Some Autistic Children Don’t Find Pleasure in Voices because of a physical disconnect between the brain regions involved in speaking and those linked to rewards

Some Autistic Children Don’t Find Pleasure in Voices

Children with autism spectrum disorder may not perceive human voices as pleasurable because of a physical disconnect between the brain regions involved in speaking and those linked to rewards, a study suggests.

Brain imaging determined that the connections between the two brain regions were stronger in children who don’t have the disorder than in those diagnosed with it, said Daniel Abrams, the lead author. That’s important because communication problems are key diagnostic criteria for autism.

One in 50 U.S. children are diagnosed with autism or a related disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The majority have difficulty using language effectively, including being unable to grasp nuances of speech such as rhythm and tone, according to the National Institutes of Health. The newest research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to suggest why. Read more of this post

Netflix Push Into Kids’ TV Shows With DreamWorks

Netflix Rises on Deal for Exclusive DreamWorks Programs

Netflix Inc. (NFLX), the dominant subscription video-streaming service, rose as much as 6 percent after agreeing to a multiyear deal with DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc. (DWA) to obtain original programming.

Netflix shares climbed $12.72 to $226.71 at 10:18 a.m. in New York, the biggest intraday increase since April 23. The stock has more than doubled this year. DreamWorks jumped 5.2 percent to $24. Read more of this post

Online Video-Ad Startups Rivaling Google Seen Near IPOs

Online Video-Ad Startups Rivaling Google Seen Near IPOs

Demand for Web commercials played alongside video clips is fueling growth at marketing startups, putting such companies as Tremor Video Inc., YuMe Inc. and Adap.tv Inc. on course for initial public offerings this year.

All three have picked bankers or are in discussions to sell shares to the public, according to people familiar with their plans, who asked not to be identified because the information hasn’t been publicly disclosed. Read more of this post

GE Hiring Thousands of Engineers to Build Industrial Web to connect everything from jet engines to medical-imaging machines to the Web and help customers run equipment more efficiently.

GE Hiring Thousands of Engineers to Build Industrial Web

General Electric Co. (GE) is hiring thousands of engineers near San Francisco in a push to connect everything from jet engines to medical-imaging machines to the Web and help customers run equipment more efficiently.

“We’ve opened a software center in East Bay, hiring thousands of software engineers to basically bring all the great innovation you’ve seen in Silicon Valley now to industry,” Beth Comstock, chief marketing officer at GE, said at the Bloomberg Next Big Thing Summit in Half Moon Bay, California. Read more of this post

Australia eyes Buddha and baccarat to lure Chinese tourists

Australia eyes Buddha and baccarat to lure Chinese tourists

Mon, Jun 17 2013

By Jane Wardell

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia’s coastal Wyong region outside Sydney, a pretty stretch of pristine beaches and wildlife-filled wetlands, isn’t high on the travel agenda of most Chinese tourists.

But the local mayor and a Chinese businessman have big plans to change that – by building a A$500 million ($480 million) theme park that will include a full-size replica of Beijing’s Forbidden City and a nine-storey temple housing a giant Buddha. Read more of this post

China Insiders Sell Most Shares in May in 4 Years, UBS Says

China Insiders Sell Most Shares in May in 4 Years, UBS Says

Major shareholders, senior management and individuals with stakes of more than 5 percent sold a net 24.7 billion yuan ($4 billion) of Chinese A shares in May, the most for a month since June 2009, UBS AG said.

The biggest sales were in computer-related shares, media and “special equipment” sectors, UBS strategists including Qin Xia wrote in a report dated today. Net stakes rose only in chemical raw materials and telecom operations, while the sell-off in smaller companies as a percentage of the free-float reached new post-2008 highs, they wrote.

Insiders sold as the Shanghai Composite Index climbed 5.6 percent in May, the biggest advance since December, and as more locked-up shares became tradable. The benchmark index has slumped 6.5 percent in June as data from exports to industrial production pointed to slowing growth and higher money-market rates signaled tighter liquidity. Read more of this post

China Foreign-Investment Gains Ease as Economic Slowdown Deepens

China Foreign-Investment Gains Ease as Economic Slowdown Deepens

Foreign direct investment in China rose in May by the least in four months, a sign of concern that growth is slowing in the world’s second-biggest economy.

Inbound non-financial investment increased 0.3 percent from a year earlier to $9.26 billion, the Ministry of Commerce said today in a statement in Beijing, after a 0.4 percent gain in April. China’s outbound investment rose 20 percent in the first five months of the year to $34.3 billion, compared with a 27.4 percent pace in January-April.

The report follows data indicating capital inflows slowed last month while growth decelerated in exports, industrial production and lending. Confidence is fading in an economic rebound this quarter, with investment banks from Morgan Stanley to Barclays Plc cutting their 2013 expansion forecasts. Read more of this post

GM Vows to Show China That Cadillac of Autos Isn’t Audi

GM Vows to Show China That Cadillac of Autos Isn’t Audi

As Vincent Qiu weighed his options for buying a new sport-utility vehicle in Beijing, he was drawn to the Cadillac SRX.

The SUV’s aggressive chrome grille, massive vertical headlamps and sharp creases along the body make the vehicle unique on China roads, where the rounded and organic shapes of Volkswagen AG (VOW)’s Audi and General Motors Co. (GM)’s Buick are popular.

“You can easily spot Audis on the roads, but not Cadillacs,” Qiu, 41, who runs an office-supply company, said last week in an interview. “But it is a big-ticket purchase and in the end my wife talked me into playing it safe and buying something that is more popular.” He bought an Audi Q5. Read more of this post

China Emission Trading Experiment Unlikely to Ease Cities’ Smog

China Emission Trading Experiment Unlikely to Ease Cities’ Smog

China’s plan to set up markets to trade emissions will make it second only to Europe in efforts to put a price on pumping carbon into the atmosphere. For cities choking on the nation’s smog, expect little relief.

Seven pilot carbon-trading programs are scheduled to start this year, with the first opening today in Shenzhen, followed by Beijing, Shanghai, Guangdong, Tianjin, Chongqing and Hubei. They are set to regulate 800 million to 1 billion tons of emissions by 2015 in the world’s biggest cap-and-trade program after Europe’s, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Read more of this post

Craft Brewers Chug Away Heady Pressure by Bankers to Sell

Craft Brewers Chug Away Heady Pressure by Bankers to Sell

SweetWater Brewing Co. Chief Executive Officer Freddy Bensch gets plenty of solicitations from potential acquirers.

One stands out: a handwritten note with a crisp $50 bill from a banker begging for a meeting. The greenback was so pristine and odd a gesture that Bensch wondered if it was real.

“We took that $50 bill over to the pub and spent it on beers and they accepted it,” said Bensch, who co-founded the maker of hoppy 420 Extra Pale Ale and chocolaty Exodus Porter with a college roommate. “We didn’t accept the meeting. We toasted him when we were buying beers with his 50.” Read more of this post

Rubber Poised for Record Glut as Shippers End Curbs

Rubber Poised for Record Glut as Shippers End Curbs: Commodities

Rubber is headed for the biggest glut on record, prolonging the bear market that began in April, as supply exceeds demand for a third year and Southeast Asian exporters ended curbs on shipments.

The surplus will expand 57 percent to 490,000 metric tons this year, enough to meet U.S. demand for six months, according to RCMA Commodities Asia Group, the Singapore-based company that has traded rubber for nine decades. Futures in Tokyo, a global benchmark, will drop at least another 4.9 percent to 225 yen a kilogram ($2,373 a ton) by the end of December, according to the median of 16 analyst estimates compiled by Bloomberg. Five anticipate 200 yen, a price last seen in 2009. Read more of this post

EU Car Sales Fall to 20-Year Low as Joblessness at Record

EU Car Sales Fall to 20-Year Low as Joblessness at Record

European Union car sales in May fell to a 20-year low as rising joblessness caused by a recession in the euro region contributed to falling demand at PSA Peugeot Citroen (UG), Renault SA (RNO) and General Motors Co. (GM)

Registrations in the 27-member EU dropped 5.9 percent to 1.04 million vehicles from 1.11 million cars a year earlier, reaching the lowest level for the month since 1993, the Brussels-based European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association, or ACEA, said today in a statement. Including figures from Switzerland, Norway and Iceland, sales in May fell 5.9 percent to 1.08 million cars. Read more of this post

Protests Show Brazilian Dream Fading as Rousseff Popularity Ebbs

Protests Show Brazilian Dream Fading as Rousseff Popularity Ebbs

Francisco Soares, a 32-year-old Brasilia electrician, felt good about life two years ago when he started commuting in his first car, blasting the music and passing packed buses. Since then, bills started piling up, the cost of living jumped and last week he had to sell his wheels.

After a decade that saw 40 million people rise from poverty, Brazil’s middle class finds itself squeezed by faster inflation, rising debt and a weaker currency. Consumers are spending less at supermarkets and hairdressers as the classic weekend event, a prime cut barbecue, becomes a stretch for some. Continuing a wave of protests sparked by an increase in bus fares, demonstrators surrounded Congress in Brasilia yesterday and set a car on fire in Rio de Janeiro as tens of thousands marched in major cities. Read more of this post

Road building revival offers rare hope for India infrastructure overhaul

Road building revival offers rare hope for India infrastructure overhaul

Mon, Jun 17 2013

By Matthias Williams and Swati Pandey

NEW DELHI/MUMBAI (Reuters) – K. Ramchand, managing director at one of India’s biggest road builders, is doing something unusual to help dispel the gloom pervading much of the country’s infrastructure sector today: bidding for new projects.

His company, IL&FS Transportation Networks Ltd (ILFT.NS: QuoteProfileResearchStock Buzz), signed a $300 million contract in April to build a six-lane highway. The project will link an eastern industrial zone afflicted by some of India’s worst traffic snarls to mining districts such as Dhanbad, the nation’s coal capital. Read more of this post

Analysis: Companies may turn to courts on U.S. natural gas export push

Analysis: Companies may turn to courts on U.S. natural gas export push

1:59am EDT

By Ayesha Rascoe

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. companies hoping to export natural gas are frustrated by lengthy delays and rule changes as they await U.S. Department of Energy approval of their applications and may turn to the courts to speed up the process.

Both the slow pace of decisions on applications to ship U.S. liquefied natural gas abroad and the process for making those decisions could be challenged, legal sources say.

Potential strategies could be laid out during a House of Representatives panel on Tuesday, which will focus on the current impediments to U.S. LNG exports. Read more of this post

It’s Just Like Magic: The Economics of Harry Potter

It’s Just Like Magic: The Economics of Harry Potter

Darwyyn Deyo George Mason University – Department of Economics

Marta Podemska-Mikluch Beloit College

May 31, 2013

Abstract:      
Do the laws of economics apply in the magical world of Harry Potter? We argue that even though J.K Rowling placed her characters in a world of magic, wizards remain subject to the implications of scarcity and must obey economic principles. As a result, the series is abundant with illustrations of choice within constraint, marginal thinking, the power of incentives, and the role of institutions. The contents of the books, along with their extraordinary popularity, provide a tool powerful enough to inspire students to adopt the economic way of thinking for life. We demonstrate the pedagogical potential of the series by providing examples for each of Mankiw’s Ten Key Principles of Economics.

Asia’s Enron: Satyam (Sanskrit Word for Truth)

Asia’s Enron: Satyam (Sanskrit Word for Truth)

Elisabetta Basilico University of St. Gallen

Hugh Grove University of Denver

Lorenzo Patelli University of Denver – School of Accountancy; SDA Bocconi; Benedictine College

2012
Journal of Forensic & Investigative Accounting, Vol. 4, Issue 2, 2012

Abstract: 
In this paper, we analyze the 2009 scandal of Satyam, one of India’s largest information technology companies and provider of computer software and business process outsourcing to large companies around the world; including General Motors, Nestlé, and General Electric. We discuss financial and non-financial red flags. Specifically, we apply five financial fraud prediction measures and examine corporate governance elements. The results of our analyses suggest the importance of integrating financial and non-financial indicators. Supplementing financial indicators with non-financial red flags enables us to present the reverse KISS principle by Hilb (2005).

The Gift of Doubt: Albert O. Hirschman and the power of failure.

THE GIFT OF DOUBT

Albert O. Hirschman and the power of failure.

by Malcolm GladwellJUNE 24, 2013

Hirschman was a planner who saw virtue in the fact that nothing went as planned. Illustration by Ricardo Martinez.

In the mid-nineteenth century, work began on a crucial section of the railway line connecting Boston to the Hudson River. The addition would run from Greenfield, Massachusetts, to Troy, New York, and it required tunnelling through Hoosac Mountain, a massive impediment, nearly five miles thick, that blocked passage between the Deerfield Valley and a tributary of the Hudson.

James Hayward, one of New England’s leading railroad engineers, estimated that penetrating the Hoosac would cost, at most, a very manageable two million dollars. The president of Amherst College, an accomplished geologist, said that the mountain was composed of soft rock and that tunnelling would be fairly easy once the engineers had breached the surface. “The Hoosac . . . is believed to be the only barrier between Boston and the Pacific,” the project’s promoter, Alvah Crocker, declared. Read more of this post

12 Of The Shrewdest Business Maneuvers Of All Time

12 Of The Shrewdest Business Maneuvers Of All Time

MAX NISEN AND ALEXANDRA MONDALEK JUN. 17, 2013, 8:54 AM 14,405 6

The success of failure of a business can come down to one single bold decision. A recent thread on Quora asked users to name the “the shrewdest, smartest maneuver you’ve ever seen in business.” We’ve broken out some of the best answers, including critical decisions by Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Henry Ford. Bill Gates originally wrote a PC operating system for IBM. He convinced them to let him sell it to others, starting him on the way to becoming the richest man in the world.

Bill Gates using an early version of Microsoft Excel

bill-gates-originally-wrote-a-pc-operating-system-for-ibm-he-convinced-them-to-let-him-sell-it-to-others-starting-him-on-the-way-to-becoming-the-richest-man-in-the-world

Via Quora user Prakul Agarwal:

Back in the 1980s, IBM asked Bill Gates to produce the operating system for its PCs. He licensed an operating system from Tim Patterson (QDOS) for $50,000, modified it, named it MS-DOS, and sold it to IBM. Gates managed to convince IBM to let him market the system separately, because IBM thought all of the money was in hardware. When other companies started to build their own PCs, MS-DOS was the standard, and Microsoft made a fortune.  Read more of this post

Becoming a Better Judge of People

Becoming a Better Judge of People

by Anthony K. Tjan  |   9:00 AM June 17, 2013

In business and in life, the most critical choices we make relate to people. Yet being a good judge of people is difficult. How do we get better at sizing up first impressions, at avoiding hiring mistakes, at correctly picking (and not missing) rising stars?

The easy thing to do is focus on extrinsic markers — academic scores, net worth, social status, job titles. Social media has allowed us to add new layers of extrinsic scoring: How many friends do they have on Facebook? Who do we know in common through LinkedIn? How many Twitter followers do they have?

But such extrinsic credentials and markers only tell one part of a person’s story. They are necessary, but not sufficient. What they miss are the “softer” and more nuanced intrinsic that are far more defining of a person’s character. You can teach skills; character and attitude, not so much. Read more of this post

In the Google age, approach to education needs a rethink

In the Google age, approach to education needs a rethink

Would a person with good handwriting, spelling and grammar and instant recall of multiplication tables be considered a better candidate for a job than, say, one who knows how to configure a peer-to-peer network of devices, set up an organisation-wide Google calendar and find out where the most reliable sources of venture capital are, I wonder? The former set of skills is taught in schools, the latter is not.

BY SUGATA MITRA –

4 HOURS 32 MIN AGO

Would a person with good handwriting, spelling and grammar and instant recall of multiplication tables be considered a better candidate for a job than, say, one who knows how to configure a peer-to-peer network of devices, set up an organisation-wide Google calendar and find out where the most reliable sources of venture capital are, I wonder? The former set of skills is taught in schools, the latter is not.

In school examinations, learners must reproduce facts from memory, solve problems using their minds and paper alone. They must not talk to anyone or look at anyone else’s work. They must not use any educational resources, certainly not the Internet. Read more of this post

Montreal Mayor Arrested by Quebec Anti-Corruption Police; charges are linked to illegal payments in two real-estate transactions

Montreal Mayor Arrested by Quebec Anti-Corruption Police

Montreal Mayor Michael Applebaum faces 14 criminal charges, including fraud and breach of trust, after being arrested today by Quebec’s anti-corruption task force as part of a bribery case.

The charges are linked to two real-estate transactions that involved “tens of thousands of dollars” in illegal payments between 2006 and 2011, Robert Lafreniere, head of Quebec’s anti-corruption unit, told reporters at a televised press conference in Montreal today. Applebaum was arrested at his home, police said in a statement posted on the provincial government’s website. Read more of this post

Bank of England governor Sir Mervyn King: “There’s always been a willingness to be overly impressed by people who appear to be extraordinarily financially successful”

June 14, 2013 11:58 am

Lunch with the FT: Sir Mervyn King

By Martin Wolf

The Bank of England governor talks to the FT’s Martin Wolf about exits, euro solutions and the ‘audacity of pessimism’

Sir Mervyn King, who is to end 10 years as governor of the Bank of England at the end of the month, has organised this lunch himself. Uli in Notting Hill, he has explained in advance, is a favourite local restaurant, specialising in east Asian food. It is normally closed on Saturday lunchtime but Sir Mervyn has arranged for it to be opened especially for us. He has also asked the owner, Michael, to choose the food. The result is as excellent as it is excessive: soft-shelled crab; spicy scallops; Mongolian lamb, Singaporean laksa (a soup); steamed turbot; lamb curry; special fried rice; aubergine in sweet chilli; and seafood udon (noodles). The meal is devastatingly large. Read more of this post

Forget Lab Rats: Testing Asthma Drugs on a Microchip that could provide a better read on how a drug will work

Updated June 17, 2013, 7:02 p.m. ET

Forget Lab Rats: Testing Asthma Drugs on a Microchip

By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF

MK-CE070_ORGANC_G_20130617152312MK-CE076B_ORGAN_G_20130617182408

A chip engineered to replicate a human lung.

Forget lab rats. Some researchers are now testing medicines on a silicon chip that could provide a better read on how a drug will work.

These scientists are building “organs on a chip,” spooling together the important cells that make up, say, a lung, and then mimicking the key functions of the organ. Then researchers test to see what kind of impact a potential drug has on this lung-like system, created on a chip that is only a few inches long.

Companies are starting to tinker with this new technology, mostly for internal decision-making, since health regulators haven’t yet authorized their use in decisions about whether a compound can enter human testing. Read more of this post

Researchers from the Navy, the NASA and academia are studying causes and potential treatments of motion sickness, hoping to formulate better products for situations that range from the extreme to the mundane

June 17, 2013, 7:00 p.m. ET

New Views of Motion Sickness

Travel-Related Nausea Puzzles Scientists Amid Search for a Better Remedy; Ginger Root or a Nasal Spray?

By SUMATHI REDDY

It’s the medical nuisance that stumps everyone from NASA to the Navy: how to combat motion sickness. Sumathi Reddy looks at the latest research into why it happens, and what to do to keep it at bay.

Researchers from the Navy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and academia are studying causes and potential treatments of motion sickness, hoping to formulate better products for situations that range from the extreme (space!) to the mundane (road trip to Grandma’s, anyone?). Read more of this post

How old-economy firm Haier succeeded without Western-style razzmatazz

How old-economy firm succeeded without Western-style razzmatazz

Created: 2013-6-18

Author:Bill Fischer, Umberto Lago, and Fang Liu

LESS than 30 years from near-bankruptcy to global leadership; reinvention at least three times; trusting nearly 80,000 people to accept leadership roles in self-organizing, autonomous work units. Is it yet another new economy, Silicon Valley razzamatazz success story? Not at all.  This is about a Chinese company making home appliances, and it’s an incredible story about what is possible in old-economy, commodity markets.
Read more of this post

Online financial services threaten China’s traditional banks

Online financial services threaten China’s traditional banks

Kung Chun-jung and Staff Reporter

2013-06-16

The rapid emergence of the internet industry in China, which provides a broad range of online financial services, has posed a severe threat to the traditional banking and financial sectors, the money page of Chinese internet portal NetEase reports.

The emerging trend of online third-party payments, peer-to-peer (P2P) lending and P2P microfinance services has significantly eaten into the benefits offered by the established financial sector, the report said. Read more of this post

Foreign fast food chains in China experiencing confidence crisis

Foreign fast food chains in China experiencing confidence crisis

Staff Reporter

2013-06-18

Foreign fast food chains are facing a series of challenges that have hit their sales in China, which has become a key market after the companies’ rapid expansion in the country, the financial site of Chinese portal Tencent reported.

Yum Brands, which owns chains including KFC and Pizza Hut and controls 0.2% of the fast food market in China, posted a 13% drop in same-store sales at its over 5,200 outlets across the country in March, and forecast a further fall of 29% in April. Read more of this post

Chinese regulators seek to increase the public’s role in rooting out IPO fraud

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Chinese regulators seek to increase the public’s role in rooting out IPO fraud

China likes to keep its business to itself, often going so far as to label some corporate finances as state secrets. Few places have been more secretive than the securities market, where the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC) passes opaque judgments on which firms get to IPO, and when.

After years of poor performance of mainland exchanges, where companies are frequently found to be ridden with fraud, China’s top securities regulator has finally deigned to give the public a glimpse of the companies they could buy into.  Read more of this post

Canada has more Subway stores per capita than it does in the United States and store traffic in Canada is higher than at U.S. outlets

Subway thrives in Canada while avoiding beverage wars

Hollie Shaw | 13/06/17 | Last Updated: 13/06/17 5:29 PM ET

subway

Peter J. Thompson/National PostFred DeLuca, president and co-founder of Subway at the franchise’s 127 Bremner Boulevard Toronto location. Mr. DeLuca borrowed US$1,000 to start the business with a friend in 1965.

TORONTO • Subway Restaurants keeps growing steadily in Canada even though the fast-food sandwich purveyor has not followed rivals McDonald’s and Tim Hortons in appealing to coffee-loving Canadians. Read more of this post

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