Southeast Asia could have to brace for more forest fires and clouds of smoke in the years to come if climate change takes hold, a World Bank expert suggests

June 22, 2013, 4:08 PM

Could Climate Change Worsen Southeast Asia’s Forest Fires?

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By Eric Bellman

Southeast Asia could have to brace for more forest fires and clouds of smoke if climate change takes hold, a World Bank expert suggests. As temperatures climb, some parts of Southeast Asia will likely flood with rising sea levels while others face drought and heat waves. Drier jungles and peatlands in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and elsewhere could trigger more fires and spread more choking smoke across the region in the years to come. Read more of this post

Tencent-Naspers JV Ibibo Buys Redbus To Grow Its Online Travel Empire In India

Tencent, Naspers JV Ibibo Buys Redbus To Grow Its Online Travel Empire In India

VICTORIA HO

posted yesterday

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China’s internet giant Tencent and South Africa’s media powerhouseNaspers are doubling down on tech in India. TechCrunch has just found out that Ibibo, their domestic joint venture, has acquiredredBus.in, a Bangalore-based online bus ticketing company that has become a dominant and disruptive force in how people travel in the country. Read more of this post

Today’s Acqui-Hires Will Become Tomorrow’s Innovators

Today’s Acqui-Hires Will Become Tomorrow’s Innovators

PETER RELAN

posted 2 hours ago

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Editor’s note: Peter Relan is a former programmer and Internet executive, as well as a successful serial entrepreneur, Silicon Valley executive, angel investor, and technology veteran for over 25 years. He founded YouWeb Incubator in 2007, spinning out a string of successful mobile and gaming companies. Follow him on Twitter@prelan.

There is no doubt about the unprecedented wealth of talent in Silicon Valley, both technical and entrepreneurial. The area has become known as a mecca, and for some the Wild West, of digital innovation. So many entrepreneurs migrate to the Valley in hopes of building the next Facebook or Twitter, and technical talent and engineers are the bread and butter making this possible.  Read more of this post

The Science of Storytelling: Why Telling a Story is the Most Powerful Way to Activate Our Brains

The Science of Storytelling: Why Telling a Story is the Most Powerful Way to Activate Our Brains

A good story can make or break a presentation, article, or conversation. But why is that? When Buffer co-founder Leo Widrich started to market his product through stories instead of benefits and bullet points, sign-ups went through the roof. Here he shares the science of why storytelling is so uniquely powerful.

In 1748, the British politician and aristocrat John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, spent a lot of his free time playing cards. He greatly enjoyed eating a snack while still keeping one hand free for the cards. So he came up with the idea to eat beef between slices of toast, which would allow him to finally eat and play cards at the same time. Eating his newly invented “sandwich,” the name for two slices of bread with meat in between, became one of the most popular meal inventions in the western world. Read more of this post

Baking biscuits round the clock; Hunger sharpens the wits, a Spanish saying goes: For all the hardship it is inflicting, the crisis is helping many firms sharpen up

Spanish companies: For all the hardship it is inflicting, the crisis is helping many firms sharpen up

Jun 15th 2013 | AGUILAR DE CAMPOO |From the print edition

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Baking biscuits round the clock

IN A windswept Castilian town 300km (190 miles) north of Madrid, Europe’s largest biscuit plant is churning out digestives, wafers and crackers around the clock. The economic crisis has not really hurt Galletas Gullón, a family-owned firm that dates back to the 19th century: its products are staples in Spanish households and its newer range of “healthy” biscuits created the market sector they dominate. Read more of this post

Working-class 20- and 30-somethings are coming of age in a world of disappearing jobs and shrinking social support networks. Self-sufficiency has a dark side: it leaves little empathy to spare for those who cannot survive on their own

JUNE 22, 2013, 2:30 PM

Young and Isolated

By JENNIFER M. SILVA

In a working-class neighborhood in Lowell, Mass., in early 2009, I sat across the table from Diana, then 24, in the kitchen of her mother’s house. Diana had planned to graduate from college, marry, buy a home in the suburbs and have kids, a dog and a cat by the time she was 30. But she had recently dropped out of a nearby private university after two years of study and with nearly $80,000 in student loans. Now she worked at Dunkin’ Donuts. Read more of this post

Why some high-income earners still go broke

Why some high-income earners still go broke

Melissa Leong | 13/06/22 | Last Updated: 13/06/21 4:50 PM ET
Ten years ago, Jonathan Rivard approached a stone and stucco home with a three-car garage in the north end of Toronto. A Porsche and a Mercedes sat in the driveway and he could hear the mirth of children in a backyard swimming pool. Money is so easily spent. With a tap of your credit card or the shuffle of dollar bills, it’s gone, never to return — well, until payday. Even after you’ve diligently hoarded your funds, here are five things that will quickly deplete your savings. When he stepped inside, however, the rooms were stark, except for a few toys. He walked into the kitchen, pulled back a metal patio chair and took a seat at a glass lawn table. “Have you been robbed?” he asked, jokingly. “They couldn’t afford to furnish the house yet,” the advisor with Edward Jones remembers. “That to me was a wake-up call. There’s perceived wealth and actual wealth.” People may earn a high income. But that doesn’t necessarily make them wealthy. The more money someone makes, he has the same options as you and I: spend it, save it or invest it. Read more of this post

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