30 Lessons for Living: Tried and True Advice from the Wisest Americans

30 Lessons for Living: Tried and True Advice from the Wisest Americans Paperback

by Karl Pillemer Ph.D. (Author)

11376196

“Heartfelt and ever-endearing – equal parts information and inspiration. This is a book to keep by your bedside and return to often.” –Amy Dickinson, nationally syndicated advice columnist “Ask Amy” After a chance encounter with a remarkable ninety-year-old woman, renowned gerontologist Karl Pillemer decided to find out what older people know about life that the rest of us don’t. His quest led him to speak with a thousand Americans over the age of sixty-five—many of whom can remember the Depression and World War II. While some of their tales reaffirmed timeless wisdom, others surprised Pillemer with the unexpected. Now with a new preface by Jane Brody, 30 Lessons for Living distills their moving stories and hard-won advice. To learn how to live without regret, persevere through hard times, find fulfillment, and age fearlessly and well, there is no one better to ask than the people who have done it themselves. Read more of this post

How The Netherlands Became The Biggest Exporter Of Resilience

How The Netherlands Became The Biggest Exporter Of Resilience

For centuries, the Netherlands has suffered from catastrophic floods. As the rest of the world now reckons with the same fate, the Dutch are sharing–and selling–what they’ve learned.

Jeff Chu

November 1, 2013 | 9:40 AM

Huib de Vriend was five years old when the great flood of 1953 hit. It was a chilly Saturday night, and the local radio stations had gone off the air at their usual hour near bedtime, just before the full force of the storm blew in. What shook young Huib more than the whistle of the wind or the thrum of the rain was the panic in his grandmother’s voice. “She was yelling: ‘The water is coming! The water is coming!'” he recalls. That was when he knew something was wrong. His grandmother was usually a voice of calm in the family. Read more of this post

How to Save the Investment Research Industry

How to Save the Investment Research Industry

26 SEP 2013 – INDY SARKER

The investment research industry — both asset management and brokerage firms — has faced structural challenges for the past decade. Despite this, the industry has not wholeheartedly embraced innovation in its business processes. These hurdles encompass a combination of high costs, lack of significant productivity initiatives and declining value to the consumer. Today’s external customer environment of a shrinking commission pool, asset managers using fewer brokers and the rise of commission-sharing arrangements also illustrate the cost structure driving the brokerage industry. Read more of this post

Good Morning! Your Moral Fiber Is Eroding by the Minute; a person’s store of self-control is finite, and can be depleted. Like a muscle, our self-control weakens when we use it and is restored when we rest it

Good Morning! Your Moral Fiber Is Eroding by the Minute

By Drake Bennett November 01, 2013

Right now, as I write this, I am at peak integrity, but with every minute that passes, my moral fiber is weakening, like a cereal flake in milk. I don’t notice it, but if there are decisions or tasks requiring personal discipline, I should take care of them quickly—by this afternoon, I will be defenseless against my baser instincts. So say Maryam Kouchaki and Isaac Smith, researchers into organizational behavior, in a new paper in the journal Psychological Science. The idea that people can be more or less moral at different times goes back to the earliest recorded stories people told about each other: Achilles is both merciless killer and tender friend, Dr. Jekyll is Mr. Hyde. What’s notable about the hypothesis Kouchaki and Smith set out to  prove is that a person’s moral upstandingness erodes over the course of each day, broken down in a process as regular and as ineluctable as digestion. Read more of this post

Father of IBM’s first personal computer, which sold out in stores in 1981, dies of a heart attack aged 72

Father of IBM’s first personal computer, which sold out in stores in 1981, dies of a heart attack aged 72

Lowe joined IBM in 1962, when he finished college with a physics degree

He left the company in 1988 to work for Xerox

Lowe is survived by wife, Cristina Lowe, five children and 10 grandchildren

By ASSOCIATED PRESS

PUBLISHED: 21:06 GMT, 31 October 2013 | UPDATED: 22:09 GMT, 31 October 2013

article-2482131-191C090400000578-775_634x651 article-2482131-191C9D2A00000578-349_634x425

William C. Lowe (pictured in 1987 with an IBM computer) died of a heart attack in Illinois at age 72; The IBM personal computer introduced in 1984 was a massive hit and changed society

The man behind IBM’s first ever personal computer, which sold out in stores in 1981 for $1,565, has died at the age of 72. William C. Lowe died of a heart attack on October 19 in Illinois, his daughter Michelle Marshall confirmed. Marshall said she didn’t realize the magnitude of what her father helped accomplish until she was an adult.

Read more of this post

Bible-toting Gary Wang sentenced to prison for his involvement in the EMG and Rebar Group (力霸集團) embezzlement scandals

Bible-toting Gary Wang sentenced to prison

By Ashley Yen, Special to The China Post
November 2, 2013, 12:15 am TWN

p16c

TAIPEI, Taiwan — Former Eastern Multimedia Group (EMG, 東森集團) Chairman Gary Wang (王令麟) reported to the Taipei District Prosecutors’ Office yesterday with a Bible in his hands to begin serving his prison term. Wang was given a five-year, six-month sentence for his involvement in the EMG and Rebar Group (力霸集團) embezzlement scandals. Wang was escorted in handcuffs by his attorney and the police. He expressed his apologies to the public in front of the prosecutors’ office. Read more of this post

The Outsiders Who Saw Our Economic Future; In both America’s energy transformation and the financial crisis, it took a group of amateurs to see what was coming

The Outsiders Who Saw Our Economic Future

In both America’s energy transformation and the financial crisis, it took a group of amateurs to see what was coming

WSJ reporter Gregory Zuckerman, author of ‘The Frackers’, discusses how early pioneers of the fracking industry were seen as outsiders and ‘wildcatters’ by the established oil industry.

GREGORY ZUCKERMAN

Nov. 1, 2013 8:35 p.m. ET

The experts keep getting it wrong. And the oddballs keep getting it right.

Over the past five years of business history, two events have shocked and transformed the nation. In 2007 and 2008, the housing market crumbled and the financial system collapsed, causing trillions of dollars of losses. Around the same time, a few little-known wildcatters began pumping meaningful amounts of oil and gas from U.S. shale formations. A country that once was running out of energy now is on track to become the world’s leading producer. Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: