New Interview: Buffett On What He Learned From Munger [VIDEO]

New Interview: Buffett On What He Learned From Munger [VIDEO]

by ValueWalk StaffNovember 7, 2013

Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett talks about how his business partner Charlie Munger analyzes business more thoroughly than most investors.

 

 

Bill Gates: What I Learned in the Fight Against Polio; India’s success in eradicating polio offers lessons for solving other human welfare issues world-wide

Bill Gates: What I Learned in the Fight Against Polio

India’s success in eradicating polio offers lessons for solving other human welfare issues world-wide

BILL GATES

Nov. 8, 2013 8:01 p.m. ET

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Bill Gates meets with a farmer in the Indian village of Guleria in May 2010 to talk about the country’s polio program. India has now been polio-free for more than two years. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Our foundation began working in India a decade ago, at a time when many feared that the country would become a flashpoint for HIV/AIDS. Since then, we have expanded into other areas, including vaccines, family planning and agricultural development. In all of this work, Melinda and I have seen many examples of India’s poor making dramatic contributions. But nowhere has this power been demonstrated more clearly than in the fight to end polio. Indeed, India’s accomplishment in eradicating polio is the most impressive global health success I’ve ever seen. Read more of this post

he First Step to Being Powerful; Own your story, and you own your life. Talk to yourself as a friend, not an enemy. And remember, you cannot change anything unless you first see your own self as powerful enough to act. The way we talk of ourselves and to ourselves grants power – narrative power — to what happens next.

The First Step to Being Powerful

by Nilofer Merchant  |   9:00 AM November 8, 2013

“I am such a big failure. I can’t believe that I’ve made this mistake and it’s cost me months and months of time.  I might never recover…What an idiot to not see that one coming.” On and on, he went. In distress, my colleague was clearly suffering because of a recent fiasco. Seeking counsel, he had come to me supposedly to problem solve. But all he could focus on was how this incident made him a failure. I got frustrated listening to him. Not at his words, but at how vicious he was being to himself. In the end, my advice was not as cogent and articulate as I had intended — I used a popular vernacular term for bovine droppings — but I stand by it. Read more of this post

Chinese engineering machinery firms suffer mounting bad debt

Chinese engineering machinery firms suffer mounting bad debt

Staff Reporter

2013-11-09

As a harbinger of the economic climate, leading engineering machinery firms in China, including Sany, Zoomlion, XCMG, are feeling the pinch of a possible economic downturn. In order to boost its sales, Sany Heavy Industry is now accepting a range of orders, instead of only processing orders from major clients. The company is now expecting a marked increase in bad debt. According to their financial statements, in the first nine months this year the revenue of Sany, Zoomlion and XCMG tumbled 26.5%, 26.1% and 25% year-on-year, respectively, with their net profits scoring even sharper declines of 49.3%, 45.48% and 46.3%. Meanwhile, as of the end of September, their accounts receivable totaled 68 billion yuan (US$11.5 billion): 22.55 billion yuan (US$3.7 billion) for Sany, 25.6 billion yuan (US$4.2 billion) for Zoomlion and 19.8 billion yuan (US$3.2 billion) for XCMG, up 50.6%, 35.6% and 11.5% respectively over the amounts at the beginning of the year. Read more of this post

The real kings of shareholder value; “When we long for life without difficulties, remind ourselves that oaks grow strong in contrary winds and diamonds are made under pressure.”

November 8, 2013 7:08 pm

The real kings of shareholder value

By Nigel Thomas

Some managers are delivering excellent returns

Investors often see the term “shareholder value” bandied about. Company managers are very fond of using it. But what exactly does it mean – and in an era of low growth and rock-bottom interest rates, how can we be sure that managers are committed to generating it? Shareholder value originally rose to prominence to solve what Adam Smith called the “agency problem”. This relates to the age-old temptation for managers or executives of a company potentially to follow a course of action that was favourable to them as a group but detrimental, in the long-run, to the company’s beneficial owners – the shareholders. Read more of this post

All Of Britain Has Waited An Entire Year So It Can Burst Into Tears In Front Of This One TV Commercial

All Of Britain Has Waited An Entire Year So It Can Burst Into Tears In Front Of This One TV Commercial

JIM EDWARDS NOV. 8, 2013, 11:05 AM 10,575 16

If you’re not British, the words “John Lewis Christmas ad” won’t mean much to you. But in the U.K., the arrival of the department store chain’s annual Christmas commercial (or “advert” as they say) marks the unofficial beginning of the holiday season — and John Lewis usually delivers an epic, and epically expensive, emotional rollercoaster of a spot that frequently leaves the nation choking back tears. The new one was given a premier in London’s West End, as if it were a movie. Just try watching Lewis’s 2011 ad, and not crying. It’s a counter-intuitive tale of an apparently selfish young boy counting down the days to Xmas, set to a mournful song by The Smiths. Or the 2012 ad, which showed a snowman’s grueling, lonely journey to give his snow-girlfriend a gift of a pair of red gloves. I know, it sounds stupid. But the Brits — some of them at least — will again be quietly weeping at their desks in front of YouTube and in their living rooms for the next few days over this year’s story. Lewis hired Disney animators who took six months to make the ad, an animated feature that shows a bear and a hare wordlessly weathering a winter in the woods before … well, I won’t spoil it for you. The ad features a terrifically sad song by Keane as sung by Lily Allen.

The 5% Club of apprentices can build a better British economy; Defence company chief executive Leo Quinn explains why ensuring 5pc of employees are apprentices, sponsored students or graduates is key to creating employability and employment

The 5% Club of apprentices can build a better British economy

Defence company chief executive Leo Quinn explains why ensuring 5pc of employees are apprentices, sponsored students or graduates is key to creating employability and employment

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Qinetiq chief executive Leo Quinn

By Leo Quinn, Chief executive, QinetiQ

6:01AM GMT 08 Nov 2013

Britain’s pedigree for engineering and innovation is part of its DNA. It is something of which we are rightly proud, yet tragically seem happy to watch fade gradually into history as an inevitable kind of decline. For over a century, our engineers were world-famous. Trained by British apprenticeships and universities, they made this country a byword for invention. On their shoulders a small island stood tall, ranged far and built many wonders of the modern world. Read more of this post

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