Don’t ignore Myanmar politics, Suu Kyi tells EU investors as it heads towards crucial 2015 elections

Don’t ignore Myanmar politics, Suu Kyi tells EU investors

Thursday, November 14, 2013 – 21:43

AFP

YANGON – Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi told investors at a European Union forum Thursday that business leaders should not ignore the country’s political challenges as it heads towards crucial 2015 elections. The veteran activist, who rejected suggestions that her party would slow economic progress if it came to power, said constitutional change was imperative for the economic development of the nation, seen as a key regional developing market. “Anybody who encourages business or investment or any other activity in Burma while at the same time totally ignoring the need to amend the constitution is not being pragmatic,” she said, using the country’s former name. Read more of this post

Is This a Bubble? As stocks Hit Records, Some Analysts and Economists Are Getting Worried. Here’s What to Do Now

Is This a Bubble?

As stocks Hit Records, Some Analysts and Economists Are Getting Worried. Here’s What to Do Now.

JOE LIGHT

Nov. 15, 2013 5:59 p.m. ET

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At first, it sure looks like a bubble. Some hot stocks have more than doubled in price so far this year. The initial-public-offering market has been torrid. Small investors are buying stocks again. The “bubble talk” flared up even more afterTwitter TWTR -1.59% started trading on Nov. 7, when the social-media company’s shares surged 73%. They still are up 69%. Electric-car company Tesla MotorsTSLA -1.56% has rocketed 300% higher in 2013, and online retailing giant Amazon.comAMZN +0.48% has jumped 47%. There are so many superlatives in the stock market that it is easy to forget the S&P 500 has set 36 records this year on the way to its 26% gain—or that the federal debt-ceiling crisis threatened to disrupt the economy just a month ago. During the U.S. Senate confirmation hearing Thursday for Janet Yellen, the nominee to replace Ben Bernanke as head of the Federal Reserve, Sen. Mike Johanns (R., Neb.) said he thinks the Fed’s loose monetary policy is pumping up the stock and real-estate markets. “What am I missing here?” he said. “I see asset bubbles.” Ms. Yellen responded, “We have to watch this very carefully, but I don’t see this as an asset bubble.” Read more of this post

Tuition madness, Gangnam style

Tuition madness, Gangnam style

Last month, TODAY reported that the Ministry of Education was reviewing its policy of allowing teachers to give private tuition, as calls grew for the policy to be tightened or scrapped completely. Over the years, there have been perennial calls among the public for the authorities to do more to regulate the tuition sector, which some feared had got out of hand.

BY NG JING YNG –

4 HOURS 49 MIN AGO

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Last month, TODAY reported that the Ministry of Education was reviewing its policy of allowing teachers to give private tuition, as calls grew for the policy to be tightened or scrapped completely. Over the years, there have been perennial calls among the public for the authorities to do more to regulate the tuition sector, which some feared had got out of hand. In South Korea, where the tuition craze has reached fever pitch, the government has tried to regulate the industry — to mixed success — such as introducing a curfew on the operating hours of tuition centres and considering a ban against tutors teaching students what they have yet to learn in school. In the first instalment of a two-part special report, TODAY examines the situation in South Korea’s capital Seoul, including in the affluent Gangnam district, and the factors driving the high demand for tuition. The second part on Monday will look at how the government and some groups in South Korean society, including school leaders, parents and a former “star” tutor, are trying to do more to fight against the tide and wean children off tuition.

SEOUL — On a Thursday evening last month, this reporter was at one of the popular tuition-centre zones, Daechi-dong, in Gangnam district. With just weeks to go before the high-stakes college-entrance exams, which are held every November, the streets were quiet, in contrast to the intense activity taking place behind closed doors. Read more of this post

The World of English Freedoms; It’s no accident that the English-speaking nations are the ones most devoted to law and individual rights

The World of English Freedoms

It’s no accident that the English-speaking nations are the ones most devoted to law and individual rights, writes Daniel Hannan

DANIEL HANNAN

Nov. 15, 2013 6:17 p.m. ET

Asked, early in his presidency, whether he believed in American exceptionalism, Barack Obama gave a telling reply. “I believe in American exceptionalism, just as I suspect the Brits believe in British exceptionalism and the Greeks believe in Greek exceptionalism.” The first part of that answer is fascinating (we’ll come back to the Greeks in a bit). Most Brits do indeed believe in British exceptionalism. But here’s the thing: They define it in almost exactly the same way that Americans do. British exceptionalism, like its American cousin, has traditionally been held to reside in a series of values and institutions: personal liberty, free contract, jury trials, uncensored newspapers, regular elections, habeas corpus, open competition, secure property, religious pluralism. Read more of this post

Hong Kong Property Still in Danger of Overheating, HKMA Says, and a rise in interest rates would “indisputably” affect the city

Hong Kong Property Still in Danger of Overheating, HKMA Says

Hong Kong’s property market is still in danger of overheating and a rise in interest rates would “indisputably” affect the city, Norman Chan, chief executive of the Hong Kong Monetary Authority said today. The outlook for Hong Kong’s property market was uncertain and it wasn’t clear whether it had entered a downward cycle, Chan said at a legislative briefing. Emerging markets would face the risk of capital outflow, currency depreciation and a decline of asset prices once the U.S. Federal Reserve starts tapering stimulus, he said. Read more of this post

Playing China’s Investing Frontier; The move by China to open its local stock markets is triggering a new wave of ETFs

Playing China’s Investing Frontier

The move by China to open its local stock markets is triggering a new wave of ETFs.

MURRAY COLEMAN

Nov. 15, 2013 6:28 p.m. ET

The $1.2 trillion stock market in mainland China—home to the world’s second-largest economy—is opening up even more to foreign investors, but hazards still abound. The Deutsche Bank‘s DBK.XE -0.35% db X-trackers Harvest CSI 300 Index ETF,ASHR +4.36% the first U.S.-listed exchange-traded fund to invest directly in China’s A-shares, began trading on the New York Stock Exchange on Nov. 6. A-shares, which trade on the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges, have been largely closed off to foreign investors. Read more of this post

“Please take good care of Microsoft.” Ballmer on Ballmer: His Exit From Microsoft; Ballmer on how he came to believe he wasn’t the best person to remake the technology giant for its next act

Ballmer on Ballmer: His Exit From Microsoft

MONICA LANGLEY

Updated Nov. 15, 2013 4:34 p.m. ET

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REDMOND, Wash.— Steve Ballmer paced his corner office on a foggy January morning here, listening through loudspeakers to his directors’ voices on a call that would set in motion the end of his 13-year reign as Microsoft Corp.’s MSFT -0.47% chief executive. Microsoft lagged behind Apple Inc.AAPL -0.60% and Google Inc.GOOG -0.16% in important consumer markets, despite its formidable software revenue. Mr. Ballmer tried to spell out his plan to remake Microsoft, but a director cut him off, telling him he was moving too slowly. Read more of this post

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