Investing in Korea: Staying Rational Despite Samsung’s Halo Effect. Bamboo Innovator is featured in BeyondProxy.com, where value investing lives

Bamboo Innovator is featured in BeyondProxy.com, where value investing lives:

Investing in Korea: Staying Rational Despite Samsung’s Halo Effect, June 5, 2013 (Weblink: BeyondProxy.com)

Korea

When people take professions according to their personal inclinations, they perform work effortlessly, efficiently and joyously

Translating Ideas into Reality

by Ashu Khanna | Jun 6, 2013

When people take professions according to their personal inclinations, they perform work effortlessly, efficiently and joyously

“Often the difference between a successful person and a failure is not one who has better abilities and ideas but the courage to bet on one’s ideas, take a calculated risk and to act.” Andre Malraux

There is often a gap between intention and action. This incongruence arises due to our thoughts that creep in while taking action. Our interpretations, perceptions, beliefs, fears and attachments impact the quality of action. Our thoughts are so deeply embedded that we keep tumbling from one action to another, completely unaware of the intensity and significance of their influence on our life.   Read more of this post

Harvard’s Kaplan Says to Succeed Know What You Want

Harvard’s Kaplan Says to Succeed Know What You Want

By Zinta Lundborg  May 30, 2013

“You’ve got to take ownership of your own life,” says Robert Steven Kaplan. He’s written “What You’re Really Meant to Do: A Road Map for Reaching Your Unique Potential” to show people how to find satisfaction in their careers and their lives. It’s not a touchy-feely self-help tome, but a step-by-step guide to finding your true path written by a former investment banker: Kaplan moved to the Harvard Business School in 2005 from the Goldman Sachs Group (GS), where he was vice-chairman. We spoke at Bloomberg world headquarters in New York.

Lundborg: We’re living in tough times in terms of the job market, so perhaps people don’t have the luxury to do what they’re really meant to do?

Kaplan: All this is relative to your options. If you’ve got no option but to wash dishes, my advice is wash dishes. I still want you to think about your strengths and weaknesses. I want you to take a little time on the weekend or whatever to step back. Don’t let crisis management become a way of life. Read more of this post

The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance

The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance [Hardcover]

Steven Kotler (Author)

Book Description

Release date: March 4, 2014

In this groundbreaking book, New York Times–bestselling author Steven Kotler decodes the mystery of ultimate human performance. Drawing on over a decade of research and first-hand reporting with dozens of top action and adventure sports athletes like big wave legend Laird Hamilton, big mountain snowboarder Jeremy Jones, and skateboarding pioneer Danny Way, Kotler explores the frontier science of “flow,” an optimal state of consciousness in which we perform and feel our best.

Building a bridge between the extreme and the mainstream, The Rise of Superman explains how these athletes are using flow to do the impossible and how we can use this information to radically accelerate performance in our own lives.

At its core, this is a book about profound possibility; about what is actually possible for our species; about where—if anywhere—our limits lie. Read more of this post

Famed speculator and hedge fund manager Victor Niederhoffer after he lost everything in the 1997 Asian Crisis [video]

Victor Niederhoffer after he lost everything in the 1997 Asian Crisis

June 3, 2013 by Mick Weinstein

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The following remarkable video was edited from a longer Japanese documentary. Famed speculator and hedge fund manager Victor Niederhoffer is interviewed in his emptied-out mansion after he lost everything (“a staggering amount”) in the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis. Don’t miss the George Soros cameo with a bikini-clad woman. As Joshua Wallis notes, the video is “a reminder of the perils of leverage and the consequences of unpredictability.” Niederhoffer managed to dust himself off after this and achieve something of his former glory with his Matador Fund, which did very well until Niederhoffer blew up again in 2007. For more on Niederhoffer, see John Cassidy’s excellent 2007 New Yorker profile.

THE BLOW-UP ARTIST

Can Victor Niederhoffer survive another market crisis?

by John CassidyOCTOBER 15, 2007

Niederhoffer’s approach is eclectic. His funds, a friend says, appeal “to people like him: self-made people who have a maverick streak.” Read more of this post

Smithfield: How Sausage Was Made; Joseph W. Luter III transformed his family’s firm into a global giant

Updated June 5, 2013, 8:14 p.m. ET

Smithfield: How Sausage Was Made

‘Seeds Were Planted’ 7 Years Ago, Luter Says, When He Suggested Joint Venture to Shuanghui Chair

By DAVID KESMODEL

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Joseph W. Luter III transformed his family’s firm into a global giant

It was a brief meeting of the two most powerful people in pork. The encounter between Joseph W. Luter III, chairman of Smithfield Foods Inc.,SFD +0.33% the world’s largest pork processor, and Wan Long, chairman of Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd., known as “China’s No. 1 Butcher,” lasted only 90 minutes about seven years ago. Hosting Mr. Wan in his Manhattan apartment, Mr. Luter floated the idea of a joint venture, saying “we ought to do something together.” And that laid the foundation, Mr. Luter said in an interview this week, for a very different tie-up: last week’s $4.7 billion deal for Shuanghui to buy Smithfield in the biggest Chinese takeover of a U.S. company. “Seeds were planted,” the 73-year-old Mr. Luter said, “and sometimes it takes a while for seeds to germinate.” Read more of this post

Moneysupermarket.com founder Simon Nixon lands £200m windfall; Businessman bored by accountancy cashes in after strong demand for shares in price comparison site

Moneysupermarket.com founder Simon Nixon lands £200m windfall

Businessman bored by accountancy cashes in after strong demand for shares in price comparison site

Rupert Neate

The Guardian, Wednesday 5 June 2013 23.45 BST

Simon Nixon

Simon Nixon, who founded the price comparison website Moneysupermarket.com. Photograph: Adrian Sherratt /Rex Features

Simon Nixon, the businessman who founded the price comparison siteMoneysupermarket.com after dropping out of studying accountancy at university because it was “boring”, has landed a £200m windfall.

Nixon – who had already banked a £100m fortune when the website joined the stock market in 2007 – has sold 100m shares, raising another £200m in cash.

Ferrari-loving Nixon, 45, will also collect about £20m from a dividend payout on his remaining 29% stake in the company. Nixon, who is understood to be relocating to Jersey for tax reasons, founded the website after quitting an accountancy course at Nottingham University because, according to an interview at the time of the flotation, “I hated it. It was boring.” Read more of this post

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