivotal of the countries in the region, were riding high. The Syrian opposition seemed to be winning. And the wind of change had begun to buffet the rulers of the Gulf, the butt of this book. Christopher Davidson’s message, implicit in the title, is that their number is up. It is just a matter of when rather than if they fall. “Most of these regimes—at least in their present form—will be gone within the next two to five years.” This is a bold proposition, to put it mildly. In the past few months the forces of reaction have been fighting back.

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Fixing Sweden’s schools: Swedish pupils have fallen behind their international peers

Fixing Sweden’s schools: Swedish pupils have fallen behind their international peers

Nov 2nd 2013 | STOCKHOLM |From the print edition

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A NEW study from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) will land on the desks of policymakers around the world next month. It will make sobering reading for political leaders in many countries. In Sweden Jan Bjorklund, the education minister, is prepared for poor marks too. The triennial study by the OECD, a think-tank, measures the reading, maths and science proficiency of 15-year-olds. In the first study, in 2000, Swedish pupils performed a lot better than those in most other countries. But even as the country’s schools inspired imitators elsewhere, their results have deteriorated. In 2009 Sweden’s overall score fell below the OECD average. Other rankings show a similar trend. Read more of this post

Butterfly ball: How species separate is still mysterious. Lepidoptera make things clearer

Butterfly ball: How species separate is still mysterious. Lepidoptera make things clearer

Nov 2nd 2013 |From the print edition

Pinning down the truth

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BIOLOGISTS love Heliconius. In the 19th century, the mimicry by edible butterflies and moths of the brash warning colours sported by members of this genus (Heliconius butterflies themselves are usually toxic) was one of the first-noted and best examples of natural selection at work. And the genus is still doing duty in evolutionary biologists’ laboratories. Marcus Kronforst of the University of Chicago, for example, is using it to understand how speciation happens. Read more of this post

Dark matter: Absence of evidence, or evidence of absence? Physicists are learning more about what dark matter isn’t. That will help them find out what it is

Dark matter: Absence of evidence, or evidence of absence? Physicists are learning more about what dark matter isn’t. That will help them find out what it is

Nov 2nd 2013 |From the print edition

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COSMOLOGY and particle physics—or at least, the popular versions of them—tend to the grandiose. The Higgs boson, recently discovered at CERN, Europe’s particle-physics laboratory, is not just any old particle. To the despair of many physicists, it has been dubbed the “God particle”. Books on cosmology promise to reveal the “fabric of the cosmos”, while their academic authors discuss different flavours of a “theory of everything”. Read more of this post

Spain’s Richest Woman Emerges With $5 Billion Zara Stake

Spain’s Richest Woman Emerges With $5 Billion Zara Stake

By Tom Metcalf and Manuel Baigorri  Oct 31, 2013

The daughter of Inditex SA co-founder Amancio Ortega became Spain’s richest woman after inheriting her mother’s stake in the world largest clothing retailer. Sandra Ortega Mera received more than 90 percent of Rosalia Mera’s fortune, including all of holding company Rosp Corunna Participaciones Empresariales SL, after Mera died in August, according to a person with knowledge of the inheritance who asked not to be identified because the matter is private. The two had controlled the entity together prior to Mera’s death in August. Read more of this post

Where Contemporary Art Meets Buddhism

November 1, 2013, 12:11 PM

Where Contemporary Art Meets Buddhism

By Jeyup S. Kwaak

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Haein Art Project

The Temple of Haeinsa, an ancient shrine on a mountainside southeast of Seoul, is playing host to a contemporary art show. See slideshow

A South Korean Buddhist temple is playing host to a contemporary art show, in an effort to throw a new perspective to the ancient religion and the age-old surroundings. The Temple of Haeinsa, a 1,211-year-old shrine located on a mountainside 280 kilometers (174 miles) southeast of Seoul, is home to the Tripitaka Koreana, the most complete collection of Buddhist texts, laws and treaties, engraved on more than 80,000 woodblocks carved in the 13th century. The woodblocks, their storage and the surrounding temple grounds are recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Read more of this post

In the Bomb-Detecting Dogs Business, iK9 Sniffs Out an Empire

In the Bomb-Detecting Dogs Business, iK9 Sniffs Out an Empire

By Josh Dean October 31, 2013

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Vapor Wake training: (clockwise from top left) Zebow, Chachi, Boomer, Unser (twice), and Potsie

At the sight of his leash, Baxter explodes out of his crate. The leash means work, work means reward, and that’s Baxter’s entire reason for being. The adolescent yellow Labrador retriever has only eight months of training, so he yanks and skitters more than a fully trained dog. But once his handler clicks the lead onto his collar, he raises his nose and swivels his head side to side, sampling air currents, until he smells something he recognizes. Then his behavior visibly changes. Baxter is “on scent” and quickens his pace, his head and tail up, narrowing in on a cluster of vehicles. Read more of this post

Clarifying SGX’s clarification on the “penny” stock scandal in Singapore

Clarifying SGX’s clarification

Friday, Nov 01, 2013

R Sivanithy

The Business Times

In response to the tumultuous events of the past three weeks involving the speculative trio of stocks Asiasons, Blumont and LionGold, the Singapore Exchange (SGX) last Friday issued a detailed clarification to correct what it believes are misconceptions about its role as frontline market regulator. Clearly intended to be the final word on the subject, SGX’s explanations are useful as they address gaps in the public’s understanding of the way regulatory matters are handled and how the exchange views its role. Last Friday’s release should be compulsory reading for all parties interested in regulatory matters, how discipline is maintained in daily trading, and overall governance. Read more of this post

Muddy Waters: Game over for Olam if Temasek pulls out

PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 01, 2013

Muddy Waters: Game over for Olam if Temasek pulls out

ANDREA SOH SANDREA@SPH.COM.SG

Mr Block: Had not foreseen Temasek moving in to support Olam, a move which he believes was driven by systemic considerations. – PHOTO: YEN MENG JIIN

[SINGAPORE] Almost a year after it first released its report on Olam International, shortselling research firm Muddy Waters is not letting up on the agri-commodities trader yet. “My view is that if Temasek decides tomorrow that it wanted out of this investment, it would be game over within months for them, without Temasek’s backstop,” its research director Carson Block told The Business Times in his first visit to Singapore since launching its report against Olam last November. Read more of this post

Muddy Waters Attack Forces NQ Mobile CEO Khan to Fight Tarnish

Muddy Waters Attack Forces NQ Mobile CEO Khan to Fight Tarnish

By Bloomberg News  Oct 31, 2013

As Omar Khan helped whip up 1,500 guests and employees gathered in a Beijing ballroom for NQ Mobile Inc.’s eighth birthday on Oct. 25, the co-chief executive officer himself had little to celebrate. A day earlier, NQ Mobile, the maker of security software to thwart mobile-phone hackers, was accused by a research firm of inflating revenue, triggering a 47 percent stock decline. The “Never Quit” emblazoned on workers’ purple shirts was no longer just a sales slogan: It could be read as a reminder for the 38-year-old executive to dig in and defend his company. Read more of this post

How Baidu Was on Time With the Internet, Late to Mobile

How Baidu Was on Time With the Internet, Late to Mobile

By Marcus Chan and Emily Chang  Oct 30, 2013

If you listen to Robin Li tell his story about founding what would become China’s top desktop search engine, and the challenges his company now faces in a mobile world, we’re reminded of a recurring truth in tech: Timing is everything. The origins of Li’s company, Beijing-based Baidu, can be traced to his middle-school days when he spent much of his time at the library looking up information. One barrier? The library was only open to factory workers like his parents. That meant he had to borrow his dad’s ID and pretend to be him each time. Read more of this post

Starbucks Gets Ready to Go From Tall to Venti in China

Starbucks Gets Ready to Go From Tall to Venti in China

By Venessa Wong November 01, 2013

The last year, according to Starbucks (SBUX) Chief Executive Officer Howard Schultz, has been “without question the best year in its 42-year history.” Bullish numbers back up his triumphalism, even if quarterly results trailed analysts’ estimates: a 7 percent increase in global same-store sales, a 24.4 percent surge in profit, and 1,700 new stores around the world.

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Go on, bet the farm: At a crucial gathering, China’s leader must push for bold change, particularly in the countryside

Go on, bet the farm: At a crucial gathering, China’s leader must push for bold change, particularly in the countryside

Nov 2nd 2013 |From the print edition

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WHEN colleagues complain that meetings achieve nothing, silence them with eight leaden words: “third plenary session of the 11th central committee”. This five-day Communist Party gathering in December 1978 utterly changed China. Two years after the death of Mao Zedong, it put the thrice-purged Deng Xiaoping at the helm, raised the importance of livelihoods above class struggle, loosened state controls and led to the opening of China to foreign trade and investment. In a nod to the left it still clung to the “people’s communes” in the countryside that had led to mass starvation under Mao; but with Deng in charge, they soon unravelled. The consequences affected a large chunk of humanity. Annual incomes were then $200 a head; today they are $6,000. For the rest of the world, everything the plenum accomplished is contained in the shorthand “China’s rise”. Read more of this post

For Rural Bank, Being Big Also Means Big Complexities

11.01.2013 11:53

For Rural Bank, Being Big Also Means Big Complexities

Postal Savings started out large and has only grown, but its heft means making changes is hard, its president says

By staff reporters Zhang Yuzhe and Ling Huawei

(Beijing) – Understanding the complexity of the Postal Savings Bank of China (PSBC) – a spin-off of the postal service operator and now the seventh-largest bank in the country – is difficult even though more than six years have passed since it was established. The bank has never tapped the capital market for funds and thus has never been required to publish its financials. As a latecomer to banking, it is sitting on a huge stash of money that other big lenders have kept coming to for help whenever liquidity tightened. Read more of this post

Chinese Rage at the Pension System

Chinese Rage at the Pension System

By Dexter Roberts October 31, 2013

When a Beijing professor recently suggested pushing back the age at which retirees get their pensions, China’s bloggers let loose. “You’re indeed completely without conscience, a mouth filled with poison and cruelty, your heart that of a beast,” wrote one blogger from Shenyang, in Liaoning province, on the online portal Sohu.com, according to ChinaSMACK, a website that translates Chinese Internet content. “The clamor to postpone the retirement age is getting louder, a raging fire burns in my heart,” wrote another from Jiangxi province. “Tsinghua University truly has raised a bunch of garbage professors,” wrote a blogger from Guangdong, referring to Yang Yansui, director of Tsinghua’s employment and social security institute, who raised the idea. Read more of this post

Chinese land reform: A world to turn upside down

Chinese land reform: A world to turn upside down

Of the economic issues facing November’s plenum of the Chinese Communist Party, none looms larger than land reform in the countryside

Nov 2nd 2013 | BEIJING AND GUMIAN VILLAGE, GUANGDONG PROVINCE |From the print edition

MORTGAGING a village home is a sensitive issue in China. A nervous local official has warned residents of Gumian, a small farming community set amid hills and paddies in Guangdong province, that they risk leaking state secrets if they talk to a foreign reporter about the new borrowing scheme that lets them make use of the value of their houses. They talk anyway; they are excited by what is going on. Read more of this post

China Brands Follow Dior to Paris Seeking European Glitz: Retail

China Brands Follow Dior to Paris Seeking European Glitz: Retail

By Bloomberg News  Nov 1, 2013

Chinese globetrotters seeking some Western pizazz for their wardrobes in the chic boutiques of Place Vendome in Paris or London’s Mayfair are increasingly likely to end up pondering altogether more familiar garb. Shanghai Woo, a homespun Chinese maker of scarves, plans outlets in Paris, London, Milan and New York over the next three years.Bosideng International Holdings Ltd., seller of 500 yuan ($82) down jackets in China, is counting on a new store in London’s South Molton Street to lend it some allure. Hong Kong-listed Trinity Ltd. this year started selling its Kent & Curwen menswear line at New York’s Bloomingdale’s. Read more of this post

A three-way bidding war for Australian cheese that is already leading to one of Asia’s most expensive food deals is poised to become even pricier

Bid War for Cheese Heralds 13% Warrnambool Bump: Real M&A

By Angus Whitley and David Stringer  Nov 1, 2013

A three-way bidding war for Australian cheese that is already leading to one of Asia’s most expensive food deals is poised to become even pricier. Saputo Inc. (SAP) of Montreal offered $425 million for Warrnambool Cheese & Butter Factory Co. (WCB) last month, beating two bidders with a record premium for a peer in Asia, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. After Japan’s Kirin Holdings Co. (2503) this week bought about 10 percent of Warrnambool for more than Saputo’s proposed takeover price, bids may rise even higher, said RBS Morgans Ltd. Read more of this post

Twitter’s IPO: Going cheep? The microblogging firm’s shares may not be the bargain investors are hoping for

Twitter’s IPO: Going cheep? The microblogging firm’s shares may not be the bargain investors are hoping for

Nov 2nd 2013 |From the print edition

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TWITTER is already a social-media star. Now it hopes to become the toast of the stockmarket too. The firm has gradually been unveiling more information about its business. But as it gets ready for its first day of trading as a public company on the New York Stock Exchange, which looks likely to be on November 7th, opinions about a fair price for the shares vary considerably. Read more of this post

Telecoms Selling TV Have Bigger Impact on Cable Firms; Verizon and AT&T Experiment With Delivery Outside Traditional Cable-TV Bundle

Telecoms Selling TV Have Bigger Impact on Cable Firms

Verizon and AT&T Experiment With Delivery Outside Traditional Cable-TV Bundle.

SHALINI RAMACHANDRAN and THOMAS GRYTA

Updated Oct. 31, 2013 8:31 p.m. ET

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The way things are going, the term “cable TV” may have to be replaced by “phone TV.” Nearly a decade after Verizon Communications Inc. VZ -0.04% and AT&T Inc. T -0.17%began building pipelines to carry TV service to U.S. homes, they are nearing the market share of cable operators in areas where they operate, according to third-quarter results released by cable and phone companies in recent days. The top two cable providers,Comcast Corp. CMCSA +1.08% and Time Warner Cable Inc., TWC +2.80% shed 435,000 video customers in the quarter, while AT&T and Verizon added 400,000. Read more of this post

Kindles Power Up For Flight as Airlines Vie to Be First

Kindles Power Up For Flight as Airlines Vie to Be First

By Alan Levin, Todd Shields and Caroline Chen  Nov 1, 2013

One of airline travel’s least-cherished rituals, powering down electronic devices before takeoff and landing, is nearing an end — with qualifications. When and how you’re allowed to use your Amazon.com Inc. Kindle or Apple Inc. iPhone on U.S. flights will depend on what airline you’re flying, what device you’re using, what aircraft type you’re on, and maybe the weather outside. Read more of this post

Here’s What Happened When Cisco Lost A $1 Billion Deal With Amazon

Here’s What Happened When Cisco Lost A $1 Billion Deal With Amazon

JULIE BORT OCT. 31, 2013, 5:00 PM 9,479 6

Next week, on Nov. 6, Cisco will finally show off what it hopes will be a game-changing product built from its super-secret startup Insieme Networks. The product stems in part from a $1 billion deal with Amazon that collapsed before it was finalized. Insieme is creating Cisco’s answer to a new technology called “software defined networking” (SDN). SDN is a huge threat to Cisco because it changes the way companies build networks. It takes the high-end features built into expensive routers and switches and puts them into software that can run on cheaper hardware. Corporations still need to buy routers and switches, but they can buy fewer of them and cheaper ones. It also leads to all kinds of new startups based on networking software. Read more of this post

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